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  • Debian: DSA-4118-1: tomcat-native security update
    LinuxSecurity.com: Jonas Klempel reported that tomcat-native, a library giving Tomcat access to the Apache Portable Runtime (APR) library's network connection (socket) implementation and random-number generator, does not properly handle fields longer than 127 bytes when parsing the AIA-Extension field


  • Debian: DSA-4117-1: gcc-4.9 security update
    LinuxSecurity.com: This update doesn't fix a vulnerability in GCC itself, but instead provides support for building retpoline-enabled Linux kernel updates. For the oldstable distribution (jessie), this problem has been fixed



  • Debian LTS: DLA-1285-1: bind9 security update
    LinuxSecurity.com: BIND, a DNS server implementation, was found to be vulnerable to a denial of service flaw was found in the handling of DNSSEC validation. A remote attacker could use this flaw to make named exit unexpectedly with an


  • Debian: DSA-4116-1: plasma-workspace security update
    LinuxSecurity.com: Krzysztof Sieluzycki discovered that the notifier for removable devices in the KDE Plasma workspace performed insufficient sanitisation of FAT/VFAT volume labels, which could result in the execution of arbitrary shell commands if a removable device with a malformed disk label is


  • ArchLinux: 201802-8: irssi: multiple issues
    LinuxSecurity.com: The package irssi before version 1.1.1-1 is vulnerable to multiple issues including arbitrary code execution, information disclosure and denial of service.







  • A better marketing plan for your open source software project
    Open source software (OSS) marketing today is unique: it’s a process of co-creating and co-executing a marketing plan with an entire community—developers, end users and vendors. This makes it distinctly different than most traditional technology marketing efforts, which generally focuses on business decision-makers exclusively.


  • Servers? We don't need no stinkin' servers!
    You may be moving your mission-critical applications to a serverless architecture sooner than you think. OK, so we'll always need some servers. But with the rise of virtual machines (VM)s and container technologies such as Docker, combined with DevOps and cloud orchestration to automatically manage ever-larger numbers of server applications, serverless computing is becoming real.


  • Your DevOps attempt will fail without these 7 departments buying in
    When DevOps was coined by Andrew Shafer and Patrick Debois, the goal was to bring developers and operators closer to achieve customer value together. DevOps is a culture of continuous learning and improvement. While automation and tools can garner some improvements, having the right culture drives larger impacts. The sharing of knowledge and ideas resulting in cultural growth is the value creator in DevOps.


  • i.MX6 UL based COM/SBC hybrid has FPGA with programmable ZPU
    Technologic’s rugged, open-spec “TS-4100” COM/SBC hybrid runs Linux on an i.MX6 UL, and offers a microSD slot, 4GB eMMC, a micro-USB OTG port, optional WiFi/BT and baseboard, and an FPGA with a programmable ZPU core for offloading real-time tasks. Technologic Systems has begun sampling its first i.MX6 UL (UltraLite) based board, which is also its first computer-on-module that can double as a single board computer.



  • PyTorch Should Be Copyleft
    Neural networks have started to take off since AlexNet in 2012. We don’t have to call it a software war, but there’s a competition for mindset and community contributors in neural networks.



  • Learning IT Fundamentals
    Where do IT fundamentals fit in our modern, cloud- and abstraction-driven engineering culture? Although you can use modern Linux desktops and servers without knowing almost anything about how computers, networks or Linux itself works, unlike with other systems, Linux still will show you everything that's going on behind the scenes if you are willing to look.


  • Module reveals new AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC
    Advantech is prepping a “SOM-5871” computer-on-module with an unannounced AMD V1000 Zen SoC, which appears to be AMD’s rumored, 14nm Ryzen Embedded V1000 “Great Horned Owl” successor to the R-Series. iBase also leaked info on a V1000 based Mini-ITX board and fanless PC. Advantech has posted a preliminary product page for a SOM-5871 module that […]



  • Linux on Nintendo Switch, a new Kubernetes ML platform, and more news
    In this edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at the Mozilla's IoT gateway, a new machine learning platform, Code.mil's revamp, and more.Open source news roundup for February 4-17, 2018Mozilla announces Project Things for a more secure IoTMozilla wants you to have control over your connected devices. To help you gain that control, they've released Project Things into the wild.read more


  • How To Install Redmine on CentOS 7
    In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Redmine on CentOS. Redmine is a free and open source issue tracking and web-based project management application. Redmine is built on Ruby on Rails framework and it is cross-platform and cross-database. This guide should work on other Linux VPS systems as well but was tested and written for CentOS 7 VPS


  • How to make sense of the Apache 2 patent license
    The Apache 2 license contains a number of key provisions including a patent grant that, in my experience, is often misunderstood. This grant has a significant effect on making open source safe to use. Let me explain by exploring a portion of Section 3 of the Apache 2.0 license.





  • The knitting printer and more art with open source
    For several years, linux.conf.au, a week-long conference (held this year from January 22-26), has held "miniconfs" offering space for tech community niche groups to share their inventions and ideas. In 2018, 12 miniconfs were held on the first two days of the conference, and the Art + Tech miniconf took the concept to the next level with an entire day of 11 talks about making art with tech, as well as an art exhibition head during the conference.read more


  • Real-time Linux based automation controller supports up to 16 I/O modules
    Opto 22 announced its first Linux-based automation controller: a rugged “Groov EPIC” system that runs real-time Linux on a quad-core ARM SoC, and supports process and machine control, SCADA/RTU, and industrial IoT edge gateway applications. Increasingly, industrial equipment manufacturers must not only compete on features, but also meet their clients’ need to attract the best […]


  • Top 5: SpaceX, drone projects, vi tips, and more
    Since Valentine's Day was earlier this week, I thought we'd focus on love. There's plenty to love in this week's top 5, so let's take a look. And before you go, be sure to enter to win a Mycroft Mark 1 voice assistant.read more


  • Q4OS Makes Linux Easy for Everyone
    Modern Linux distributions tend to target a variety of users. Some claim to offer a flavor of the open source platform that anyone can use. And, I’ve seen some such claims succeed with aplomb, while others fall flat. Q4OS is one of those odd distributions that doesn’t bother to make such a claim but pulls off the feat anyway.


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  • Casper Upgraded Their Mattress And It’s Awesome
    Casper took their acclaimed mattress and made it better by adding proprietary foam technology that contours to your body for pressure-relieving support where you need it most. Get $125 off any $1,250 purchase and $200 off any $2,000 purchase with the promo codes PREZ125 or PREZ200 now through February 20.





  • A Philosopher Makes The Case For Polyamory
    For the past four years, Jenkins has had both a loving husband and a loving boyfriend, and everyone knows about everyone else. But, social stigmas being what they are, Jenkins spent several years hiding this part of her life.








  • The Best Photography Of The Week
    Butt bouquets for Valentine's Day, what it's like living close to an airport, and magical photos of Japan's "decorated truck" subculture.




  • When Prohibition Works
    The most intellectually honest argument for the easy availability of military-style rifles, at the end of the day, is that they are fun to shoot. This is also one of the stronger arguments for Quaaludes.







  • The Week's Coolest Space Images
    Every day satellites are zooming through space, snapping incredible pictures of Earth, the solar system and outer space. Here are the highlights from this week.



  • The Case Against Sheriffs
    This week, Jeff Sessions said "the office of the Sheriff is a critical part of the Anglo-American heritage of law enforcement." Drew Magary unpacks the messy, dangerous history behind the office.


  • The Feminist Pursuit Of Good Sex
    The root of tensions between women over #MeToo isn't about a generation gap. It's part of a long fight over the politics of pleasure.



  • Grannies Gone Wild
    In the midst of a persistent housing shortage in the Bay Area, some homeowners, city planners, architects, and tech startups believe that backyard cottages — granny flats — might be the key to sustainable growth.




  • The Donkey Kong Timeline Is Truly Disturbing
    Are you sitting down? I've got something to tell you — something that may shock you. Between the events of the various Donkey Kong games, the Kong family was involved in a bitter and vicious war.






  • Good Lord, Look At The Size Of This Feral Pig
    This clip of a feral pig the size of a small house is only 4 seconds long, and honestly that's a good thing because we progressively lost our grip on reality with each second that passed.






  • The Mess At Meetup
    While much of the tech industry struggled to create inclusive work environments and free itself from workplace harassment allegations, Meetup was different — until it started negotiating an acquisition with WeWork and everything changed.









  • Contractors Pose Cyber Risk To Government Agencies
    Ian Barker, writing for BetaNews: While US government agencies are continuing to improve their security performance over time, the contractors they employ are failing to meet the same standards according to a new report. The study by security rankings specialist BitSight sampled over 1,200 federal contractors and finds that the security rating for federal agencies was 15 or more points higher than the mean of any contractor sector. It finds more than eight percent of healthcare and wellness contractors have disclosed a data breach since January 2016. Aerospace and defense firms have the next highest breach disclosure rate at 5.6 percent. While government has made a concerted effort to fight botnets in recent months, botnet infections are still prevalent among the government contractor base, particularly for healthcare and manufacturing contractors. The study also shows many contractors are not following best practices for network encryption and email security.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Who Killed The Junior Developer?
    Melissa McEwen, writing on Medium: A few months ago I attended an event for women in tech. A lot of the attendees were new developers, graduates from code schools or computer science programs. Almost everyone told me they were having trouble getting their first job. I was lucky. My first "real" job out of college was "Junior Application developer" at Columbia University in 2010. These days it's a rare day to find even a job posting for a junior developer position. People who advertise these positions say they are inundated with resumes. But on the senior level companies complain they can't find good developers. Gee, I wonder why? I'm not really sure the exact economics of this, because I don't run these companies. But I know what companies have told me: "we don't hire junior developers because we can't afford to have our senior developers mentor them." I've seen the rates for senior developers because I am one and I had project managers that had me allocate time for budgeting purposes. I know the rate is anywhere from $190-$300 an hour. That's what companies believe they are losing on junior devs.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • US's Greatest Vulnerability is Ignoring the Cyber Threats From Our Adversaries, Foreign Policy Expert Says
    America's greatest vulnerability is its continued inability to acknowledge the extent of its adversaries' capabilities when it comes to cyber threats, says Ian Bremmer, founder and president of leading political risk firm Eurasia Group. From a report: Speaking to CNBC from the Munich Security Conference on Saturday, the prominent American political scientist emphasized that there should be much more government-level concern and urgency over cyber risk. The adversarial states in question are what U.S. intelligence agencies call the "big four": Russia, China, North Korea, and Iran. "We're vulnerable because we continue to underestimate the capabilities in those countries. WannaCry, from North Korea -- no one in the U.S. cybersecurity services believed the North Koreans could actually do that," Bremmer described, naming the ransomware virus that crippled more than 200,000 computer systems across 150 countries in May of 2017. Borge Brende, president of the World Economic Forum, weighed in, stressing the economic cost of cyber crimes. "It is very hard to attribute cyberattacks to different actors or countries, but the cost is just unbelievable. Annually more than a thousand billion U.S. dollars are lost for companies or countries due to these attacks and our economy is more and more based on internet and data."
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • New AI Model Fills in Blank Spots in Photos
    A new technology uses artificial intelligence to generate synthetic images that can pass as real. From a report, shared by a reader (the link may be paywalled): The technology was developed by a team led by Hiroshi Ishikawa, a professor at Japan's Waseda University. It uses convolutional neural networks, a type of deep learning, to predict missing parts of images. The technology could be used in photo-editing apps. It can also be used to generate 3-D images from real 2-D images. The team at first prepared some 8 million images of real landscapes, human faces and other subjects. Using special software, the team generated numerous versions for each image, randomly adding artificial blanks of various shapes, sizes and positions. With all the data, the model took three months to learn how to predict the blanks so that it could fill them in and make the resultant images look identical to the originals. The model's learning algorithm first predicts and fills in blanks. It then evaluates how consistent the added part is with its surroundings.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • We've Reached Peak Smartphone
    You don't really need a new smartphone. From a column on the Washington Post (may be paywalled): Sure, some of them squeeze more screen into a smaller form. The cameras keep getting better, if you look very close. And you had to live under a rock to miss the hoopla for Apple's 10th-anniversary iPhone X or the Samsung Galaxy S8. Many in the smartphone business were sure this latest crop would bring a "super cycle" of upgrades. But here's the reality: More and more of Americans have decided we don't need to upgrade every year. Or every other year. We're no longer locked into two-year contracts and phones are way sturdier than they used to be. And the new stuff just isn't that tantalizing even to me, a professional gadget guy. Holding onto our phones is better for our budgets, not to mention the environment. This just means we -- and phone makers -- need to start thinking of them more like cars. We may have reached peak smartphone. Global shipments slipped 0.1 percent in 2017 -- the first ever decline, according to research firm IDC. In the United States, smartphone shipments grew just 1.6 percent, the smallest increase ever. Back in 2015, Americans replaced their phones after 23.6 months, on average, according to research firm Kantar Worldpanel. By the end of 2017, we were holding onto them for 25.3 months.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Facebook Plans To Use US Mail To Verify IDs of Election Ad Buyers
    Facebook will start using postcards sent by U.S. mail later this year to verify the identities and location of people who want to purchase U.S. election-related advertising on its site, a senior company executive said on Saturday. From a report: The postcard verification is Facebook's latest effort to respond to criticism from lawmakers, security experts and election integrity watchdog groups that it and other social media companies failed to detect and later responded slowly to Russia's use of their platforms to spread divisive political content, including disinformation, during the 2016 U.S. presidential election.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Google is Making it Easier For 911 To Find You in an Emergency
    An anonymous reader shares a report: When you call 911 from a cellphone, your location is typically sent to the call taker by a wireless carrier. But that information isn't always so accurate. Well Google might have a better way of going about it and it tested its system across a few states in December and January, the Wall Street Journal reports. In the states where the tests took place, Google sent location data from a random selection of 911 callers using Android phones straight to the people taking those calls. The test included 50 call centers that cover around 2.4 million people in Texas, Tennessee and Florida, and early reports of the results suggest the system is promising. One company involved in the test told the Wall Street Journal that for over 80 percent of the 911 calls where Googl's system was used, the tech giant's location data were more accurate than what wireless carriers provided. The company, RapidSOS, also said that while carrier data location estimates had, on average, a radius of around 522 feet, Google's data gave estimates with radii around 121 feet. Google's data also arrived more quickly than carrier data typically did.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Silicon Valley Singles Are Giving Up On the Algorithms of Love
    The Washington Post: Melissa Hobley, an executive at the dating app OkCupid, hears the complaints about the apps [being unable to find good matches] regularly and thinks they get a bad rap. Silicon Valley workers "are in the business of scalable, quick solutions. And that's not what love is," Hobley said. "You can't hurry love. It's reciprocal. You're not ordering an object. You're not getting a delivery in less than seven minutes." Finding love, she added, takes commitment and energy -- and, yes, time, no matter how inefficiently it's spent. "You have a whole city obsessed with algorithms and data, and they like to say dating apps aren't solving the problem," Hobley said. "But if a city is male-dominant, if a city is known for 16-hour work days, those are issues that dating apps can't solve." One thing distinguishes the Silicon Valley dating pool: The men-to-women ratio for employed, young singles in the San Jose metro area is higher than in any other major area. There were about 150 men for every 100 women, compared with about 125 to 100 nationwide, of never-married young people between 25 and 34 in San Jose, U.S. Census Bureau data from 2016 shows. That ratio permeates the economy here, all the way to the valley's biggest employers, which have struggled for years to bring more women into their ranks. Men make up about 70% of the workforces of Apple, Facebook and Google parent Alphabet, company filings show.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Deep Neural Networks for Bot Detection
    From a research paper on Arxiv: The problem of detecting bots, automated social media accounts governed by software but disguising as human users, has strong implications. For example, bots have been used to sway political elections by distorting online discourse, to manipulate the stock market, or to push anti-vaccine conspiracy theories that caused health epidemics. Most techniques proposed to date detect bots at the account level, by processing large amount of social media posts, and leveraging information from network structure, temporal dynamics, sentiment analysis, etc. In this paper [PDF], we propose a deep neural network based on contextual long short-term memory (LSTM) architecture that exploits both content and metadata to detect bots at the tweet level: contextual features are extracted from user metadata and fed as auxiliary input to LSTM deep nets processing the tweet text.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Facebook Admits SMS Notifications Sent Using Two-Factor Number Was Caused by Bug
    Facebook has clarified the situation around SMS notifications sent using the company's two-factor authentication (2FA) system, admitting that the messages were indeed caused by a bug. From a report: In a blog post penned by Facebook Chief Security Officer Alex Stamos, the company says the error led it to "send non-security-related SMS notifications to these phone numbers." Facebook uses the automated number 362-65, or "FBOOK," as its two-factor authentication number, which is a secure way of confirming a user's identity by sending a numeric code to a secondary device like a mobile phone. That same number ended up sending users Facebook notifications without their consent. When users would attempt to get the SMS notifications to stop, the replies were posted to their own Facebook profiles as status updates.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Most Cities Would Welcome a Tech Billionaire, But Peter Thiel?
    Sarah McBride, writing for Bloomberg: Tech billionaire Peter Thiel is moving to Los Angeles from San Francisco, adding another dose of legitimacy to a burgeoning startup scene in Southern California -- along with some controversy. The co-founder of PayPal and an early investor in Facebook, Thiel runs Founders Fund, one of the more-respected venture capital firms in Silicon Valley. He comes with a little baggage, though, including his staunch support for President Donald Trump, his secretive funding of the legal battle between Hulk Hogan and Gawker.com, and comments some people say have been derogatory toward women. "I'm not sure why Peter Thiel believes he'll receive a warmer reception on the L.A. tech scene than he's had in Silicon Valley," said Tracy DiNunzio, chief executive officer of Tradesy, a fashion-reselling company based in Santa Monica, California. "Our venture and startup ecosystem is fairly left-leaning."
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • How Does Chinese Tech Stack Up Against American Tech?
    The Economist: China's tech leaders love visiting California, and invest there, but are no longer awed by it [Editor's note: the link may be paywalled]. By market value the Middle Kingdom's giants, Alibaba and Tencent, are in the same league as Alphabet and Facebook. New stars may float their shares in 2018-19, including Didi Chuxing (taxi rides), Ant Financial (payments) and Lufax (wealth management). China's e-commerce sales are double America's and the Chinese send 11 times more money by mobile phones than Americans, who still scribble cheques. The venture-capital (VC) industry is booming. American visitors return from Beijing, Hangzhou and Shenzhen blown away by the entrepreneurial work ethic. Last year the government decreed that China would lead globally in artificial intelligence (AI) by 2030. The plan covers a startlingly vast range of activities, including developing smart cities and autonomous cars and setting global tech standards. Like Japanese industry in the 1960s, private Chinese firms take this "administrative guidance" seriously.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • LinkedIn Users Will Soon Know What Jobs Pay Before Applying for Them
    LinkedIn just introduced a way to help its members avoid going through the interview process for jobs with salaries that do not meet their expectations. From a report: The professional network announced the rollout of Salary Insights, which will add estimated or expected salary ranges to open roles, getting the numbers either through salary ranges provided by employers or estimated ranges from data submitted by members. The feature will launch "in the coming weeks." Salary Insights marks the next step after LinkedIn Salary, which the professional network launched in November 2016 to provide its users with information on salaries, bonuses and equity data for specific job titles, as well as factors that impact those salaries, including experience, industry, company size, location and education level.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • YouTube Red is Having an Identity Crisis
    During an onstage conversation at Recode's Code Media this week, YouTube CEO Susan Wojcicki called YouTube Red a music streaming service -- first time any executive from the company has referred to YouTube Red as foremost a music service. From a report: This differs from comments that other YouTube executives have made in the past, including YouTube's head of global content Susanne Daniels, who last year described YouTube Red as a premium subscription streaming service that offers Hollywood-quality shows and movies. Launched in October 2015, YouTube Red has always been positioned by YouTube as three services in one: It offers ad-free access to all of YouTube; it's a music streaming service that also gives access to Google Play Music; and it's consistently releasing original movies and TV shows, starring Hollywood talent and homegrown stars that users already subscribe to. Two years later, this has created somewhat of an identity crisis for the streaming service. As Wojcicki said in her interview, she sees YouTube Red as a music service. And she does not expect to spend billions of dollars on content to effectively compete with Netflix, Hulu, Amazon and others.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Learning To Program Is Getting Harder
    theodp writes: While Google suggests that parents and educators are to blame for why kids can't code, Allen Downey, Professor at Olin College argues that learning to program is getting harder . Downey writes: The fundamental problem is that the barrier between using a computer and programming a computer is getting higher. When I got a Commodore 64 (in 1982, I think) this barrier was non-existent. When you turned on the computer, it loaded and ran a software development environment (SDE). In order to do anything, you had to type at least one line of code, even if all it did was another program (like Archon). Since then, three changes have made it incrementally harder for users to become programmers: 1. Computer retailers stopped installing development environments by default. As a result, anyone learning to program has to start by installing an SDE -- and that's a bigger barrier than you might expect. Many users have never installed anything, don't know how to, or might not be allowed to. Installing software is easier now than it used to be, but it is still error prone and can be frustrating. If someone just wants to learn to program, they shouldn't have to learn system administration first. 2. User interfaces shifted from command-line interfaces (CLIs) to graphical user interfaces (GUIs). GUIs are generally easier to use, but they hide information from users about what's really happening. When users really don't need to know, hiding information can be a good thing. The problem is that GUIs hide a lot of information programmers need to know. So when a user decides to become a programmer, they are suddenly confronted with all the information that's been hidden from them. If someone just wants to learn to program, they shouldn't have to learn operating system concepts first. 3. Cloud computing has taken information hiding to a whole new level. People using web applications often have only a vague idea of where their data is stored and what applications they can use to access it. Many users, especially on mobile devices, don't distinguish between operating systems, applications, web browsers, and web applications. When they upload and download data, they are often confused about where is it coming from and where it is going. When they install something, they are often confused about what is being installed where. For someone who grew up with a Commodore 64, learning to program was hard enough. For someone growing up with a cloud-connected mobile device, it is much harder. theodp continues: So, with the Feds budgeting $200 million a year for K-12 CS at the behest of U.S. tech leaders, can't the tech giants at least put a BASIC on every phone/tablet/laptop for kids?
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.






  • Oi! Verizon leaked my fiancée's nude pix to her ex-coworker, says bloke
    Intimate photos somehow ended up on some other guy's mobe, lawsuit claims
    A bloke is suing Verizon Wireless in the US because, he claims, personal pictures from his Verizon phone, including intimate snaps of his fiancée, turned up on the phone of another subscriber – who happened to know her.…














  • Transport for London to toughen up on taxi firms in the Uber age
    Sort out your safety policies... oh, and share all your travel info with us
    Private-hire cab firms that want to operate in the UK capital will have to demonstrate how they protect riders' safety and data – and may still only get short-term licences, Transport for London has said.…




  • Should AI get to choose a topping in a two pizza team?
    How DevOps could be about to collide with machine learning
    DevOps is finally getting somewhere. This year the term is ten years old and like most ten-year olds, DevOps is starting to show signs of puberty and cognitive maturity. According to analyst Forrester, this is being reflected in industry. In 2017, a Forrester survey found that over 50 per cent of organisations were to implement DevOps in some form or another, enough for the analyst to claim that 2018 is going to be the year of enterprise DevOps.…



















  • Microsoft's Windows 10 Workstation adds killer feature: No Candy Crush
    Now can you remove it from every Start Menu?
    Readers with good memories may recall that when Windows NT was launched, it came in Workstation and Advanced Server editions, with the former fulfilling most duties of a server. There were no limits on TCP/IP connections, for example. Just as its developer Dave Cutler intended.…


  • Dell EMC squashes pair of VMAX virtual appliance bugs
    vApp Manager contained undocumented default account
    Dell EMC has patched two serious flaws in the management interface for its VMAX enterprise storage systems, one of which could potentially allow a remote attacker to gain unauthorised access to systems.…





  • BBC presenter loses appeal, must pay £420k in IR35 crackdown
    IT contractors warned to get house in order
    A BBC presenter must pay £419,151 in taxes after a UK tax tribunal ruled her contract should have been subject to IR35 legislation – a judgment that has been described as a wake-up call for IT freelancers.…


  • Robot cars will kill London jobs – but only from 2030, say politicans
    London Assembly report shines light on UK.gov's auto auto plans
    The London Assembly has lashed out at driverless cars, declaring that autonomous vehicles could cause "significant job losses" – while figures from the UK's driverless car industry told it that they don't expect Level 4 or 5 (fully autonomous) tech to hit the streets for another decade or more.…



  • Mobile phone dealer boss faces 12 years in director limbo
    Did somebody say VAT fraud? Yes, the Insolvency Service did
    The boss of an Oxford-based mobile phone dealer who used a carousel scam to defraud the British tax collector from hundreds of thousands of pounds was today banned from holding directorships for 12 years.…





Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM