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  • Red Hat: 2016:1098-01: jq: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for jq is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 6.0 (Juno) for RHEL 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2016:1099-01: jq: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for jq is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 7.0 (Kilo) for RHEL 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact [More...]



  • Red Hat: 2016:1096-01: kernel: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for kernel is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.4 Advanced Update Support. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact [More...]











  • How to open a TCP/UDP socket in a bash shell
    Suppose you want to open a TCP/UDP socket on a Linux server for various reasons. For example, you want to check if a specific address/port is reachable. Or you want to fetch a remote web page or invoke a restful API for testing. Or you want to connect to a remote IRC server, etc.


  • Pointless features add to browser bloat and insecurity
    83 per cent of browser features are used by under one per cent of top websites. It might be time for the warlocks of the Web and brewers of JavaScript to revisit their ever-burgeoning developer wish-lists and sweep away the rubbish.


  • Why a Buffer developer open sourced his code
    ?If you look for the official definition of open source, you'll likely stumble upon this outline from the board members of the Open Source Initiative. If you skim through it, you're sure to find some idea or concept that you feel very aligned with. At its heart, openness (and open source) is about free distribution—putting your work out there for others to use.




  • Linux Containers vs. VMs: A Security Comparison
    More vulnerable than virtual machines? In fact, containers have some security advantages. Developers love containers. They're easy to use and fast to start. You can run a lot of them on even simple hardware. Startup overhead has always been a bane of development and testing, and this overhead only increases with microservices architectures.


  • Petros Koutoupis' RapidDisk
    RapidDisk is an open-source and enhanced Linux RAM drive solution led by BDFLPetros Koutoupis (who also writes for Linux Journal) that allows users to create, resize a


  • CentOS 7 KDE: not for home users
    CentOS is one of those operating systems in the Linux world that are often recommended for students who want to continue their career as Linux system administrators. There is no wonder here, because CentOS is a re-branded compilation of the corporate operating systems leader RedHat.



  • Q4OS 1.4.10 Screenshot Tour
    Q4OS 1.4.10 is available. Q4OS is a Debian-based desktop Linux distribution designed to offer classic-style user interface (Trinity) and simple accessories, and to serve stable APIs for complex third-party applications, such as Google Chrome, VirtualBox and development tools. The system is also very useful for virtual cloud environments due to its very low hardware requirements.


  • Ask Safia: How do I move from a proprietary software background into open source?
    Ask Safia is the place to go for answers to your open source community-related questions. Whether you are nervous about submitting your first pull request to a project, or wondering how to write effective bug reports, Safia is here to help with practical, detailed, beginner-friendly answers. So what are you waiting for? Ask Safia.Dear Safia,I really want to start getting involved with open source, but I’ve spent my entire development career working with proprietary platforms and software. How will I be able to get started with open source?read more


  • A Look at Android Apps on Chromebook
    While the initial reaction from the FOSS community to Android Apps on Chromebooks will probably be a little cooler than lukewarm, the fact is that this might eventually be good for free and open source software.




  • Empower SMTP With Postscreen: Part 1
    I recently read with interest that the powerful mail transfer agent (MTA) that is Postfix has introduced a relatively new addition to its load mitigation and anti-spam arsenal.


  • OpenSUSE Administation with Zypper
    This tutorial shows the steps to install and update OpenSUSE packages with Zypper. Zypper is the command line package manager for openSUSE, introduced in openSUSE 10.2 which uses the libzypp library. Zypper provides a command line interface to manage repositories, the software installation, packages, patches, verifying dependencies etc.


  • Getting started with Espruino, a JavaScript interpreter for microcontrollers
    If you've used microcontrollers like the Arduino before, you mightbe used to pushingcompiled code onto the device and then just hoping it does what it's supposed to. The chip is literally a black box:If you don't add print statements (or they don't get a chance to execute),you'll have no idea what your code is doing (or even if it's doing anything at all).read more



  • Additional YUM Repositories for CentOS, RHEL & Fedora Systems
    Additional YUM Repositories will help users to install packages easily to CentOS, RHEL & Fedora Systems from third party repository such as ELRepo, IUS Community Repository, EPEL Repository, REMI Repository, Repoforg Repository, RPMforge Repository, RPMFusion Repository, Ulyaoth Repository


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  • The Olympics Of Hair
    Hair competitions are those of skill and speed. They're about pushing the fundamentals of coloring, cutting, and styling to their logical conclusion and producing something fantastical.




  • These Are Some Next-Level Loafers
    Made with hand-cut, breathable leather and a cushioned insole, Nisolo has designed a modern (and comfy) take on the classic penny loafer. Designed in Nashville and ethically produced in Peru, each pair is made with local materials by local artisans.









  • Can You Carbo-Load Your Way To Good Health?
    A revolution is afoot in bakeries across the country. With highly processed flour giving way to freshly milled whole grains rich in nutrients as well as flavor, it might just be OK to love bread again.




  • Why Longtime Couples' Health Get In Sync
    We think of aging as something we do alone, the changes unfolding according to each person's own traits and experiences. But researchers are learning that as we age in relationships, we change biologically to become more like our partners than we were in the beginning.






  • A $150,000 Fish
    Known for its agile body, sleek shiny scales and the "whiskers" that give it a resemblance to a Chinese dragon, demand for theSapphire Golden Arowanais sohigh that people have paid up to $150,000 — or killed someone else — for one.


  • Fitbit Trackers Are 'Highly Inaccurate,' Study Finds
    Comparative results from rest and exercise — including jump rope, treadmills, outdoor jogging and stair climbing — showed that the Fitbit devices miscalculated heart rates by up to 20 beats per minute on average during more intensive workouts.



  • The Many Ways The Media Gets Around Saying [Groin]
    It’s the oldest laugh in sports: Some poor schmoe takes a sports ball to the crotch, keels over and, once we’re reasonably sure no lasting damage has been done, the TV announcers deadpan some dad jokes while the camera pans around to giggling teammates.


  • How Families Lived In Their WWII Backyard Bomb Bunkers
    In 1938, with the outbreak of World War II on the horizon, Sir John Anderson was placed in charge of air-raid preparations in Britain. He commissioned engineers to design a cheap and simple shelter which could be distributed to the population. The result: the Anderson Shelter.




  • Interested In Learning Design?
    Oh, you are? Well that’s convenient because here’s access to more than 200 hours of expert instruction on design, computer animation and game development.




  • A Full Revolution
    In the run-up to the Olympics, Simone Biles is transforming gymnastics.








  • The People Who Store Their Emotions In Their Fingertips
    In some rare cases, the link between touch and emotion can take some strange and extreme turns. Imagine being so disgusted by denim, for example, that running a hand over jeans makes you want to puke. Or feeling the urge to laugh whenever you touch silk.





  • Billionaire Technologist Accuses NASA Asteroid Mission of Bad Statistics
    Taco Cowboy quotes a report from Science Magazine: Nathan Myhrvold, ex-CTO of Microsoft, is accusing NASA of providing bad statistics on asteroid size. Mr. Myhrvold alleged that scientists using a prominent NASA space telescope have made fundamental mistakes in their assessment of the size of more than 157,000 asteroids they have observed. In a paper posted to the arXiv.org e-print repository on 22 May, Myhrvold takes aim at the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a space telescope launched in 2009, and a follow-on mission, NEOWISE, which together are responsible for the discovery of more asteroids than any other observatory. Yet Myhrvold says that the WISE and NEOWISE teams' papers are riddled with statistical missteps. "None of their results can be replicated," he tells ScienceInsider. "I found one irregularity after another" Myhrvold says the NASA teams have made mistakes, such as ignoring the margin of error introduced when extrapolating from a small sample size to an entire population. They also neglected to include Kirchhoff's law of thermal radiation in their thermal models of the asteroids. Based on his own models, Myhrvold says that errors in the asteroid diameters based on WISE data should be 30%. In some cases, the size errors rise to as large as 300%. "Asteroids are more variable than we thought they were," he says. He has submitted the paper to the journal Icarus for review. However, the WISE and NEOWISE teams are standing by their results, and say that Myhrvold's criticism should be dismissed. "For every mistake I found in his paper, if I got a bounty, I would be rich," says Ned Wright, the principal investigator for WISE at the University of California, Los Angeles. Wright says that WISE's data match very well with two other infrared telescopes, AKARI and IRAS. To find out how accurately those infrared data determine the size of an asteroid, scientists have to calibrate them with radar observations, other observations made when asteroids pass in front of distant stars, and observations made by spacecraft up close. When they do that, Wright says, WISE's size errors end up at roughly 15%. Wright says his team doesn't have Myhrvold's computer codes, "so we don't know why he's screwing up." But Wright archly noted that Myhrvold once worked at Microsoft, so "is responsible in part for a lot of bad software."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • HPE To Spin Out Its Huge Services Business, Merge It With CSC
    itwbennett writes from a report via CIO: Hewlett-Packard Enterprise announced Tuesday that it will spin off its enterprise services business and merge it with IT services company Computer Sciences Corp. (CSC) to create a company with $26 billion in annual revenue. The services business "accounts for roughly 100,000 employees, or two-thirds of the Silicon Valley giant's workforce," according to the Wall Street Journal. In a statement, HPE CEO Meg Whitman said customers would benefit from a "stronger, more versatile services business, better able to innovate and adapt to an ever-changing technology landscape." Layoffs were not a topic of discussion in Tuesday's announcement, but HPE did say last year they would cut 33,000 jobs by 2018, in addition to the 55,000 job cuts it had already announced. The company also split into two last year, betting that the smaller parts will be nimbler and more able to reverse four years of declining sales.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • TSA Replaces Security Chief As Tension Grows At Airports
    HughPickens.com writes: Ron Nixon reports at the NYT that facing a backlash over long security lines and management problems, TSA administrator Peter V. Neffenger has shaken up his leadership team, replacing the agency's top security official Kelly Hoggan (Warning: source may be paywalled) and adding a new group of administrators at Chicago O'Hare International Airport. Beginning late that year, Hoggan received $90,000 in bonuses over a 13-month period, even though a leaked report from the Department of Homeland Security showed that auditors were able to get fake weapons and explosives past security screeners 95 percent of the time in 70 covert tests. Hoggan's bonus was paid out in $10,000 increments, an arrangement that members of Congress have said was intended to disguise the payments. During a hearing of the House Oversight Committee two weeks ago, lawmakers grilled Mr. Neffenger about the bonus, which was issued before he joined the agency in July. Last week and over the weekend, hundreds of passengers, including 450 on American Airlines alone, missed flights because of waits of two or three hours in security lines, according to local news reports. Many of the passengers had to spend the night in the terminal sleeping on cots. The TSA has sent 58 additional security officers and four more bomb-sniffing dog teams to O'Hare. Several current and former TSA employees said the moves to replace Hoggan and add the new officials in Chicago, where passengers have endured hours long waits at security checkpoints, were insufficient. "The timing of this decision is too late to make a real difference for the summer," says Andrew Rhoades, an assistant federal security director at Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport who testified his supervisor accused him of "going native" after attending a meeting at a local mosque and that TSA's alleged practice of "directed reassignments," or unwanted job transfers were intended to punish employees who speak their minds. "Neffenger is only doing this because the media and Congress are making him look bad."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Toyota Forms 'Strategic Partnership' With Uber
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Verge: Toyota and Uber are forming a "strategic partnership" which will include an investment by the Japanese automaker in the San Francisco-based ride-sharing company. Under the agreement, Uber drivers can lease their vehicles from Toyota and cover their payments through earnings generated as Uber drivers. Toyota says it will invest an undisclosed sum in Uber, which is already the most valuable technology startup in the world. A partnership between Toyota and Uber could help the ride-sharing company solve a lingering question surrounding its self-driving ambitions, namely where its going to get a fleet of cars to equip with its autonomous technology. Toyota, which is the world's largest car manufacturer, is taking self-driving technology very seriously. It recently established the Toyota Research Institute to develop AI technologies in two main areas: autonomous cars and robot helpers for around the home. Last month, Google, Ford, Volvo, Lyft and Uber joined a coalition to help spur the development of self-driving cars, ultimately to make them arrive to the market faster. Meanwhile, Apple made an investment in Uber's Chinese rival Didi.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Apple To Open Up Siri To Developers, Release An Amazon Echo Competitor
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from BGR: According to a new report from The Information, Apple is finally ready to let Siri grow up. Specifically, the publication relays that Apple will finally offer official Siri APIs to developers, thus paving the way for third-party integrations, the kind that Amazon Echo users can't seem to get enough of. Things like ordering an Uber or pizza are currently impossible, because Siri is locked down by Apple. What's more, Apple is also reportedly working on a standalone device meant to compete with the Amazon Echo and Google's recently unveiled Google Home. If that's true, it's huge news -- Apple has been lacking any kind of smart home hub until now, but a Siri-powered device would be a serious play to get Apple into our homes. Google is the latest tech giant to announce a virtual home assistant. It unveiled Google Home, a small round gadget with microphones and speakers that listen and respond to your questions and commands.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • E Ink Creates Full-Color Electronic Paper Display
    SkinnyGuy writes: The reflective display company finally figured out how to make those ultra tiny balls produce 32,000 colors in one super-low-powered display. It's a breakthrough for E Ink, display advertising and, maybe someday, e-readers and digital photo frames. The new prototype display, which can be manufactured in an array of sizes, features a 20-inch, 2500 x 1600 resolution and is equally as power-efficient as the monochromatic display. E Ink Holding's Head of Global marketing Giovanni Mancini said it can be powered with solar cells used in bus stop signage, for example. Some of the limitations center around the resolution and refresh rate. As of right now, the resolution is only 150 pixels per inch (ppi), which is about half the resolution of a typical 6-inch, monochromatic E ink display. It also takes about two seconds to fully resolve images, which is pretty slow when compared to today's e-readers. The company is currently only focused on using the new color display for commercial signage.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Pastejacking Attack Appends Malicious Terminal Commands To Your Clipboard
    An anonymous reader writes: "It has been possible for a long time for developers to use CSS to append malicious content to the clipboard without a user noticing and thus fool them into executing unwanted terminal commands," writes Softpedia. "This type of attack is known as clipboard hijacking, and in most scenarios, is useless, except when the user copies something inside their terminal." Security researcher Dylan Ayrey published a new version of this attack last week, which uses only JavaScript as the attack medium, giving the attack more versatility and making it now easier to carry out. The attack is called Pastejacking and it uses Javascript to theoretically allow attackers to add their malicious code to the entire page to run commands behind a user's back when they paste anything inside the console. "The attack can be deadly if combined with tech support or phishing emails," writes Softpedia. "Users might think they're copying innocent text into their console, but in fact, they're running the crook's exploit for them."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Elderly Use More Secure Passwords Than Millennials, Says Report
    An anonymous reader writes from a report via Quartz: A report released May 24 by Gigya surveyed 4,000 adults in the U.S. and U.K. and found that 18- to 34-year-olds are more likely to use bad passwords and report their online accounts being compromised. The majority of respondents ages 51 to 69 say they completely steer away from easily cracked passwords like "password," "1234," or birthdays, while two-thirds of those in the 18-to-34 age bracket were caught using those kind of terms. Quartz writes, "The diligence of the older group could help explain why 82% of respondents in this age range did not report having had any of their online accounts compromised in the past year. In contrast, 35% of respondents between 18 and 34 said at least one of their accounts was hacked within the last 12 months, twice the rate of those aged 51 to 69."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Microsoft Awards Grants To Deliver Affordable Internet Access
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from CNET: Microsoft said Tuesday it had awarded grants to 12 businesses as part of the company's Affordable Access Initiative, part of the software giant's effort to encourage low-cost Internet around the world. Grant recipients include businesses from Argentina, Botswana, India, Indonesia, Malawi, Nigeria, Philippines, Rwanda, Uganda, the UK and the US. In addition to financial support, each company will have access to Microsoft resources, software and services to help them develop their technology. "With more than half of the world's population lacking access to the Internet, connectivity is a global challenge that demands creative problem solving," Peggy Johnson, executive vice president of business development, said in a press release. "By using technology that's available now and partnering with local entrepreneurs who understand the needs of their communities, our hope is to create sustainable solutions that will not only have impact today but also in the years to come." Google and Facebook are also working on bringing affordable Internet access around the world. Google has plans to broadcast Internet from hot air balloons via Project Loon, while Facebook plans to beam Internet down to earth from drones.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Google France Being Raided For Unpaid Taxes
    jones_supa writes: Investigators in France have raided Google's Paris headquarters amid a probe over the company's tax payments, Reuters reports. The French Finance Ministry is investigating $1.8 billion in back taxes. According to a report in French daily Le Parisien, at least 100 investigators are part of the raid at Google's offices. A source close to the finance ministry said that the raid at Google's offices has been ongoing on Tuesday since 03:00 GMT. In February, a source at the French Finance Ministry told Reuters that the government was seeking the $1.8 billion from Google. At the time, official spokespeople for Google France and the Finance Ministry refused to comment on the situation. Google could face up to a $11.14 million fine if it is found guilty, or a fine of half of the value of the laundered amount involved. In April, the EU revealed plans to force multinationals such as Google, Amazon and Facebook to disclose exactly where and how much tax they pay across the continent. A new clause was added since the Panama Papers leak requiring the companies to report how much money they make in so-called "tax havens."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Google Now Handles At Least 2 Trillion Searches Per Year
    Danny Sullivan, reporting for Search Engine Land: How many searches per year happen on Google? After nearly four years, the company has finally released an updated figure today of "trillions" per year. How many trillions, exactly, Google wouldn't say. Consider two trillion the starting point. Google did confirm to Search Engine Land that because it said it handles "trillions" of searches per year worldwide, the figure could be safely assumed to be two trillion or above. Is it more than two trillion? Google could be doing five trillion searches per year. Or 10 trillion. Or 100 trillion. Or presumably up to 999 trillion, because if it were 1,000 trillion, you'd expect Google would announce that it does a quadrillion searches per year.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • American Scientists Working On Creating Chimeras: Half-Human, Half-Animal Embryos
    Researchers at the University of California, Davis are working on creating half-human, half-animal hybrid embryos dubbed chimeras to better understand diseases and its progression. But not everybody is thrilled about it. IBTimes reports: One of the aims of the experiment using chimeras is to create farm animals with human organs. The body parts could then be harvested and transplanted into very sick people. However, a number of bioethicists and scientists frown on the creation of interspecies embryos which they believe crosses the line. New York Medical College Professor of Cell Biology and Anatomy Stuart Newman calls the use of chimeras as entering unsettling ground which damages "our sense of humanity." They are not alone in voicing their opinion against the idea. Huffington Post adds: The project is so controversial that the National Institutes of Health has refused to fund it. The researchers are relying on private donors. Critics of these experiments say they are too risky because there is no way of knowing where the human stem cells will go. Will they just become a pancreas? Or could they become a brain? And if they become a brain, will the pigs who house them have human consciousness?
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • No, Apple Won't Become a Wireless Carrier
    Don Reisinger, reporting for Fortune: Apple won't be competing with its carrier partners anytime soon. Speaking at Startup Fest Europe in Amsterdam during an interview on Tuesday, Apple CEO Tim Cook squashed rumors that his company is planning to eventually get into the cellular market to compete with the likes of AT&T and Verizon. "Our expertise doesn't extend to the network," Cook said. "We've worked with AT&T in the U.S., O2 in the U.K., as well as T-Mobile and Orange, and we expanded as we learned more. But generally, the things Apple likes to do, are things we can do globally. We don't have the network skill. We'll do some things along the way with e-SIMs along the way, but in general, I like the things carriers do."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Beware Of Keystroke Loggers Disguised As USB Phone Chargers, FBI Warns
    An anonymous reader cites an article on Ars Technica: FBI officials are warning private industry partners to be on the lookout for highly stealthy keystroke loggers that surreptitiously sniff passwords and other input typed into wireless keyboards. The FBI's Private Industry Notification (PDF) comes more than 15 months after whitehat hacker Samy Kamkar released a KeySweeper, a proof-of-concept attack platform that covertly logged and decrypted keystrokes from many Microsoft-branded wireless keyboards and transmitted the data over cellular networks. To lower the chances that the sniffing device might be discovered by a target, Kamkar designed it to look almost identical to USB phone chargers that are nearly ubiquitous in homes and offices."If placed strategically in an office or other location where individuals might use wireless devices, a malicious cyber actor could potentially harvest personally identifiable information, intellectual property, trade secrets, passwords, or other sensitive information," FBI officials wrote in last month's advisory. "Since the data is intercepted prior to reaching the CPU, security managers may not have insight into how sensitive information is being stolen."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Too Fat For Facebook: Photo Banned For Depicting Body In 'Undesirable Manner'
    An anonymous reader shares a report on The Guardian: Facebook has apologized for banning a photo of a plus-sized model and telling the feminist group that posted the image that it depicts "body parts in an undesirable manner". Cherchez la Femme, an Australian group that hosts popular culture talkshows with "an unapologetically feminist angle", said Facebook rejected an advert featuring Tess Holliday, a plus-sized model wearing a bikini, telling the group it violated the company's "ad guidelines". After the group appealed against the rejection, Facebook's ad team initially defended the decision, writing that the photo failed to comply with the social networking site's "health and fitness policy". "Ads may not depict a state of health or body weight as being perfect or extremely undesirable," Facebook wrote. "Ads like these are not allowed since they make viewers feel bad about themselves. Instead, we recommend using an image of a relevant activity, such as running or riding a bike." In a statement on Monday, Facebook apologized for its original stance and said it had determined that the photo does comply with its guidelines.Facebook said that its team scans millions of ad images every week, and sometimes understandably misses out on a few.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • HMRC sacked too many staff before digital changes took effect
    Audit watchdog snarls at taxman for hasty cost-cutting
    HMRC was too hasty to cut staff before expected cost savings from a shift to digital materialised – something that should act as a cautionary tale for its current "digitisation" plans, the National Audit Office has warned.…





  • Hand the security cookbook to your robot butler: Time to automate
    You can even pour it all into a container...
    One of the main principles of DevOps is that we break down the silos. Rather than having two individual teams for Development and Operations with conflicting goals, there is one group, all pulling in the same direction. But DevOps is about more than two teams now. Testing should be done throughout, not just plugged in at the end, especially with automated testing in every stage of the pipeline.…


  • British cops will have 59,000 body-worn cameras by end of 2016
    And forces are considering cloudy storage options
    Police forces are rapidly adopting body worn video (BWV) cameras with as many as 59,000 expected to be in use by the end of 2016/17 – according to chair of the police BWV user group Stephen Goodier.…






  • Boffins blow up water with LASERS, to watch explosions in slow-mo
    Humanity needs to know more about how matter behaves in extreme conditions
    VIDEO Boffins at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford's PULSE institute have had fun blowing up water jets and droplets with an X-ray laser. For science, of course.…


  • Former Sun CEO Scott McNealy has data on 1/14th of humanity
    He wants it for 1/7th, plus a proper thin client to access it with and for Silicon Valley to come up with some new ideas
    Former Sun CEO Scott McNealy has data on one in 14 humans, wants to get that down to one in seven, but at heart what he really wants is the thin client that Oracle killed when it acquired Sun.…




  • Pastejack attack turns your clipboard into a threat
    CTRL-V vector turns "not evil" into "evil" without the target noticing
    Once, you could use HTML/CSS to manipulate the clipboard, but it was not a good way to do so. Now a security bod has worked out how to do it in JavaScript and reckons it's a lot more dangerous.…








  • NBN raid fallout continues, with Conroy formalising privilege claim
    Feds' warrant names the guilty printer
    The Australian Labor Party's (ALP's) senator Stephen Conroy has formalised his claim of parliamentary privilege over documents seized in last week's Australian Federal Police raid of his office and the homes of two of his staffers.…


  • SWIFT CEO promises security improvements
    Humble piece comes in five slices
    The head of the SWIFT financial network has put forward a five-part plan to improve security after its systems were the focus of several cyberattacks.…




  • Twitter expands beyond 140 characters
    Photos and @username references won't be part of sending limit
    Twitter has announced another tweak to its text-message system that will give users greater space to send messages alongside pictures.…







  • UK distributor Steljes goes titsup
    Specialist audio visual firm calls administrator as cash flow dries
    Specialist audio visual distributor Steljes Ltd has called in the administrators after liquidity dried up in what was its 29th year of commercial life.…







  • UK.gov preparing to lob up to 4 BEEELLION at commodity tech
    Mega framework contract notice out ... also calls for open source
    The government’s official procurement arm, Crown Commercial Services, has coughed the contract notice for a multi-year mega framework for commodity tech valued between 2bn and 4bn.…







  • Lost containers tell no tales. Time to worry
    Keeping a grip on Docker
    Containers are becoming the de facto way of spinning up new services and applications. Many are running on cloud servers which themselves are virtual machines running on bare metal, well... somewhere in the world.…



  • Committees: Wait! Don't strap on the Privacy Shield yet
    Two working parties, ministers galore... but data transfer law remains in limbo
    The revelations by rogue NSA sysadmin Edward Snowden in 2013 caused indignant EU politicians to open a dialogue with the US government to update the data transfer regime to safeguard personal data. The Privacy Shield is the culmination of those discussions.…


  • 90 days of Android sales almost beat 9 months' worth for all flavours of Win 10
    WinPho has 0.7% market share
    Microsoft has trumpeted the fact that 300 million devices now run Windows 10, but the scale of its failure to extend its operating system dominance into mobile can be seen in the fact that of the 349 million smartphones sold in 2016's first quarter, 293.7m ran Android. And just 2.4m ran Windows Phone.…


  • Pointless features add to browser bloat and insecurity
    83 per cent of browser features are used by under one per cent of top websites
    It might be time for the warlocks of the Web and brewers of JavaScript to revisit their ever-burgeoning developer wish-lists and sweep away the rubbish.…



  • ENISA / Europol almost argue against crypto backdoors
    Malware and keyloggers are better, we think they're saying
    While the FBI, in the person of James Comey, continues its campaign to persuade the tech sector that mathematics isn't that big a thing and therefore backdoors are feasible, The European Union Agency for Network and Information Security (ENISA) and Europol have tip-toed around the issue, issuing a joint statement that both opposes and supports breaking encryption.…


Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM