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  • RedHat: RHSA-2017-3248:01 Low: .NET Core security update
    LinuxSecurity.com: A security update for .NET Core on RHEL is now available. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact of Low. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, which gives a detailed severity rating, is available for each vulnerability from




  • Fedora 27: roundcubemail Security Update
    LinuxSecurity.com: Upstream announcement for **version 1.3.3** This is a security update to the stable version 1.3. It primarily fixes a recently discovered file disclosure vulnerability caused by insufficient input validation in conjunction with file- based attachment plugins, which are used by default. More details will be published under CVE-2017-16651. We strongly recommend to update all productive



  • Fedora 26: roundcubemail Security Update
    LinuxSecurity.com: Upstream announcement for **version 1.3.3** This is a security update to the stable version 1.3. It primarily fixes a recently discovered file disclosure vulnerability caused by insufficient input validation in conjunction with file- based attachment plugins, which are used by default. More details will be published under CVE-2017-16651. We strongly recommend to update all productive






  • An introduction to machine-learned ranking in Apache Solr
    This tutorial describes how to implement a modern learning to rank (LTR, also called machine-learned ranking) system in Apache Solr. It's intended for people who have zero Solr experience, but who are comfortable with machine learning and information retrieval concepts. I was one of those people only a couple of months ago, and I found it extremely challenging to get up and running with the Solr materials I found online.read more



  • Linux gizmo indexes photos and videos for visual recognition search
    Pimloc’s “Pholio” runs Linux on an Nvidia Tegra, and provides offline storage and search of images and video using visual and face recognition. Digital imaging has lived up to its promise of making it easier to take more images more quickly, but the promise that it would make it easier to find those images has […]


  • Font licensing and use: What you need to know
    Most of us have dozens of fonts installed on our computers, and countless others are available for download, but I suspect that most people, like me,†use fonts unconsciously. I just open up LibreOffice or Scribus†and use the defaults. Sometimes, however, we need a font for a specific purpose, and we need to decide which one is right for our project.read more


  • How to organize your passwords using pass password manager
    If you have the good habit to never use the same password for more than one purpose, you have probably already felt the need for a password manager. There are many alternatives to choose from on linux, both proprietary (if you dare) and open source. If you, like me, think that simplicity it's the way to go, you may be interested in knowing however to use the pass utility.


  • LVFS makes Linux firmware updates easier
    Traditionally, updating a BIOS or a network card[he]#039[/he]s firmware in Linux meant booting into Microsoft Windows or preparing a MS-DOS floppy disk and hoping everything would work correctly after the update. Periodically searching a vendor website for updates is a manual and error-prone task and not something we should ask users to do. A firmware update service makes it simpler for end users to implement hardware updates.






  • Linux/Android hacker SBC with hexa-core Rockchip SoC debuts at $75
    The Vamrs “RK3399 Sapphire” SBC is on sale for $75, or $349 for a full kit. Vamrs is also prepping an RK3399-based “Rock960” 96Boards SBC.Rockchip’s RK3399 is one of the most powerful ARM-based system-on-chips available on hacker boards, featuring two server-class Cortex-A72 cores clocked to up to 2.0GHz, as well as four Cortex-A53 at up to 1.42GHz and a quad-core Mali-T864 GPU.


  • Red Hat partners with AWS with OpenShift Container Platform 3.7
    Red Hat wants to be your AWS hybrid cloud and container company as well your Linux provider. Kubernetes has become the cloud container orchestration program. Red Hat jumped on the Kubernetes bandwagon early in 2015. Today, Red Hat is all in, with the release of the Red Hat OpenShift Container Platform 3.7.



  • DragonBoard gains a camera kit
    Arrow’s DragonBoard 410c Camera Kit combines the 96Boards SBC with D3’s DesignCore Camera Mezzanine Board OV5640 and a 5-megapixel camera module. D3 Engineering’s DesignCore Camera Mezzanine Board OV5640 is a 96Boards mezzanine add-on designed to work only with the Arrow Electronics/Qualcomm DragonBoard 410c. Arrow and D3 have now launched a kit that provides a DragonBoard […]


  • Mark McIntyre: How Do You Fedora?
    We recently interviewed Mark McIntyre on how he uses Fedora. This is part of a series on the Fedora Magazine. The series profiles Fedora users and how they use Fedora to get things done.




  • Reveal.js presentation hacks
    Ryan Jarvinen, a Red Hat open source advocate focusing on improving developer experience in the container community, has been using the Reveal.js presentation framework for more than five years. In his Lightning Talk at All Things Open 2017, he shares what he's learned about Reveal.js and some ways to make better use of it.read more


  • How to use special permissions: the setuid, setgid and sticky bits
    Normally, on a unix-like operating system, the ownership of files and directories is based on the default uid (user-id) and gid (group-id) of the user who created them. The same thing happens when a process is launched: it runs with the effective user-id and group-id of the user who started it, and with the corresponding privileges. This behavior can be modified by using special permissions.


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  • The Picture In Her Mind
    In her famous essays on the Sixties and Seventies, Joan Didion surveyed a society on the verge of a nervous breakdown. Now, more and more, critics are re-reading what she wrote.




  • Not Your Dad’s Dress Shoes
    Stop wearing boring dress shoes. With a stylish collection of color and material combinations, Ace Marks’ handcrafted Italian dress shoes are designed to make you stand out from the crowd.






  • How Do Animals Recognize Each Other?
    However wondrously varied the animal kingdom might be, on a species-level its residents tend to look more similar than not — at least, from a human perspective.




  • The Lost Genocide
    Why the United Nations may never be able to prosecute the Rohingya genocide.


  • The Best Dress Shoe Brand You’ve Never Heard Of
    Ace Marks makes some of the best dress shoes anywhere, and here’s the kicker: they cost half as much. Their shoes would run $600+ in the department store, but you can cop them directly for less than $250.











  • The Serial-Killer Detector
    A former journalist, equipped with an algorithm and the largest collection of murder records in the country, finds patterns in crime.




  • The Third Life Of Richard†Miles
    Richard Miles spent 15 years in prison for a crime he didn't commit. The state of Texas compensated Miles for his wrongful conviction, but life after vindication has come with its own set of challenges.






  • The Last Of The Iron Lungs
    This fall, I met three polio survivors who depend on iron lungs. They are among the last few, possibly the last three.




  • The Genius Of North Vietnam's War Strategy
    The most admirable thing about this fall's PBS series on the Vietnam War is the way in which it forces American audiences to confront the genius of North Vietnam's strategy.







  • America Rediscovers Its Love Of The Front Porch
    In the 20th century, porches couldn't compete with TV and air conditioning. Now this classic feature of American homes is staging a comeback as something more stylish and image-conscious than ever before.











  • Intel: We've Found Severe Bugs in Secretive Management Engine, Affecting Millions
    Liam Tung, writing for ZDNet: Thanks to an investigation by third-party researchers into Intel's hidden firmware in certain chips, Intel decided to audit its firmware and on Monday confirmed it had found 11 severe bugs that affect millions of computers and servers. The flaws affect Management Engine (ME), Trusted Execution Engine (TXE), and Server Platform Services (SPS). Intel discovered the bugs after Maxim Goryachy and Mark Ermolov from security firm Positive Technologies found a critical vulnerability in the ME firmware that Intel now says would allow an attacker with local access to execute arbitrary code. The researchers in August published details about a secret avenue that the US government can use to disable ME, which is not available to the public. Intel ME has been a source of concern for security-minded users, in part because only Intel can inspect the firmware, yet many researchers suspected the powerful subsystem had bugs that were ripe for abuse by attackers.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Flat Earther Plans To Launch Homemade Manned Rocket
    walterbyrd shares an Associated Press report: Self-taught rocket scientist "Mad" Mike Hughes is a 61-year-old limo driver who's spent the last few years building a steam-powered rocket out of salvage parts in his garage. His project has cost him $20,000, which includes Rust-Oleum paint to fancy it up and a motor home he bought on Craigslist that he converted into a ramp. His first test of the rocket will also be the launch date -- Saturday, when he straps into his homemade contraption and attempts to hurtle over the ghost town of Amboy, California. He will travel about a mile at a speed of roughly 500 mph. "I don't believe in science," said Hughes, whose main sponsor for the rocket is Research Flat Earth. "I know about aerodynamics and fluid dynamics and how things move through the air, about the certain size of rocket nozzles, and thrust. But that's not science, that's just a formula. There's no difference between science and science fiction."
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Google Collects Android Users' Locations Even When Location Services Are Disabled
    Google has been collecting Android phones' locations even when location services are turned off, and even when there is no carrier SIM card installed on the device, an investigation has found. Keith Collins, reporting for Quartz: Since the beginning of 2017, Android phones have been collecting the addresses of nearby cellular towers -- even when location services are disabled -- and sending that data back to Google. The result is that Google, the unit of Alphabet behind Android, has access to data about individuals' locations and their movements that go far beyond a reasonable consumer expectation of privacy. Quartz observed the data collection occur and contacted Google, which confirmed the practice. The cell tower addresses have been included in information sent to the system Google uses to manage push notifications and messages on Android phones for the past 11 months, according to a Google spokesperson. They were never used or stored, the spokesperson said, and the company is now taking steps to end the practice after being contacted by Quartz. By the end of November, the company said, Android phones will no longer send cell-tower location data to Google, at least as part of this particular service, which consumers cannot disable.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Trump Administration Tightens Scrutiny of Skilled Worker Visa Applicants
    wyattstorch516 writes: The Trump administration is tightening the scrutiny on the H-1B visa program (Warning: paywalled; alternative source). Changes would undo actions by the Obama administration. There are two big regulatory changes looming that would undo actions by the Obama administration. "The first change allowed spouses of H-1B workers the right to work. That regulation is being challenged in court and the Trump administration is expected to eliminate the provision rather than defend it," reports WSJ. "The second change affects the Optional Practical Training program, which allows foreign graduates from U.S. colleges in science and technology an extra two years of work authorization, giving them time to win an H-1B visa. The Trump administration could kill that benefit or reduce the two-year window, according to people familiar with the discussions." The Journal highlights a "series of more modest changes that have added scrutiny to visa processing":   - "USCIS directed last month that adjudicators no longer pay 'deference' to past determinations for renewal applications. This means an applicant's past approval won't carry any weight if he or she applies for a renewal.  - The agency is conducting more applicant interviews, which critics say slows the system. The agency spokesman says this process will ramp up over several years and is needed to detect fraud and make accurate decisions.  - In the spring, the agency suspended premium processing, which allowed for fast-track consideration to those who paid an extra fee. This option wasn't resumed until October, meaning many workers who qualified for a coveted H-1B visa had to wait months for a decision.  - State Department officials have been told to consider that Mr. Trump's 'Buy American, Hire American' executive order directs visa programs must 'protect the interests of United States workers.' And the Foreign Affairs Manual now instructs officers to scrutinize applications of students to ensure they plan to return to their home countries. A State Department official said the official rules haven't changed but said a 'comprehensive' review is under way."
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Google Cloud Platform Cuts the Price of GPUs By Up To 36 Percent
    In a blog post, Google's Product Manager, Chris Kleban, announced that the company is cutting the price of using Nvidia's Tesla GPUs through its Compute Engine by up to 36 percent. The older K80 GPUs will now cost $0.45 per hour while the more powerful P100 machines will cost $1.46 per minute (all with per-second billing). TechCrunch reports: The company is also dropping the prices for preemptible local SSDs by almost 40 percent. "Preemptible local SSDs" refers to local SSDs attached to Google's preemptible VMs. You can't attach GPUs to preemptible instances, though, so this is a nice little bonus announcement -- but it isn't going to directly benefit GPU users. As for the new GPU pricing, it's clear that Google is aiming this feature at developers who want to run their own machine learning workloads on its cloud, though there also are a number of other applications -- including physical simulations and molecular modeling -- that greatly benefit from the hundreds of cores that are now available on these GPUs. The P100, which is officially still in beta on the Google Cloud Platform, features 3594 cores, for example. Developers can attach up to four P100 and eight K80 dies to each instance. Like regular VMs, GPU users will also receive sustained-use discounts, though most users probably don't keep their GPUs running for a full month.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Study of Recent Interstellar Asteroid Reveals Bizarre Shape
    JoeRobe writes: A few weeks ago an interstellar asteroid, now named "Oumuamua," was discovered passing through our solar system. Being the first interstellar asteroid to ever be observed, a flurry of observations soon followed. This week, an accelerated article in Nature reveals that Oumuamua is more bizarre than originally thought: it is elongated, with a 10:1 aspect ratio, and rapidly rotating. This conclusion is based upon comparisons of its time-dependent light curve to those from 20,000 known asteroids.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Over 400 of the World's Most Popular Websites Record Your Every Keystroke
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from Motherboard: The idea of websites tracking users isn't new, but research from Princeton University released last week indicates that online tracking is far more invasive than most users understand. In the first installment of a series titled "No Boundaries," three researchers from Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy (CITP) explain how third-party scripts that run on many of the world's most popular websites track your every keystroke and then send that information to a third-party server. Some highly-trafficked sites run software that records every time you click and every word you type. If you go to a website, begin to fill out a form, and then abandon it, every letter you entered in is still recorded, according to the researchers' findings. If you accidentally paste something into a form that was copied to your clipboard, it's also recorded. These scripts, or bits of code that websites run, are called "session replay" scripts. Session replay scripts are used by companies to gain insight into how their customers are using their sites and to identify confusing webpages. But the scripts don't just aggregate general statistics, they record and are capable of playing back individual browsing sessions. The scripts don't run on every page, but are often placed on pages where users input sensitive information, like passwords and medical conditions. Most troubling is that the information session replay scripts collect can't "reasonably be expected to be kept anonymous," according to the researchers.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • UCLA Researchers Use Solar To Create and Store Hydrogen
    UCLA researchers have designed a device that can use solar energy to inexpensively and efficiently create and store energy, which could be used to power electronic devices, and to create hydrogen fuel for eco-friendly cars. Phys.Org reports: The device could make hydrogen cars affordable for many more consumers because it produces hydrogen using nickel, iron and cobalt -- elements that are much more abundant and less expensive than the platinum and other precious metals that are currently used to produce hydrogen fuel. Traditional hydrogen fuel cells and supercapacitors have two electrodes: one positive and one negative. The device developed at UCLA has a third electrode that acts as both a supercapacitor, which stores energy, and as a device for splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen, a process called water electrolysis. All three electrodes connect to a single solar cell that serves as the device's power source, and the electrical energy harvested by the solar cell can be stored in one of two ways: electrochemically in the supercapacitor or chemically as hydrogen. The device also is a step forward because it produces hydrogen fuel in an environmentally friendly way. Currently, about 95 percent of hydrogen production worldwide comes from converting fossil fuels such as natural gas into hydrogen -- a process that releases large quantities of carbon dioxide into the air, said Maher El-Kady, a UCLA postdoctoral researcher and a co-author of the research. The technology is described in the journal Energy Storage Materials.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Uber Expands Driverless-Car Push With Deal For 24,000 Volvos
    Uber agreed to buy 24,000 sport utility vehicles from Volvo to form a fleet of driverless autos. According to Bloomberg, "The XC90s, priced from $46,900 at U.S. dealers, will be delivered from 2019 to 2021 in the first commercial purchase by a ride-hailing provider." Uber will add its own sensors and software to permit pilot-less driving. From the report: Uber's order steps up efforts to replace human drivers, the biggest cost in its on-demand taxi service. The autonomous fleet is small compared with the more than 2 million people who drive for Uber but reflects dedication to the company's strategy of developing self-driving cars. "This new agreement puts us on a path toward mass-produced, self-driving vehicles at scale," Jeff Miller, Uber's head of auto alliances, told Bloomberg News. "The more people working on the problem, we'll get there faster and with better, safer, more reliable systems."
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • iMac Pro Will Have An A10 Fusion Coprocessor For 'Hey, Siri' Support and More Secure Booting, Says Report
    According to Apple firmware gurus Steven Troughton-Smith and Guilherme Rambo, the upcoming iMac Pro will feature an A10 Fusion coprocessor to enable two interesting new features. "The first is the ability for the iMac Pro to feature always-on 'Hey, Siri' voice command support, similar to what's currently available on more recent iPhone devices," reports The Verge. "[T]he bigger implication of the A10 Fusion is for a less user-facing function, with Apple likely to use the coprocessor to enable SecureBoot on the iMac Pro." From the report: In more practical terms, it means that Apple will be using the A10 Fusion chip to handle the initial boot process and confirm that software checks out, before passing things off to the regular x86 Intel processor in your Mac. It's not something that will likely change how you use your computer too much, like the addition of "Hey, Siri" support will, but it's a move toward Apple experimenting with an increased level of control over its software going forward.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Google Is Working On Fuchsia OS Support For Apple's Swift Programming Language
    An anonymous reader shares a report from Android Police: Google's in-development operating system, named "Fuchsia," first appeared over a year ago. It's quite different from Android and Chrome OS, as it runs on top of the real-time "Magenta" kernel instead of Linux. According to recent code commits, Google is working on Fuchsia OS support for the Swift programming language. If you're not familiar with it, Swift is a programming language developed by Apple, which can be used to create iOS/macOS/tvOS/watchOS applications (it can also compile to Linux). Apple calls it "Objective-C without the C," and on the company's own platforms, it can be mixed with existing C/Objective-C/C++ code (similar to how apps on Android can use both Kotlin and Java in the same codebase). We already know that Fuchsia will support apps written in Dart, a C-like language developed by Google, but it looks like Swift could also be supported. On Swift's GitHub repository, a pull request was created by a Google employee that adds Fuchsia OS support to the compiler. At the time of writing, there are discussions about splitting it into several smaller pull requests to make reviewing the code changes easier.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Why Hackers Reuse Malware
    Orome1 shares a report from Help Net Security: Software developers love to reuse code wherever possible, and hackers are no exception. While we often think of different malware strains as separate entities, the reality is that most new malware recycles large chunks of source code from existing malware with some changes and additions (possibly taken from other publicly released vulnerabilities and tools). This approach makes sense. Why reinvent the wheel when another author already created a working solution? While code reuse in malware can make signature-based detection methods more effective in certain cases, more often than not it frees up time for attackers to do additional work on detection avoidance and attack efficacy -- which can create a more dangerous final product.   There are multiple reasons why hackers reuse code when developing their own malware. First, it saves time. By copying code wherever possible, malware authors have more time to focus on other areas, like detection avoidance and attribution masking. In some cases, there may be only one way to successfully accomplish a task, such as exploiting a vulnerability. In these instances, code reuse is a no-brainer. Hacker also tend to reuse effective tactics such as social engineering, malicious macros and spear phishing whenever possible simply because they have a high rate of success.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • US Sues To Block AT&T Purchase of Time Warner
    The U.S. Department of Justice is suing AT&T to block its $85.4 billion acquisition of Time Warner. "The legal challenge was expected after AT&T rejected a demand by the Justice Department earlier this month to divest its DirecTV unit or Time Warner's Turner Broadcasting -- which contains news network CNN -- in order to win antitrust approval," reports Reuters. From the report: AT&T's chief executive said then that he would defend the deal in court to win approval, and the company criticized the Justice Department's case on Monday. The lawsuit is "a radical and inexplicable departure from decades of antitrust precedent," said AT&T lawyer David McAtee, arguing that so-called vertical mergers, between companies that are not direct competitors, are routinely approved. "We see no legitimate reason for our merger to be treated differently," he said, adding that AT&T is confident a judge will reject the Justice Department's case.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • An Ethereum Startup Just Vanished After People Invested $374K
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from Motherboard: A startup on the Ethereum platform vanished from the internet on Sunday after raising $374,000 USD from investors in an Initial Coin Offering (ICO) fundraiser. Confido is a startup that pitched itself as a blockchain-based app for making payments and tracking shipments. It sold digital tokens to investors over the Ethereum blockchain in an ICO that ran from November 6 to 8. During the token sale, Confido sold people bespoke digital tokens that represent their investment in exchange for ether, Ethereum's digital currency. But on Sunday, the company unceremoniously deleted its Twitter account and took down its website. A company representative posted a brief comment to the company's now-private subforum on Reddit, citing legal problems that prevent the Confido team from continuing their work. The same message was also posted to Medium but quickly deleted.   "Right now, we are in a tight spot, as we are having legal trouble caused by a contract we signed," the message stated (a cached version of the Medium post is viewable). "It is likely that we will be able to find a solution to rectify the situation. However, we cannot assure you with 100% certainty that we will get through this." The message was apparently written by Confido's founder, one Joost van Doorn, who seems to have no internet presence besides a now-removed LinkedIn profile. Even the Confido representative on Reddit doesn't seem to know what's going on, though, posting hours after the initial message, "Look I have absolutely no idea what has happened here. The removal of all of our social media platforms and website has come as a complete surprise to me." Confido tokens had a market cap of $10 million last week, before the company disappeared, but now the tokens are worthless. And investors are crying foul.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Amazon Launches a Cloud Service For US Intelligence Agencies
    Amazon Web Services on Monday introduced cloud service for the CIA and other members of the U.S. intelligence community. From a report: The launch of the so-called AWS Secret Region comes six years after AWS introduced GovCloud, its first data center region for public sector customers. AWS has since announced plans to expand GovCloud. The new Secret Region signals interest in using AWS from specific parts of the U.S. government. In 2013 news outlets reported on a $600 million contract between AWS and the CIA. That event singlehandledly helped Amazon in its effort to sign up large companies to use its cloud, whose core services have been available since 2006.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Level 5 driverless cars by 2021 can be done, say Brit industry folk
    Others reckon Chancellor's taking it a bit too far...
    Over the weekend, chancellor Philip Hammond boasted that “fully driverless cars” would be on Britain’s roads in four years’ time. Some in the driverless car industry think this is a dangerous fantasy, while more high-profile driverless car software companies are all in favour of it.…









  • Iran the numbers – and Persian internet is the cheapest in the world
    Burkina Faso the most expensive, UK in top third cheapest
    Tired of continual price hikes on your broadband deal? Then why not move to Iran? According to a study released today, it has the cheapest broadband in the world (if you're willing to ignore political and social problems...)…



  • Twitter's blue tick rule changes may lower the sueball barrier
    Got a few quid and want to launch a lawsuit? Now is a good time
    Comment Infamous online cesspit Twitter may have unintentionally made itself easier to sue for the things users write on its site, following recently announced changes to its "blue tick" verification system.…






  • Patch on way 'this week' for HP printer vulns
    RCE? Check. Clear passwords? Check. Interfere with print jobs? Check
    Sysadmins have been advised to watch for a coming HP printer firmware update that will plug a remote code execution vulnerability (among others) in its MFP-586 and the M553 printers.…




  • Marvell and Cavium do the deed, vow to breed infra-monster
    Six billion bucks does the trick, now let's see what kind of kit they build together
    The rumours were right: Marvell has formally announced it will buy Cavium, for around six billion US dollars, and plans to emerge as an “Infrastructure Solutions Powerhouse”.…


  • More than half of GitHub is duplicate code, researchers find
    Boffins beware: random samples are therefore useless for research
    Given that code sharing is a big part of the GitHub mission, it should come at no surprise that the platform stores a lot of duplicated code: 70 per cent, a study has found.…


  • Windows 8 broke Microsoft's memory randomisation
    The problem's still there in Windows 10, so prepare for code re-use attacks
    A Carnegie-Mellon CERT researcher has discovered that Microsoft broke some use-cases for its Address Space Layout Randomisation (ASLR), designed to block code-reuse attacks.…













  • Nathan Barley blamed for global GDP slump
    Clueless freelancers and the productivity puzzle
    Nathan Barley, the insufferable "self-facilitating media node" of Charlie Brooker's TV series, may be a prime culprit for Britain's lack of productivity growth.…




  • OnePlus 5T is like the little sister you always feared was the favourite
    This time, the flagship challenger gets it right
    Review OnePlus has settled into the groove of releasing two flagships a year, and this Christmas-time 5T reiteration may well piss off the fans who bought the OnePlus 5 released in the summer. It's better all round, sports the 6-inch 18:9 OLED that's a genuine flagship display... and it's the same price as before. So £499 buys you some absurd specs: 8GB of RAM and 128GB of storage, and £449 6GB/64GB.…












  • It's 2017, and command injection is still the top threat to web apps
    Open Web Application Security Project updated 'top-ten risks' lands on Monday, but we found a late, late draft
    The Open Web Application Security Project will on Monday, US time, reveal its annual analysis of web application risks, but The Register has sniffed out the final draft of the report and can report that it has found familiar attacks top its charts, but exotic exploits are on the rise.…




  • F5 DROWNing, not waving, in crypto fail
    Bleichenbacher, the name that always chills cryptographers' blood
    If you're an F5 BIG-IP sysadmin, get patching: there's a bug in the company's RSA implementation that can give an attacker access to encrypted messages.…


Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM