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  • Red Hat: 2017:0838-01: openjpeg: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for openjpeg is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact of Moderate. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, which [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2017:0837-01: icoutils: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for icoutils is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact of Important. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, [More...]



  • Red Hat: 2017:0817-01: kernel: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for kernel is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact of Moderate. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, which [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2017:0794-01: quagga: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for quagga is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact of Moderate. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, which [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2017:0744-01: samba4: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for samba4 is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact of Moderate. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, which [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2017:0725-01: bash: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for bash is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact of Moderate. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, which [More...]



  • YUM cheat sheet
    All YUM related articles in one place! Helpful YUM cheat sheet to learn, understand, revise YUM related sysadmin tasks on single page.


  • Open Labs leads 48-hour hackathon for good
    The local hackerspace in Tirana, Albania might be small, but they make up for size in spirit. During the weekend of March 18-19, 2017, the Open Labs Hackerspace organized the first-ever, 48-hour "open source" hackathon focused on the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.



  • Protect Your Online Privacy With The Tor Browser Bundle
    For anyone looking to protect their privacy online, Tor is an invaluable tool. It is both one of the most reliable ways to hide your identity and one of the easiest to use.There are multiple different ways to use Tor, but the simplest and quickest is the Tor Browser bundle. It is a self-contained Tor installation coupled with a specially configured Firefox installation designed to get you up an running with as few hassles and as little configuration as possible.


  • Latest Linux Maker Boards Gamble on Diversity
    As usual, last week’s Embedded World show in Nuremberg, Germany was primarily focused on commercial embedded single board computers (SBCs), computer-on-modules, and rugged industrial systems for the OEM market. Yet, we also saw a growing number of community-backed maker boards, which, like most of the commercial boards, run Linux.



  • grep vs AWK vs Ruby, and a uniq disappointment
    In my data-cleaning work I often make up tallies of selected individual characters from big, UTF-8-encoded data files. What's the best way to do this? As shown below, I've tried grep/sort/uniq, AWK and Ruby, and AWK's the fastest. The trials also revealed an unexpected problem with the uniq program in GNU coreutils.


  • How To bash compare numbers
    In Bash shell scripting we can perform comparison of the numbers. To perform bash compare numbers operation you need to use “test” condition within if else loop. This Post will quickly tell you how to bash compare numbers.


  • openSUSE Tumbleweed: A Linux distribution on the leading edge
    I have been using openSUSE for a long time -- basically, for as long as there has been an openSUSE. I used the "stable" numbered releases at first, but that was a typical "point-release" distribution, which got major updates in complete new releases which were made every six months or so. I like to keep up with the latest Linux developments, so when the original (unofficial) Tumbleweed distribution came along, I gave it a try -- and I have never gone back.




  • CoreOS Tectonic Now Installs Kubernetes on OpenStack
    CoreOS and OpenStack have a somewhat intertwined history, which is why it is somewhat surprising that it took until today for CoreOS's Tectonic Kubernetes distribution to provide an installer that targets OpenStack cloud deployments.


  • Python Inheritance
    Inheritance is yet another key concept in Object Oriented Programming, and it plays a vital role in building classes. It allows a class to be based off on an existing one.When you first started writing Python classes, you were told to just put "Object" in the parenthesis of the class definition and not think too much about it. Well, now's the time to start thinking about it.


  • 5 big ways AI is rapidly invading our lives
    Open source projects are helping drive artificial intelligence advancements, and we can expect to hear much more about how AI impacts our lives as the technologies mature. Have you considered how AI is changing the world around you already? Let's take a look at our increasingly artificially enhanced universe and consider the bold predictions about our AI-influenced future.read more


  • Linux Remote Control (VNC)
    I am sure there have been times, for those of you who have multiple PCs in the home, when you wish you could be sitting in front of a different system for a few minutes. You hate having to go to the other system and you wish for a better way. The answer is Virtual Network Computing (VNC).


  • NMAP FTP Bounce Attack
    An NMAP FTP Bounce Attack is similar in nature to an Idle Scan Attack. The requirement for the Bounce Attack is a File Transfer Protocol (FTP) Server with FXP.


  • How to Use Different Linux Bash Shells in Windows 10
    It’s no secret that Linux dominates the cloud, whether it’s a private cloud running on OpenStack or if it’s AWS or Microsoft Azure cloud. Microsoft itself admits that one out of three machines run Linux in Azure cloud. However, as more customers were running Linux, they needed the ability to manage their Linux systems, and Windows 10 lacked Linux tools and utilities.




  • Top 5: Kubernetes on the Raspberry Pi, Securing your Raspberry Pi, and more
    In this week's Top 5, we highlight Kubernetes on the Raspberry Pi, securing your Raspberry Pi, services for securing your email, making things cheaper with your 3D printer, and why users choose Linux and open source software.Top 5 articles of the week5. Why do you use Linux and open source software?read more


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  • A Bank That Cares? What A Concept
    Aspiration is cool for a bunch of reasons. They help you earn up to 100x more interest than the big banks. They reimburse you for any ATM fees worldwide. They were top rated by NerdWallet and Money Magazine. And they even let you set your own account fee (even if it’s zero.) Best of all, Aspiration is a NODAPL firm with green investing options, and donates 10% of fees.







  • Solving A Louisiana Town's Medical Mystery
    For decades, people living next to the neoprene plant in St. John the Baptist Parish, Louisiana, have felt they suffered more than their share of illnesses. And sure enough, they had.








  • Travel Smarter With This Anti-Theft Luggage
    This secure, soft-sided, semi-collapsible bag is perfectly sized for carry-on travel and features puncture resistant ToughZip™ technology and lockable zipper pullers to prevent thieves from sneaking their way in.



  • Every Series Of 'Power Rangers,' Explained
    Here's a complete rundown of every "Power Rangers" series in the franchise's 25-year history, from a superfan and someone who vaguely remembers yelling "Triceratops" as a kid.




  • Selling What They Preach
    From Amazon to Apple, from Starbucks to upscale hotel chains, brands are making claims not just about what people should buy, but about what people should be.


  • Critique In The Age Of Trump
    The world has, in many ways, become exponentially weirder and more unpredictable in the age of Trump. And this core set of derangements demand more imaginative and radical modes of thinking.


  • This Dystopian Riot Control Truck Is The Vehicle Of The Future
    We all want to believe that the future is filled with amazing technology, the end of disease, interplanetary travel, and a thriving environment. But the good folks at Bozena Security Systems know that the future is made of armored plating and riot gear.



  • Why I Can't Tell My Kids I'm A Pediatric Oncologist
    Most parents worry over how to answer the big questions, from the birds and the bees to why bad things happen, to even curiosity about death. What worried me more was how to tell my children exactly what I do.





  • Road Salt Is Causing Animals To Evolve
    "Contemporary evolution" is also happening at a scale that is easily observable in a human lifetime, and some of those changes are actually driven by humans.








  • Mandatory Carry
    In the future, everyone carries a gun. They have to. It's the law.





  • When Is The Best Time To Eat A Banana?
    If nutritional values basically don’t change as the banana ripens, why is the banana considered ripe and ready to eat when it’s bright yellow and freckled?


  • Hundreds Arrested As Russians Protest Corruption
    Thousands of Russians protested endemic corruption in the Russian government on Sunday, defying thinly-veiled threats issued by the Kremlin that it would “bear no responsibility for any possible negative consequences” for demonstrators.









  • Singapore Wants To Test Flying Taxi Drones
    An anonymous reader writes: Commuters in Singapore might soon be able to ride a flying taxi home at the end of the day," writes the New York Post. "The country's Minister of Transport is in negotiations with tech companies to start trials on taxi drones that can pick up passengers, says a story by Singapore's Business Times. The driverless pods, which resemble the speeding hover bikes in Return of the Jedi, would stop for passengers based on an 'e-hail' similar to what Uber uses, the report says." Flying taxis have already been prototyped, including the Hoversurf Scorpion and the Volocopter VC200, while Dubai plans to begin testing Ehang 184 self-driving flying taxi drones in July.   Though Singapore is a small country with a relatively small workforce, the head of their ministry of transportation "noted the availability and affordability of data and the rise of artificial intelligence are already upending the transport sector globally," reports the Singapore Business Times. To that end, Singapore is also considering on-demand buses that optimize their routes, but also driverless buses. "It has signed a partnership agreement with a party to build and put such buses through a trial, and will be signing another agreement quite soon."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Ask Slashdot: What's The Easiest Linux Distro For A Newbie?
    joseph Kramer -- a long-time user of both Windows and MacOS -- comes to Slashdot with the ultimate question:  I've been lurking here for years and seen many recommendations for a Linux flavor that works. What I'm really looking for is Linux that works without constant under-the-hood tweaking (ala early Windows flavors, 3.1, 95/98). Does such an OS exist? For the record, I am not an IT tech. I just need something to work with the mechanical equipment it controls. Any recommendations?  When it comes to Windows and MacOs, he describes himself as "fed up with their shenanigans." So leave your best answers in the comments. What's the best way for a newbie to get started with Linux?
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Researchers Discover A Surprising New Role for Lungs: Making Blood
    schwit1 quotes ScienceAlert: In experiments involving mice, the team found that lungs produce more than 10 million platelets (tiny blood cells) per hour, equating to the majority of platelets in the animals' circulation. This goes against the decades-long assumption that bone marrow produces all of our blood components. Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco also discovered a previously unknown pool of blood stem cells that makes this happen inside the lung tissue -- cells that were incorrectly assumed to mainly reside in bone marrow. "This finding definitely suggests a more sophisticated view of the lungs -- that they're not just for respiration, but also a key partner in formation of crucial aspects of the blood," says one of the researchers, Mark R. Looney.   The platelet-producing cells actually migrate from the bone marrow to the lungs.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Is Australia Becoming A Cashless Society?
    Australia's Reserve Bank will roll out an instantaneous money-transferring technology later this year, "which will push Australia even further towards being a cashless society," according to ABC. An anonymous reader quotes their report: In 2014, 12 financial institutions signed up to build the "New Payment Platform," partly as a way of bringing Australia up to speed with other countries that are ahead in the race to becoming completely cashless. Sweden is on track to become the world's first completely cashless economy, and just last November India got rid of its highest denomination bills, effectively eliminating 90 per cent of its paper money... The "New Payment Platform" will mean money can be transferred almost instantaneously, even when the payer and payee are members of different banks.   "It's estimated that somewhere between about $3.5 and $5 billion in Australia every year is lost in tax revenue due to the sort of cash economy," says an economics professor at the University of New South Wales, who predicts Australia could be cash-free by 2020. The Australian Payments Association reports that over 75% of the country's face-to-face payments are already tap-and-go, and ATM withdrawals have sunk to a 15-year low.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Class Action Lawsuit Launched Over Forced Windows 10 Upgrades
    Slashdot reader AmiMoJo quotes The Register: Three people in Illinois have filed a lawsuit against Microsoft, claiming that its Windows 10 update destroyed their data and damaged their computers. The complaint, filed in Chicago's U.S. District Court on Thursday, charges that Microsoft Windows 10 [installer] is a defective product, and that its maker failed to provide adequate warning about the potential risks posed by Windows 10 installation -- specifically system stability and data loss... The attorneys representing the trio are seeking to have the case certified as a class action that includes every person in the U.S. who upgraded to Windows 10 from Windows 7 and suffered data loss or damage to software or hardware within 30 days of installation. They claim there are hundreds or thousands of affected individuals.   Microsoft responded that they'd offered free customer service and other support options for "the upgrade experience," adding "We believe the plaintiffs' claims are without merit." But the complaint argues Windows 10's installer "does not check the condition of the PC and whether or not the hard drive can withstand the stress of the Windows 10 installation," according to Courthouse News, which adds that the lead plaintiff "says her hard drive failed after Windows 10 installed without her express approval, and she had to buy a new computer."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • After 20 Years, OpenSSL Will Change To Apache License 2.0, Seeks Past Contributors
    After nearly 20 years and 31,000 commits, OpenSSL wants to change to Apache License v2.0. They're now tracking down all 400 contributors to sign new license agreements, a process expected to take several months. Slashdot reader rich_salz shares links to OpenSSL's official announcement (and their agreement-collecting web site).  "This re-licensing activity will make OpenSSL, already the world's most widely-used FOSS encryption software, more convenient to incorporate in the widest possible range of free and open source software," said Mishi Choudhary, Legal Director of Software Freedom Law Center and counsel to OpenSSL. "OpenSSL's team has carefully prepared for this re-licensing, and their process will be an outstanding example of 'how to do it right.'"   Click through for some comments on the significance of this move from the Linux Foundation, Intel, and Oracle.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Is Microsoft Building A Foldable 'Surface' Phone?
    "This past week, Microsoft received a new patent for a foldable handset, and once again there are rumors that it is related to the long awaited, mythical Surface Phone," writes HardOCP, noting Samsung and LG are also rumored to be working on foldable phones. An anonymous reader quotes Hot Hardware: Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella made it clear that he doesn't want to kick out just another run-of-the-mill smartphone that looks and functions like every other device out there, but one that is unique in some aspect... This is not the first time Microsoft has filed a patent for what could be a folding Surface Phone. Just two months ago it was discovered that Microsoft filed a patent for a "Mobile Computing Device Having a Flexible Hinge Structure"...  Microsoft's patents include curved edges "intended to draw light away from the gaps, which would create an optical illusion of one continuous image," according to the article. "In this way, Microsoft could create a folding phone with multiple active displays appearing as a single, continuous image."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • London Terrorist Used WhatsApp, UK Calls For Backdoors
    Wednesday 52-year-old Khalid Masood "drove a rented SUV into pedestrians on Westminster Bridge before smashing it into Parliament's gates and rushing onto the grounds, where he fatally stabbed a policeman and was shot by other officers," writes the Associated Press. An anonymous reader quotes their new report: Westminster Bridge attacker Khalid Masood sent a WhatsApp message that cannot be accessed because it was encrypted by the popular messaging service, a top British security official said Sunday. British press reports suggest Masood used the messaging service owned by Facebook just minutes before the Wednesday rampage that left three pedestrians and one police officer dead and dozens more wounded.... Home Secretary Amber Rudd used appearances on BBC and Sky News to urge WhatsApp and other encrypted services to make their platforms accessible to intelligence services and police trying to carrying out lawful eavesdropping. "We need to make sure that organizations like WhatsApp -- and there are plenty of others like that -- don't provide a secret place for terrorists to communicate with each other," she said...  Rudd also urged technology companies to do a better job at preventing the publication of material that promotes extremism. She plans to meet with firms Thursday about setting up an industry board that would take steps to make the web less useful to extremists.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • New Release Of StarCraft In 4K Ultra High Definition Announced
    The classic 90s-era videogames StarCraft and StarCraft: Brood War will be re-released this summer -- remastered in 4K Ultra High Definition. An anonymous reader quotes The Verge:  It will also include a number of updates, such as remastered sound, new additional illustrations for the campaign missions, new matchmaking capabilities, the ability to connect to Blizzard App, the ability to save to the cloud, and more... Blizzard also announced that it was issuing a new update to StarCraft: Brood War this week, which will include some bug fixes and anti-cheat measures, but will also make StarCraft Anthology (which includes StarCraft and Brood War) available to download for free.   Kotaku reports that the news was announced at this weekend's I <3 StarCraft event in South Korea, "a mini-tournament between some of the game's best players being held to honor the game's legacy."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • 17-Year-Old Corrects NASA Mistake In Data From The ISS
    "A British teenager has contacted scientists at NASA to point out an error in a set of their own data," writes the BBC. An anonymous reader quotes their report.  A-level student Miles Soloman found that radiation sensors on the International Space Station (ISS) were recording false data... The correction was said to be "appreciated" by NASA, which invited him to help analyse the problem... The research was part of the TimPix project from the Institute for Research in Schools (IRIS), which gives students across the UK the chance to work on data from the space station, looking for anomalies and patterns that might lead to further discoveries. What Miles had noticed was that when nothing hit the detector, a negative reading was being recorded. But you cannot get negative energy... It turned out that Miles had noticed something no-one else had -- including the NASA experts. NASA said it was aware of the error, but believed it was only happening once or twice a year. Miles had found it was actually happening multiple times a day.   There's a video of the student -- and his teacher -- describing the discovery, a story which Miles says his friends at high school listen to with "a mixture of jealousy and boredom"
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Aerospace Startup Will Build A Supersonic Mach 2.2 Aircraft
    A new commercial aircraft will fly more than twice the speed of sound, traveling from New York to London in 3.4 hours. An anonymous reader quotes Fortune: Colorado-based startup Boom Supersonic is one step closer to making such travel a reality after securing $33 million in investments to construct and fly its first supersonic jet, the XB-1 demonstration and testing craft, according to TechCrunch... With the new funding, Boom will be able to put that concept -- and the technology needed to power it -- to the test. "This funds our first airplane, all the way through flight tests," Boom founder and CEO Blake Scholl told TechCrunch. "Now we have all the pieces we need â" technology, suppliers and capital â" to go out and make some history and set some speed records."  They'll be testing a prototype that's one-third smaller than the commercial version within the next year.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Theranos To Investors: Please Don't Sue! Here, Have Some More Shares
    Theranos "plans to give additional shares to investors who pledge not to sue," reports the Wall Street Journal. An anonymous reader quotes Silicon Beat:  The deal, which hasn't been disclosed publicly, was approved by the Palo Alto-based company's board last month, The Wall Street Journal reported, citing anonymous "people familiar with the matter." They said most investors have tentatively agreed to the deal. Those extra shares are coming from none other than founder and CEO Elizabeth Holmes' personal cache, the Journal reported. That means the beleaguered founder, who has remained stubbornly at the helm of her struggling startup even though federal regulators have barred her from running a medical lab for two years, would give up her majority ownership in the company.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Over 14K 'Let's Encrypt' SSL Certificates Issued To PayPal Phishing Sites
    BleepingComputer reports: During the past year, Let's Encrypt has issued a total of 15,270 SSL certificates that contained the word 'PayPal' in the domain name or the certificate identity. Of these, approximately 14,766 (96.7%) were issued for domains that hosted phishing sites, according to an analysis carried out on a small sample of 1,000 domains, by Vincent Lynch, encryption expert for The SSL Store... Lynch, who points out the abuse of Let's Encrypt's infrastructure, doesn't blame the Certificate Authority (CA), but nevertheless, points out that other CAs have issued a combined number of 461 SSL certificates containing the term "PayPal" in the certificate information, which were later used for phishing attacks... Phishers don't target these CAs because they're commercial services, but also because they know these organizations will refuse to issue certificates for certain hot terms, like "PayPal," for example. Back in 2015, Let's Encrypt made it clear in a blog post it doesn't intend to become the Internet's HTTPS watchdog.  Of course, some web browsers don't even check whether a certificate has been revoked. An anonymous reader writes:  Browser makers are also to blame, along with "security experts" who tell people HTTPS is "secure," when they should point out HTTPS means "encrypted communication channel," and not necessarily that the destination website is secure.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • A 21st-Century Version Of OS/2 Warp May Be Released Soon
    dryriver writes: A company named Arca Noae is working on a new release of the X86 OS/2 operating system code named "Blue Lion" and likely called ArcaOS 5 in its final release. Blue Lion wants to be a modern 21st Century OS/2 Warp, with support for the latest hardware and networking standards, a modern accelerated graphics driver, support for new cryptographic security standards, full backward compatibility with legacy OS/2, DOS and Windows 3.1 applications, suitability for use in mission-critical applications, and also, it appears, the ability to run "ported Linux applications". Blue Lion, which appears to be in closed beta with March 31st 2017 cited as the target release date, will come with up to date Firefox browser and Thunderbird mail client, Apache OpenOffice, other productivity tools, a new package manager, and software update and support subscription to ensure system stability. It is unclear from the information provided whether Blue Lion will be able to run modern Windows applications.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • UK Broadband Customers Set To Receive Millions In Compensation For Bad Service
    An anonymous reader quotes The Stack: British telecoms regulator Ofcom has revealed new plans which would see consumers who experience poor service automatically compensated, in cash or credit, by their landline or broadband providers. As part of the scheme, customers who have had to put up with delayed repairs, missed installation or engineer appointments, will be paid up to £30 in compensation, depending on the issue. According to Ofcom, 6 million landline and broadband customers could receive a total of around £185 million (approximately $230 million) in compensatory payments each year as a result of the policy. The regulator says every year U.K. repair technicians failed to show up for 250,000 repair appointments.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • iPhone-havers think they're safe. But they're not
    Growing mobile threats affect iOS
    Mobile malware is at the highest level yet recorded, infecting 1.35 per cent of all mobile devices in October, according to a study by Nokia out today. The high water mark in October compares to figures of 1.06 per cent in April 2016.…



  • Boffins name 12 new types of cloud in first Cloud Atlas since 1986
    Actual fluffy things in the sky found by digicam-wielding masses, but hosted in AWS
    The World Meteorological Organisation has published the first new edition of its Cloud Atlas since 1986 and in so doing named eleven new types of cloud, some identified by digital-camera-wielding citizen cloud wonks.…


  • UK.gov departments accused of blanket approach to IR35
    Confusion reigns as some departments apply massive crackdown
    Government departments have been accused of applying a blanket approach to tax changes under IR35, meaning the majority of contractors are being found within the scope of the legislation by default.…


  • Manufacturers reject ‘no deal’ Brexit approach
    Access to both the single market and the customs union 'key', says EEF
    The representative group for manufacturers is calling on the government to reject a "no deal is better than a bad deal" approach to Brexit, warning the UK’s manufacturing sector would bear the brunt.…


  • How Ford has slammed the door on Silicon Valley's autonomous vehicles drive
    Owning the smartphone-dashboard interface
    Detroit and Silicon Valley aren't just 2,000 miles apart – they're on different planets, culturally speaking. One is the home of America's automotive industry, a heavily regulated, ultra-conservative sector focusing on high-volume, low-margin sales. The other houses companies that deal in high-margin information and digital services, acting first and begging forgiveness later. They are also in competition to own what some are calling the next personal computing platform: the car.…



  • The 'data driven enterprise' is actually just the enterprise
    Making the qualitative quantitative
    Many, many moons ago – OK, more than 25 years ago – I studied computing science at university. Yet there are still many instances in my modern life where I find myself thinking back to something I was taught in the 1980s. One recent example was a flurry of conversations and articles about the “data driven” enterprise.…


  • USA can afford golf for Trump. Can't afford .com for FBI infosec service
    So guess what spoofers are doing with the fake site? Yup – getting dupes to log in
    InfraGard.org is supposed to be on of the United States' defences against online criminals. But the FBI-led service is currently the subject of a typosquatting and email attack that could see organisations seeking protection instead send their personal data straight to parties unknown.…



  • Boffins crowdsource hunt for 'Planet 9'
    AI isn't ready to find planet beyond Kuiper Belt. So you - yes you - have the chance to scour thousands of images
    The Australian National University (ANU) is recruiting citizens to look at hundreds of thousands of images, in case they can find the mooted-but-not-yet-discovered “Planet 9”.…


  • Trump's America looks like a lousy launchpad, so can you dig Darwin?
    The space boom is lifting off and there's only so many places close to the equator with heavy industry and stable government
    At some point over the last fortnight, watching the second launch countdown in as many weeks via YouTube livestream, it became clear the Second Space Age - as promised by Elon Musk and Jeff Bezos and Richard Branson - had become entirely real. The promised land of cheap(er) commercial payload launches has come to pass.…


  • Uber-mobile T-boned, rolls onto side
    Autonomous car was not at fault, but Uber takes its fleet off the road regardless
    Uber's taken its nascent fleet of self-driving cars off the road after one rolled in an accident.…


  • Toshiba's nuclear power plant business runs out of steam
    Westinghouse Electric seeks Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection
    Toshiba has decided to press the big red button in its attempts to reorganise its nuclear power business, seeking Chapter 11 protection for troubled Westinghouse Electric.…



  • Converged systems market is so hot it just went backwards
    FY 2016 was okay, but Q4 was ugly, which may explain the SimpliVity fire sale and Nutanix's revenue warning
    Converged systems are supposed to be the hot spot of the otherwise-troubled server and storage markets. Yet sales just dipped for 2016's final quarter, according to kit-counting firm IDC, and overall growth for the year was tepid.…



  • Dishwasher has directory traversal bug
    Thanks a Miele-on for making everything dangerous, Internet of things security slackers
    Don't say you weren't warned: Miele went full Internet-of-Things with a dishwasher, gave it a web server and now finds itself on the wrong end of a bug report and it's accused of ignoring the warning.…


  • Sources: Misco SOLD to Hilco Capital, care home for the distressed
    Failed tech reseller joins same stables as HMV, Jessops, Staples...
    Exclusive Systemax has offloaded almost all of its Misco-branded European reseller operations to Hilco Capital, a buyer of distressed firms that will add the failing tech supplier to a basket that already contains HMV and Staples, multiple sources have told The Reg.…






  • Astroboffins stunned by biggest brown dwarf at edge of our galaxy
    Not big enough to be a proper star; not small enough to be a planet
    Pic Astronomers claim to have identified the largest and purest brown dwarf – measuring in at a record-breaking 90 times the mass of Jupiter – hovering around the edges of the Milky Way.…








  • Alternative vet Quartermaine exits Daisy, Daisy...
    Bicycles into the sunset
    Brit IT services giant Daisy Group has waved goodbye to former Alternative Networks CEO Mark Quartermaine – just months after it bought the comms and tech integrator, an internal document has confirmed.…


  • Lloyds Banking Group axing hundreds of jobs AGAIN
    And that's even before all of those techies are farmed out to IBM
    Lloyds Banking Group is throwing more UK techies overboard ahead of the big outsourcing deal with a “single strategic partner” that El Reg previously revealed was IBM.…





  • Profitless Twitter starts rumour of paid-for Tweetdeck option
    Gotta do something to break even, right?
    Twitter, the profitless microblogging website, has floated the idea of offering a paid-for version of its Tweetdeck product – and this is going down amongst the site’s users like a cup of lukewarm vomit.…








  • Gov may need to splash £245m per year on IT contractors – NAO
    Please come back freelancers, forget IR35: all is forgiven
    The government will need to splash £145m per year on 2,000 digital staff - or £244m using contractors - if it is to meet the serious shortfall in skills, according to the National Audit Office.…








  • Google slaps Symantec for sloppy certs, slow show of SNAFUs
    Certs will keep working, but Chrome will be suspicious, soon
    Updated Google's Chrome development team has posted a stinging criticism of Symantec's certificate-issuance practices, saying it has lost confidence in the company's practices and therefore in the safety of sessions hopefully-secured by Symantec-issued certificates.…


Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM