Recent Changes - Search:
NTLUG

Linux is free.
Life is good.

Linux Training
10am on Meeting Days!

1825 Monetary Lane Suite #104 Carrollton, TX

Do a presentation at NTLUG.

What is the Linux Installation Project?

Real companies using Linux!

Not just for business anymore.

Providing ready to run platforms on Linux

Show Descriptions... (Show All) (Single Column)

  • Red Hat: 2016:2850-01: thunderbird: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for thunderbird is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact [More...]






  • Fedora 25 phpMyAdmin-4.6.5.1-2.fc25
    LinuxSecurity.com: phpMyAdmin 4.6.5.1 (2016-11-26) =============================== A patch-levelrelease fixing two small issues: * an issue affecting a small number of usersusing $cfg['Servers'][$i]['hide_db'] or $cfg['Servers'][$i]['only_db']. * anissue affecting the create table dialog where the partition selection tool wasoverzealous and made it difficult to create a new table. There are also minorimprovements to the Czech language file. phpMyAdmin 4.6.5 (2016-11-25)============================= A release containing security fixes and bugfixes. Aside from the security improvements, many bugs have been fixedincluding: * Fix for expanding in navigation pane * Reintroduced asimplified version of PmaAbsoluteUri directive (needed with reverse proxies) *Fix editing of ENUM/SET/DECIMAL field structures * Improvements to the parserAnd many, many more. Please see the ChangeLog for full details of bugs fixes.




  • Fedora 25 xen-4.7.1-3.fc25
    LinuxSecurity.com: xen : various security flaws (#1397383) x86 null segments not always treated asunusable [XSA-191, CVE-2016-9386] x86 task switch to VM86 mode mis-handled[XSA-192, CVE-2016-9382] x86 segment base write emulation lacking canonicaladdress checks [XSA-193, CVE-2016-9385] guest 32-bit ELF symbol table loadleaking host data [XSA-194, CVE-2016-9384] x86 64-bit bit test instructionemulation broken [XSA-195, CVE-2016-9383] x86 software interrupt injection mis-handled [XSA-196, CVE-2016-9377, CVE-2016-9378] qemu incautious about sharedring processing [XSA-197, CVE-2016-9381] delimiter injection vulnerabilities inpygrub [XSA-198, CVE-2016-9379, CVE-2016-9380]





  • Samsung victorious at Supreme Court fight with 8-0 opinion against Apple
    For the first time in a century, the US Supreme Court has weighed in on how much design patents are worth. The answer: not nearly as much as Apple thinks.The 8-0 opinion (PDF) is a rebuke to the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit, which held that the relevant "article of manufacture" for calculating damages was—in fact, had to be—the entire smartphone. That meant even though Apple's patents covered only certain design elements, it was entitled to $399 million in lost profits damages.


  • Open spec SBC dual boots Android and Ubuntu on hexa-core RK3399
    T-Firefly is Kickstartering the first hacker SBC with Rockchip’s Cortex-A72/-A53 RK3399. The Firefly-RK3399 has up to 4GB DDR3, M.2, and USB 3.0 Type-C. T-Firefly, which offers Linux- and Android-ready open source boards like the Firefly-RK3288 and sandwich-style Firefly-RK3288 Reload, ........



  • How to install Docker and run Docker containers on Fedora 25
    Docker is an open source project supported by a commercial entity of the same name that makes it super-easy to run an application process inside a relatively isolated environment called a container. Unlike a virtual machine (VM), which has its own kernel, a container is dependent on the host operating system’s kernel.



  • ROSA Desktop Fresh R8 Plasma 5: is it near-perfect?
    The most recent release of ROSA is now ROSA Desktop Fresh R8, which is available in several flavours: MATE, GNOME 3, KDE 4 and Plasma 5. I decided to try the Plasma 5 edition of this distribution, especially as my interest to Plasma increased after the good impression Kubuntu 16.10 left on me.




  • How to setup rsyslog for Centralized Log Management
    This tutorial explains how to setup rsyslog as a centralized log management server on RedHat Linux based OS like CentOS. Centralized log management means to collect all sorts of logs from several physical or virtualized servers on one log server to monitor the health and security of the server services. We use rsyslog in this tutorial because it offers high-performance, great security and a modular design.




  • Now available: The Open Organization Leaders Manual
    Organizations are becoming more open—but that certainly doesn't mean they don't need leaders.In fact, the demand for effective leadership hasn't abated in the age of the networked organization. If anything, it's increased. But yesterday's leadership strategies and tactics just won't cut it today.The open organization community at Opensource.com understands this—perhaps more acutely than anyone. So we've written a book about it.read more


  • Transitioning to Python 3
    The Python language, which is not new but continues to gain momentumand users as if it were, has changed remarkably little since itfirst was released. I don't mean to say that Python hasn't changed; ithas grown, gaining functionality and speed, and it's now a hotlanguage in a variety of domains, from data science to test automationto education.


  • How to gain encrypted email on the Chromebook
    I needed to use encryption on my Chromebook. For the longest time I was working with encryption apps, like Minilock. Eventually it became clear this wasn't the most efficient use of my time. So I waited for a better solution.


  • 7 cool little open source projects that stood out in 2016
    In the early days of the open source movement, a lot of the attention was on operating systems, and later on large content management systems. These days, containers are mentioned regularly even in mainstream news outlets. The big tech stories are great, but they miss the other great activity in the niches of the open source space. I've rounded up seven interesting lesser-known projects from the past year. You can see more articles about projects like this in my Nooks and Crannies column.read more



  • Rugged Skylake embedded PC has wide range power
    Axiomtek’s “eBOX565-500-FL” computer runs Linux or Windows on dual-core Intel 6th Gen CPUs, and offers four USB 3.0 ports and wide-range power. The eBOX565-500-FL updates the two-year-old eBOX560-880-FL embedded PC, which provides dual-core Intel 4th Gen “Haswell” Core and Celeron CPUs. The very similar eBOX565-500-FL instead taps the 14nm Intel 6th Gen “Skylake” ULT processors, […]





Error: It's not possible to reach RSS file http://www.newsforge.com/index.rss ...

  • The Pessimist’s Guide To 2017
    From social breakdown in the US to a nuclear crisis in North Korea to the defeat of Angela Merkel in Germany, the potential for chaos is just as great. These aren’t predictions. But they show what your social-media news feed could look like if things go wrong.




  • In The Market For A Minimalist Wallet?
    Is your wallet the width of a meatball sub? Time to simplify. The Ridge Wallet is a slim, RFID-blocking wallet that will hold up to 15 cards and has a modular design for easy access. It's made from aluminum, titanium or carbon fiber and, as you can see, looks pretty damn sharp.





  • Home Is Where The Art Is
    Charles Stagg walked into the woods and decided to build something. Now, four years after his death, his daughter and grandson are trying to preserve his masterpiece.




  • This LED Covered Car Is LIT AF
    In a collaboration on a music video with singer Dua Lipa, Lexus covered a Lexus IS in a half-mile of LED strips to create the "LIT IS" — an advertisement, sure, but this is car art (car-t, if you will). Plus, you can't buy this glow-y accident magnet.






  • Van Jones Knows What We Have To Do Next
    Mark Anthony Green speaks with the man who comforted liberal America on election night about everything: why it all went wrong, the difference between bigots and Trump voters, and where we go from here.





  • One Huge Trailer For All The Movies Of 2016
    What a year it has been: "Independence Day" made an unfortunate resurgence, Robert DeNiro was the "Dirty Grandpa" you never asked for, a pair of "Nice Guys" won our heart and Daniel Radcliffe made for a surprisingly good farting corpse.






  • Sprint Owner SoftBank Says It'll Invest $50 Billion In US Under Trump
    SoftBank CEO Masayoshi Son said at Trump Tower Tuesday that he'd worked out a deal with the president-elect to invest $50 billion in the US over the next four years and create 50,000 new jobs. Details of the planned investment are basically nonexistent, but it’s more than likely that it involves Sprint, which represents SoftBank’s main presence in the US.








  • Price Drop On A Great Holiday Gag Gift
    When you gotta go, you gotta go. And sometimes that means in the middle of the night. Just snap this bad boy onto the rim of your toilet and let that sweet LED-with-motion-sensor light shine.









  • The Clam That Sank A Thousand Ships
    Shipworms, tunneling bivalves with a voracious appetite for wood, have terrorized ships for centuries, and ocean conditions are shifting towards making them even more of a problem.


  • Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau Makes Game For Third Annual Hour of Code
    Eloking writes: Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's Twitter account lit up today with a message all too familiar to many indie devs: Mr. Trudeau has made a video game, and he'd like everyone to play it. It was a cute bit of promotion for Hour of Code, the computer science education event masterminded every year by the Code.org nonprofit. While the Hour of Code websites hosts one-hour tutorials (in 45 languages) for coding all sorts of simple applications, game developers may appreciate that the lion's share appears to be game projects, like the one Trudeau modified into a sort of hockey-themed Breakout variant.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • NASA Awards $127 Million Contract For Refueling Mission Spacecraft
    Satellites cost millions of dollars to be launched into space and there's no guarantee that they will work without electrical or mechanical problems once in orbit. NASA has recently announced that it will award a $127 million contract to a company that aims to use a robotic spacecraft to fix satellites in space, thus potentially saving millions of dollars in the long-run by fixing satellites that would otherwise be "expensive e-waste." Gizmodo reports: NASA has just announced that it will award a $127 million contract to the California-based satellite company Space Systems/Loral for Restore-L, a robotic spacecraft capable of grasping, refueling and relocating a satellite in low Earth orbit, in addition to testing technologies for future missions. SSL has three years to build the bot, which is projected to launch in 2020. Without the ability to refuel, a satellite's lifespan is restricted by the amount of propellant engineers can pack in its tank at launch. That lifespan can be cut even shorter should the spacecraft encounter any electrical or mechanical problems on orbit. As more and more satellites reach the end of their operational lifespans, government agencies and private companies have been working to remedy this problem by developing robots that can give satellites a tune-up in zero-gravity. DARPA, for instance, recently launched a program aimed at designing robots capable of servicing satellites at the hard-to-reach but highly-desirable perch of geosynchronous orbit, 22,000 miles above Earth. NASA's Satellite Servicing Division, meanwhile, has a handful of on-orbit repair and refueling technology demonstrators in the works, including a robotic arm with the same range of motion as a human arm, a navigation system designed to help robots rendezvous with moving objects in space, and Restore-L, which combines these and other capabilities into a multi-purpose space mechanic. For now, Restore-L's primary goal is to refuel Landsat 7, a critical Earth-monitoring satellite operated by NASA and the U.S. Geological Survey. If successful, the spacecraft may be modified for all sorts of other useful tasks, from mopping up the ever-growing halo of space junk encircling our planet, to servicing exciting new science missions like the Asteroid Redirect Mission, which will grab a multi-ton boulder from the surface of an asteroid and tow it back to orbit around the Moon.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • 'The Circle' Trailer Looks An Awful Lot Like Google
    theodp writes: If you never got around to reading Dave Eggers' novel The Circle, the tale of a powerful tech company that bears a more-than-passing resemblance to Google (and has an Apple spaceship-like HQ) is coming to the big screen and the first trailer is out. The film has a release date of spring 2017, and stars Tom Hanks, Emma Watson and John Boyega. Remember, sharing is caring!
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Microsoft Researchers Offer Predictions For AI, Deep Learning
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Verge: Microsoft polled 17 women working in its research organization about the technology advances they expect to see in 2017, as well as a decade later in 2027. The researchers' predictions touch on natural language processing, machine learning, agricultural software, and virtual reality, among other topics. For virtual reality, Mar Gonzalez Franco, a researcher in Microsoft's Redmond lab, believes body tracking will improve next year, and then over the next decade we'll have "rich multi-sensorial experiences that will be capable of producing hallucinations which blend or alter perceives reality." Haptic devices will simulate touch to further enhance the sensory experience. Meanwhile, Susan Dumais, a scientist and deputy managing director at the Redmond lab, believes deep learning will help improve web search results next year. In 2027, however, the search box will disappear, she says. It'll be replaced by search that's more "ubiquitous, embedded, and contextually sensitive." She says we're already seeing some of this in voice-controlled searches through mobile and smart home devices. We might eventually be able to look things up with either sound, images, or video. Plus, our searches will respond to "current location, content, entities, and activities" without us explicitly mentioning them, she says. Of course, it's worth noting that Microsoft has been losing the search box war to Google, so it isn't surprising that the company thinks search will die. With global warming as a looming threat, Asta Roseway, principal research designer, says by 2027 famers will use AI to maintain healthy crop yields, even with "climate change, drought, and disaster." Low-energy farming solutions, like vertical farming and aquaponics, will also be essential to keeping the food supply high, she says. You can view all 17 predictions here.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Weather Channel To Breitbart: Stop Citing Us To Spread Climate Skepticism
    Breitbart.com published an article last week that erroneously claims global warming is coming to an end, claiming "global land temperatures have plummeted by 1 degree Celsius since the middle of the year -- the biggest and steepest fall on record." The Weather Channel finds this report especially upsetting as it's not only inaccurate but it features a video from weather.com at the top of the article. The Weather Channel reports: Breitbart had the legal right to use this clip as part of a content-sharing agreement with another company, but there should be no assumption that The Weather Company endorses the article associated with it. The Breitbart article -- a prime example of cherry picking, or pulling a single item out of context to build a misleading case -- includes this statement: "The last three years may eventually come to be seen as the final death rattle of the global warming scare." In fact, thousands of researchers and scientific societies are in agreement that greenhouse gases produced by human activity are warming the planet's climate and will keep doing so. Along with its presence on the high-profile Breitbart site, the article drew even more attention after a link to it was retweeted by the U.S. House Committee on Science, Space, and Technology. The Breitbart article heavily references a piece that first appeared on U.K. Daily Mail's site. The Weather Channel went on to refute the Breitbart article's hypothesis: This number comes from one satellite-based estimate of temperatures above land areas in the lower atmosphere. Data from the other two groups that regularly publish satellite-based temperature estimates show smaller drops, more typical of the decline one would expect after a strong El Nino event. Temperatures over land give an incomplete picture of global-scale temperature. Most of the planet -- about 70 percent -- is covered by water, and the land surface warms and cools more quickly than the ocean. Land-plus-ocean data from the other two satellite groups, released after the Breitbart article, show that Earth's lower atmosphere actually set a record high in November 2016.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Apple Launches Single Sign-On Service To Make Logging Into TV Apps Less Time-Consuming
    Apple has launched Single Sign-on, a service designed to make logging into TV apps much less annoying. It "allows cable subscribers to sign in once with their cable credentials to gain access to all cable-restricted content in iOS and tvOS apps," writes Juli Clover via MacRumors: Single Sign-on is limited to the United States, and according to a support document, is available for the following providers: CenturyLink Prism, DirecTV, Dish, GVTC, GTA, Hawaiian Telecom, Hotwire, MetroCast, and Sling. While Single Sign-on was introduced and tested in the tvOS 10.1 and iOS 10.2 betas, the feature was remotely released today to all iOS 10 and tvOS 10 devices. Using Single Sign-on does not require one of the betas, and is instead immediately available to all iPhone and Apple TV users running iOS 10 or tvOS 10. With Single Sign-on, customers with a supported provider will use the Settings options in iOS or tvOS to sign in with their cable credentials. From then on, when accessing a supported app that requires a cable subscription, the app will ask to use the saved sign-on credentials. Most cable channels and content providers offer individual apps on the Apple TV and iOS devices, but still require cable authentication before users can access content. Prior to Single Sign-on, customers were required to enter their credentials in each individual app, a frustrating and time-consuming process.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • New Stegano Exploit Kit Hides Malvertising Code In Banner Pixels
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from BleepingComputer: For the past two months, a new exploit kit has been serving malicious code hidden in the pixels of banner ads via a malvertising campaign that has been active on several high profile websites. Discovered by security researchers from ESET, this new exploit kit is named Stegano, from the word steganography, which is a technique of hiding content inside other files. In this particular scenario, malvertising campaign operators hid malicious code inside PNG images used for banner ads. The crooks took a PNG image and altered the transparency value of several pixels. They then packed the modified image as an ad, for which they bought ad displays on several high-profile websites. Since a large number of advertising networks allow advertisers to deliver JavaScript code with their ads, the crooks also included JS code that would parse the image, extract the pixel transparency values, and using a mathematical formula, convert those values into a character. Since images have millions of pixels, crooks had all the space they needed to pack malicious code inside a PNG photo. When extracted, this malicious code would redirect the user to an intermediary ULR, called gate, where the host server would filter users. This server would only accept connections from Internet Explorer users. The reason is that the gate would exploit the CVE-2016-0162 vulnerability that allowed the crooks to determine if the connection came from a real user or a reverse analysis system employed by security researchers. Additionally, this IE exploit also allowed the gate server to detect the presence of antivirus software. In this case, the server would drop the connection just to avoid exposing its infrastructure and trigger a warning that would alert both the user and the security firm. If the gate server deemed the target valuable, then it would redirect the user to the final stage, which was the exploit kit itself, hosted on another URL. The Stegano exploit kit would use three Adobe Flash vulnerabilities (CVE-2015-8651, CVE-2016-1019 or CVE-2016-4117) to attack the user's PC, and forcibly download and launch into execution various strains of malware.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Former Samsung Engineers Build Smart Umbrella That Tells If It's Going To Rain
    A team of former Samsung engineers have developed a smart umbrella, dubbed Opus One, that tells its owner if it's going to rain with the shake of the handle. International Business Times reports: Developed by a team of former Samsung engineers, Opus One smart umbrella works when it is connected to the smartphone via Bluetooth 4.1 through its companion app Jonas. The device gets weather reports every morning from credible sources and sends alert to its owner when its handle is shaken. Red light on the device indicates rain on that particular day, while a green one indicates clear skies. Jonas collects weather data of select cities and sends the information to Opus One smart umbrella, thus helping the owner to know if it's going to rain on a particular day. The device notifies its owner by vibrating if the smartphone connected to the app receives calls, emails or text messages. The smart umbrella also vibrates if its owner leaves behind the smartphone that is connected to it before the user gets too far away. The smartphone too will vibrate and alert its owner if the smart umbrella is left behind. This will help prevent loss of both the products. The umbrella runs on AAA batteries and costs about $105.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Scientists Develop Robotic Hand For People With Quadriplegia
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from Phys.Org: Scientists have developed a mind-controlled robotic hand that allows people with certain types of spinal injuries to perform everyday tasks such as using a fork or drinking from a cup. The low-cost device was tested in Spain on six people with quadriplegia affecting their ability to grasp or manipulate objects. By wearing a cap that measures electric brain activity and eye movement the users were able to send signals to a tablet computer that controlled the glove-like device attached to their hand. Participants in the small-scale study were able to perform daily activities better with the robotic hand than without, according to results published Tuesday in the journal Science Robotics. It took participants just 10 minutes to learn how to use the system before they were able to carry out tasks such as picking up potato chips or signing a document. According to Surjo R. Soekadar, a neuroscientist at the University Hospital Tuebingen in Germany and lead author of the study, participants represented typical people with high spinal cord injuries, meaning they were able to move their shoulders but not their fingers. There were some limitations to the system, though. Users had to have sufficient function in their shoulder and arm to reach out with the robotic hand. And mounting the system required another person's help.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Apple Says Air Exposure Is Causing iPhone 6s Battery Problems
    Last month, Apple announced a repair program for a "small number" of iPhone 6s phones that suffer from faulty batteries. The phones that were affected by this fault were manufactured between September and October 2015. Two weeks later, Apple now says the fault was caused by overexposure to "controlled ambient air." Ars Technica reports: The same press release -- issued only in China so far, but available in English if you scroll down -- says that some owners of later iPhone 6S models are also reporting problems with unexpected shutdowns. Apple isn't replacing those batteries just yet, but the company says that an iOS update "available next week" will add "additional diagnostic capability" that will allow Apple to better track down and diagnose the causes of these shutdowns. It "may potentially help [Apple] improve the algorithms used to manage battery performance and shutdown," as well. Those improvements will be included in future iOS updates. Apple says that the battery problem "is not a safety issue," an important thing to note given the way the Galaxy Note 7 blew up in Samsung's face. The software update that Apple mentions in the release is almost certainly iOS 10.2, which is currently in its sixth beta build. The update will be the first major bug-fix release since October's iOS 10.1, and it also includes a handful of other changes like new and redesigned emoji, the TV app that Apple demoed at its last product event, and other features.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Apple To Start Publishing AI Research To Hasten Deep Learning
    In what is a major deviation in its strategy, Apple will allow its artificial intelligence teams to publish research papers for the first time. From a report on Bloomberg: When Apple introduced its Siri virtual assistant in 2011, the company appeared to have a head start over many of its nearest competitors. But it has lost ground since then to the likes of Alphabet's Google Assistant and Amazon's Alexa. Researchers say among the reasons Apple has failed to keep pace is its unwillingness to allow its AI engineers to publish scientific papers, stymieing its ability to feed off wider advances in the field. That policy has now changed, Russ Salakhutdinov, an Apple director of AI research, said Monday at the Neural Information Processing Systems conference in Barcelona. One attendee posted a photo of a slide from Salakhutdinov's presentation stating "Can we publish? Yes. Do we engage with academia? Yes."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • T-Mobile CFO: Less Regulation, Repeal of Net Neutrality By Trump Would Be 'Positive For My Industry'
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from TmoNews: T-Mobile CFO Braxton Carter spoke at the UBS Global Media and Communications Conference in New York City, and he touched a bit on President-elect Donald Trump and what his election could mean for the mobile industry. Carter expects that a Trump presidency will foster an environment that'll be more positive for wireless. "It's hard to imagine, with the way the election turned out, that we're not going to have an environment, from several aspects, that is not going to be more positive for my industry," the CFO said. He went on to explain that there will likely be less regulation, something that he feels "destroys innovation and value creation." Speaking of innovation, Carter also feels that a reversal of net neutrality and the FCC's Open Internet rules would be good for innovation in the industry, saying that it "would provide opportunity for significant innovation and differentiation" and that it'd enable you to "do some very interesting things."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Some Children's Headphones Raise Concerns of Hearing Loss, Report Says
    Some headphones marketed for children may not restrict enough noise for young ears. From a report on ABC: The Wirecutter, a technology products review website (owned by the New York Times), tried out 30 different children's headphones for style, fit and safety by using both a plastic model ear and a few real children. "There's no governing board that oversees this," Lauren Dragan, the Headphone Editor at The Wirecutter, told "Good Morning America" in an interview that aired today. Dragan added that the headphones for children all claim to limit volume to around 85 decibels. Sound below the 85 decibel mark for a maximum of eight hours is considered safe, according to the World Health Organization. The Wirecutter report found that some of these headphones emit sound higher than the 85 decibel mark. The full report here.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Vinyl Records Outsold Digital Downloads In the UK Last Week
    Sales of vinyl outstripped those of downloaded music for the first time since the advent of digital downloads last week in the UK. From a report on AdWeek: The U.K.-based Entertainment Retailers Association, or ERA, said Monday that Britons spent 2.4 million pounds ($3.03 million) on the old-school wax last week while only doling out 2.1 million pounds ($2.65 million) for digital downloads. Vinyl Factory, a website dedicated to records, reported that those numbers represent a big change from the same week in 2015, when just 1.2 million pounds was spent on records compared with 4.4 million on digital downloads. That's a 100 percent year-over-year increase in vinyl sales and also the first time that vinyl album sales have bested digital downloads over a weeklong period in years, per Vinyl Factory. The surge in vinyl sales could be attributed to the popularity of vinyl as a Christmas gift and the growing number of retailers. You know it's a gift because, as BBC adds: But 48% of those surveyed said they did not play the vinyl they bought -- while 7% did not even own a turntable.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Samsung's Upcoming Galaxy S8 Flagship Smartphone Won't Have a Headphone Jack: Report
    Samsung is planning to ditch headphone jack in its next flagship smartphone, called the Samsung Galaxy S8, reports SamMobile, a Samsung-focused blog that has a pretty good track record with these things. From the report: Removing the 3.5mm headphone jack enables Samsung to make the Galaxy S8 thinner while also freeing up more space inside for a bigger battery. Samsung may also integrate stereo speakers which some believe will be made in collaboration with Harman, a company that Samsung is acquiring for $8 billion.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • So, who is the cluster bomb? Student results sliced, diced, analysed
    And maybe over-analysed too
    HPC Blog It's time to close the books on another highly successful SC Student Cluster Competition. This year was special in a number of ways. First, it was the event's 10th anniversary. At 14 teams, it was also the largest SC competition ever – a far cry from the original five. SC16 was also noteworthy in terms of the performance achieved (more than twice the existing LINPACK record) and the wide variety of cluster configurations designed by the student participants.…



  • Russia's bid for mobile self-sufficiency may be the saviour of Sailfish
    Comrades: We present your official alternative to Android
    Comment The quest for freedom from US technologies and patent fees has been a persistent theme in China and has helped shape the new mobile landscape, in which Baidu and Alibaba, not Google and Amazon, dominate the user experience. Less is heard about another massive market, Russia, but here too, the push for technology self-sufficiency is gathering momentum, creating opportunities for alternatives to Android and iOS.…


  • I was a robot and this is what I learned
    The internet of me
    Sysadmin blog For one brief instant, Microsoft was the good guy. Deep within the often customer-hostile behemoth, left after the arrogance and straight on past the victim blaming is the office of Brian First, with the Microsoft Experience Design Group. Alongside a company called Event Presence, Brian made me feel like a real person, actual and whole.…





  • Uber is watching your smartphone's battery charge
    Browser vendors' Battery API deprecation can't come soon enough
    Browser authors are abandoning the invasive Battery API W3C specification, but not everybody's got the memo: Uber, for example, still watches battery status.…



  • Microsoft says LinkedIn will make Trump, Brexit, voters feel great again
    We can't make this stuff up – Microsoft said this after Europe okayed its LinkedIn acquisition
    Microsoft says buying LinkedIn will help to address the middle class discontent that saw Britain vote to leave the European Union and America vote to leave politics as we know it behind by electing Donald Trump.…


  • Two top EMCers bail from Dell EMC
    Official line is they want to be CEOs elsewhere. Or is the culture change chafing?
    Two of EMC's most senior product line executives have resigned, deciding that Michael Dell's Dell Technologies and the David Goulden-run Dell EMC business unit is not their ideal future workplace.…


  • Brocade ships switches but makes most noise about DevOps
    Goodbye drudgery - now you can script up your networking business workflows
    There's a few shiny boxes in the announcement, but Broadcom-bound Brocade hopes punters will find its automation software and DevOps story even more sparkly than its new kit.…



  • Android, Qualcomm move on insecure GPS almanac downloads
    HTTPS? They've heard of it
    Nearly a decade after it introduced assisted-GPS in its mobile chipsets, Qualcomm has squished a bug that allowed miscreants to mess around with people's location services, or crash their phones.…


  • Open source Roundcube webmail can be attacked ... by sending it an e-mail
    The Fifth Element is a problem - the input argument that didn't get checked is an RCE hole
    The developers of open source webmail package Roundcube want sysadmins to push in a patch, because a bug in versions prior to 1.2.3 let an attacker crash it remotely – by sending what looks like valid e-mail data.…



  • Big Blue's Bluemix bellows 'We do DevOps too!' until blue in face
    IBM adds deployment and testing toolchain templates
    Hoping to make its Bluemix rent-a-cloud more accommodating for rapid application development and deployment, IBM on Tuesday added three new services designed to accommodate development – and operations-oriented toolchains.…


  • Erasure coding startup springs forth from Silicon Fjord
    Viking raider's longboat filled with erasure codes
    Analysis Memoscale is a 6-person Norwegian startup, based in Trondheim, that has developed its own erasure coding (EC) technology. It says it's more efficient than classic erasure coding because it needs fewer hardware resources to run and enables higher storage capacity utilization.…


  • Australia's universal telco service obligation's day is done
    Productivity Commission wonders just what Telstra is doing with the AU$3bn it's being paid to put phones everywhere
    Australia's Productivity Commission (PC) has suggested the nation can probably scrap the telecommunications universal service obligation (TUSO) that requires every Australian be provided with a telephone connection.…


  • Wannabe Cali governor gives up against beach-blocking billionaire VC
    Gavin Newsom pleads with Vinod Khosla to end dispute over much-loved shoreline
    With one eye on the governorship of California in 2018, Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom backed down from a fight with billionaire VC Vinod Khosla on Tuesday over controversial access to a beach.…


  • Verizon flogs off 29 data centers, pockets $3.6bn
    Equinix takes over bit-barns as telco shifts focus to wireless and fiber
    Verizon has finalized a deal to hand over control of 29 data centers in the US and Latin America to Equinix, in a deal that will net the telco $3.6bn.…



  • cat Infinit.tgz | docker import - Infinit:acquired
    Paris biz gobbled, 'batteries' for distributed storage to be included with Docker containers
    Docker, creator of easy-to-use software containers for applications and all-round DevOps darling, is adding a storage option to its software.…



  • Algorithm advance alleviates AI amnesia
    Did you know machine-learning systems are pretty forgetful when picking up new skills? Here's how to fix it
    Analysis Google-stablemate DeepMind thinks it is one step closer to cracking artificial general intelligence with an algorithm that helps machines overcome memory loss.…



  • We grill another storage startup that's meshing about with NVMe
    Says virtual NVMe-based SAN beats shared NVMe drive aaray
    Interview Storage startup Excelero is supportive of NVMe drives and of NVMe over fabrics-style networking. It has a unique way of using NVMe drives to create a virtual SAN accessed by RDMA. An upcoming NASA Ames case study will describe how its NVMesh technology works in more detail.…






  • Ofcom fleshes out plans to open up BT's ducts and poles
    Come lay your fibre in BT's pipes, says regulator
    UK comms watchdog Ofcom has fleshed out its proposals to open up BT's ducts and poles - intended to encourage rivals to access Openreach's infrastructure and lay their own "full fibre" networks.…


  • Going underground: The Royal Mail's great London train squeeze
    Uber cars, Amazon drones? Pah! Driverless deliveries from a different age
    Geek's Guide to Britain For the last 13 years, a tiny train tunnel running through the centre of London has remained empty and unused, maintained by just four engineers. But these engineers don’t work for Transport for London or Network Rail – they work for the Royal Mail.…


  • The future of the data centre is within
    Location, location, location
    Promo Future-proofing your data centre is no longer down to a choice of the right servers and storage, it’s now all about connectivity, location and the neighbours.…



  • How to solve your Microsoft storage challenges with All-Flash NVMe
    Tune into SuperMicro, Microsoft and Intel webinar explainer, Dec 6
    Promo Listen to the tech pundits and they will tell you that storage is no longer the bottleneck in your system performance. Or to be more precise, storage does not have to be a bottleneck anymore - so long as you adopt NVM Express (NVMe) the next generation specification for accessing non-volatile memory such as flash. And then you need to be able to implement the technology properly.…




  • NASA's hyperwall wonderwall uses virtual flash SAN
    Distributed NVMe SAN solves slow off-node access latency issues
    Case study How do get fast parallel data access to 128 compute nodes doing simulation processing off a slow, although massively parallel access data set?…





  • In the three years since IETF said pervasive monitoring is an attack, what's changed?
    IETF Security director Stephen Farrell offers a report card on evolving defences
    Feature After three years of work on making the Internet more secure, the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) still faces bottlenecks: ordinary peoples' perception of risk, sysadmins worried about how to manage encrypted networks, and – more even than state snooping – an advertising-heavy 'net business model that relies on collecting as much information as possible.…


  • Software can be more secure, says NIST, and we think we know how
    Standards org's wish-list probably looks a bit like yours
    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has completed its long-running research into cutting software vulnerabilities and dropped the big envelope into the White House letterbox.…


  • Standards body warned SMS 2FA is insecure and nobody listened
    Duo Security says NIST's advice to deprecate out-of-band passwords has been ignored
    The US National Institute of Standards and Technology's (NIST) advice that SMS is a poor way to deliver two factor authentication is having little impact, according to Duo Security.…



  • Online advent calendar offers mystery VM every day until Christmas
    QEMU serves up festive feast of OS images and oddities like Forth scripts
    Here's something fun for Christmas: the folks behind the free and open-source hosted QEMU hypervisor have whipped up an online advent calendar that offers you a new virtual machine to download every day between now and Christmas.…





Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM