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  • Red Hat: 2016:1504-01: java-1.7.0-openjdk: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for java-1.7.0-openjdk is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact [More...]





  • Red Hat: 2016:1489-01: kernel: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for kernel is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.7 Extended Update Support. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2016:1487-01: samba4: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for samba4 is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact of Moderate. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, which [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2016:1486-01: samba: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for samba is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact of Moderate. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, which [More...]





  • Pushed Fedora Graphical upgrade via Gnome software utility
    Fedora project promised when the release Fedora 24, Graphical upgrade will be push after a month through GNOME Software which is, one of the new feature on Fedora 24. Thy day came to picture now, its time to upgrade from fedora 23 to fedora 24 through GUI via GNOME software.


  • A guide to scientific computing system administration
    When developing applications for science there are times when you need to move beyond the desktop, but a fast, single node system may also suffice. In my time as a researcher and scientific software developer I have had the opportunity to work on a vast array of different systems, from old systems churning through data to some of the largest supercomputers on the planet.read more


  • Bodhi Linux 4.0.0 Alpha released
    Bodhi Linux makers released the first alpha version of latest Bodhi Linux 4.0.0. This alpha is only available for 64-bit machines.This version is based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS and it features Moksha, a beautifully modified Enlightenment Desktop Environment.


  • 5 sysadmin horror stories
    Happy System Administration Appreciation Day!The job ain't easy. There are constantly systems to update, bugs to fix, users to please, and on and on. A sysadmin's job might even entail fixing the printer (sorry). To celebrate the hard work our sysadmins do for us, keeping our machines up and running, we've collected five horror stories that prove just how scary / difficult it can be.Do you have your own sysadmin horror story? Let us know in the comments below.read more


  • How to setup HTTP2 in cPanel/WHM Linux VPS using EasyApache3
    In today’s tutorial we’ll show you how to setup HTTP2 in cPanel/WHM Linux VPS using EasyApache3. Although this feature is still in BETA (as of writing this article), it’s been well tested by the team at VPSinEU.com and it works perfectly fine.


  • Bash Tips for Linux Sysadmins
    The Bash shell is a fundamental Linux tool and, in this era of containers and clusters and microservices, good old-fashioned Linux system administration skills are as relevant as ever. Today, we'll learn about running other command shells, Bash built-ins, configuration files, and shell expansion.



  • Facebook Open Sources 17-Camera Surround360 Rig with Ubuntu Stitching Software
    In April, Facebook announced it had built a “Surround360” 3D-360 video capture system, but that it did not plan to sell it. Instead, the social networking giant promised it would open source both the hardware and the Ubuntu Linux-based software used to stitch together images from the camera into stereoscopic 360 panoramas.


  • AMD R-Series hits the jackpot on casino gaming SBC
    Axiomtek’s “GMB135” casino gaming SBC offers quad- or dual-core AMD R-Series SoCs, up to 32GB DDR4, triple display support, 32 DIOs, and intrusion detection. The GMB135 follows Axiomtek Gaming’s GMB130 Mini-ITX board, which also targeted casino gaming applications. It similarly runs Linux 3.x or Windows 7/8.1 on an AMD R-Series SoC with AMD Radeon HD10000 […]



  • Embedded Linux Conference Europe schedule on tap
    The schedule for the Oct. 11-13 ELC Europe and OpenIoT Summit in Berlin has been posted, with co-located events on Yocto, RTL, tracing, and OpenWrt. Last year, the Embedded Linux Conference Europe (ELCE) in Dublin was co-located with the European versions of LinuxCon and CloudOpen, but this year it comes a week later. LinuxCon Europe […]


  • Install Bludit on Ubuntu 16.04
    In this article, we will explain how to install Bludit on an Ubuntu 16.04 VPS with PHP-FPM and Nginx. Bludit is an open source, fast, simple, and extensible file-based content management system (CMS) application written in PHP. Bludit stores the data in a flat file (JSON format) so you don’t need to install or configure a database.


  • Howdy, Ubuntu on Windows! Ubuntu Commands Every Windows User Should Learn
    Some Windows desktop users will certainly be new to Bash and the new shell, Ubuntu on Windows. In Part 1, I introduced the topic, and in Part 2, I showed how to get started by installing Windows. In this part of our series, I’ll describe a handful of essential commands to help get started.



  • Stunnel Security for Oracle
    Oracle has integrated modern Transport Layer Security (TLS) network encryption into its eponymous database product, and TLS usage no longer requires the Advanced Security option beginning with the 10.2 databaserelease.



  • I've been Linuxing since before you were born
    Once upon a time, there was no Linux. No, really! It did not exist. It was not like today, with Linux everywhere. There were multiple flavors of Unix, there was Apple, and there was Microsoft Windows.read more




  • How to Find the Best DevOps Tools
    Automation and orchestration are key in any infrastructure setup. DevOps professionals need tools that can help them do their jobs more accurately and efficiently, but there isn’t one key to open all doors. According to a recent report from The New Stack, for example, more than 40 percent of survey respondents said an orchestration platform was the primary way they managed containers in their organization.


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  • The Curious Rise Of Scientology In Taiwan
    Scientology around the world is in broad retreat, but to be in Taiwan you would never know that. Per capita, it’s one of the most Scientology-friendly countries on earth.





  • The Unstoppable Power Of A Debris Flow
    Debris flows, similar to landslides, sweep up huge amounts of mud, dirt, rock and other debris. They're very dangerous, and incredible to watch from afar.





  • Who Buys Legal Weed?
    Where weed is legal, store data shows that the stereotypical young, male smoker is no longer the norm.




  • 6 State Employees Criminally Charged In Flint Water Crisis
    Charged are Michigan Department of Health and Human Services workers Nancy Peeler, Corinne Miller and Robert Scott, and Michigan Department of Environmental Quality employees Liane Shekter-Smith; Adam Rosenthal and Patrick Cook, according to testimony this morning in Flint’s district court.





  • Local Transmission Of Zika By Mosquitoes Confirmed In Miami
    Zika virus is actively being transmitted by local mosquitoes in a one-square-mile area just north of Downtown Miami, Florida Gov. Rick Scott said Friday morning in confirming that four cases of Zika infection in Miami-Dade and Broward counties were acquired locally.



  • The Olympic Spirit Is Dead
    The scrutiny facing Rio epitomizes the changing perception of the Games in the 21st century, where the myth is long gone.


  • Does The Disappearance Of Sea Ice Matter?
    In the vast and chaotic climate systems that govern our atmosphere and oceans, making sense of how one change — diminished sea ice — affects places or people thousands of miles away is a task of such extraordinary complexity that it strains even the most sophisticated supercomputers.





  • The Chimneypots Of Paris Rooftops
    A trivial but iconic architectural element of Europe are the chimneypots that adorn the rooftops of houses and buildings. As these photos testify, it is impossible to look over the rooftops of the sprawling French capital without being accosted by chimneypots.



  • How An Olympic Sprinter Nearly Lost Her Medals Because Of Her Autopsy
    The world was shocked when, following her murder in a mugging gone awry, her autopsy revealed that Stella Walsh had ambiguous genitalia. For the woman once regarded as the world's greatest female athlete, questions arose as to the legitimacy of her titles, and her integrity after a lifetime of living and competing as a woman.


  • Hair Is Magical
    Even modern, scientifically literate people, who certainly know better, somehow think that hair cuttings provide a link to the spirit of the person from whom the hair was taken.



  • Sandy Hook School Opening To Public, 4 Years After Massacre
    When the public gets its first glimpse Friday of the school built to replace the one where 20 first-graders and six educators were massacred, they'll see a building designed to be attractive, environmentally friendly, conducive to learning, and above all, safe.


  • Noise Is A Drug And New York Is Full Of Addicts
    Noise can cause us distress and pain, but it can also help us think, perceive, remember, and be more creative. It turns out that it’s even necessary for our physiological and mental functioning. If it’s a drug, then it’s a performance drug. And New York is full of addicts.



  • States Of Fear: Americans' Deepest Anxieties
    When photographer Mike Belleme set out to capture a portrait of America in 2016, he found a nation teetering on a precipice of change and riddled with insecurity. But unlike the hard lines of black-and-white campaigns, fear in the heart is a nuanced spectrum.


  • The Abandoned Ruins Of Hitler's Olympic Village
    Little known to most tourists and even Germans, on the edge of Berlin lie the chilling abandoned remains of “Hitler’s Olympic village,” built for the so-called Nazi Games of 1936.


  • Trump Seeks More Foreign Guest Workers For His Companies
    The presidential candidate is seeking to bring in 78 more servers, housekeepers, and cooks for his Mar-a-Lago resort and nearby golf course. The controversial guest worker program allows employers to import foreign workers, but only when there are no Americans who want the jobs.


  • What That Election Probability Means
    As of this writing, the Upshot estimates a 68% probability for Clinton and 32% for Donald Trump. FiveThirtyEight estimates 52% and 48% for Clinton and Trump. What do those numbers mean, really?



  • Watch This Livestream Of A Corpse Flower Blooming
    Corpse flowers are big, beautiful smelly creations that only bloom once every decade or so. Over the next 24-36 hours, the flower will slowly open, emitting a foul odor that, as its namesake suggests, smells like rotting bodies.


  • The Guys Who Cracked 'Pokémon Go' Wide Open
    Dronpes and Moots7 are both tall, stubbly white guys in their late 20s — the right age to have fond memories of the first generation Pokémon games. Six months ago they embarked on creating The Silph Road, a project that has become the "Pokémon Go" player’s bible.


  • Uber Has Yet To Reduce Drunk Driving Deaths, Study Says
    Uber has tried to position itself as everyone’s favorite designated driver — like a superhero that fights drunk driving. But it looks like the ridesharing service and its competitors are not actually having much of an effect.




  • AMD Extends Polaris GPU Line-up With Mainstream Radeon RX 470 and Radeon RX 460
    Some more graphics cards news via our long time reader MojoKid: AMD is officially announcing its newest mainstream members of the Polaris graphics family today, known as the Radeon RX 470 and Radeon RX 460. AMD is touting the RX 470 as a perfect companion for 1080p resolution gaming, offering 60+ FPS performance (with anti-aliasing enabled) in popular game titles. The RX 460, on the other hand, is based on Polaris 11 architecture, which has a more budget-minded performance profile. If all you're looking for is an efficient, yet capable eSports gaming card, then AMD claims the RX 460 still has you covered. Peak compute performance for the RX 470 drops in at 4.9 TFLOPs (compared to 5.8 TFLOPs for the Radeon RX 480). The RX 460 has less than half the stream processors and less than half the compute units of the RX 470 and as a result, the peak compute performance stands at 2.2 TFLOPs. Pricing for the Radeon RX 470 and Radeon RX 460 is set at $149 and $99 MSRP, respectively.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Ask Slashdot: Best Browser Extensions -- 2016 Edition
    Reader LichtSpektren writes: Almost eleven years ago, Slashdot featured an Ask titled "Favorite Firefox Extensions?". I thought it might be worthwhile to ask the question again (Editor's note: we couldn't agree more!), but expand the query to all web browsers now that there's more choices available. Right now my main browser is Firefox, which I use with uBlock Origin, Disconnect, HTTPS Everywhere, Privacy Badger, NoScript, Self-Destructing Cookies, Decentraleyes, Privacy Settings, and Clean Links. (N.B. the first four of these are also available in Chromium-based browsers.) I use Chrome as a secondary browser, with the first four of the aforementioned extensions, plus also Clear Cache and occasionally Flashcontrol. This one has nothing to do with security or privacy, but Reedy on Chromium is a really nice tool for speed reading. What do you use?Let's get this going.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • British Spy Agency GCHQ Used URL Shortener To Honeypot Arab Spring Activists
    The British spy agency GCHQ used a custom URL shortener and Twitter sockpuppets to influence and infiltrate activists during the Iran revolution of 2009 and the Arab Spring of 2011, reports Motherboard, citing leaked documents by Edward Snowden. From the article: The GCHQ's special unit, known as the Joint Threat Research Intelligence Group or JTRIG, was first revealed in 2014, when leaked top secret documents showed it tried to infiltrate and manipulate -- using "dirty trick" tactics such as honeypots -- online communities including those of Anonymous hacktivists, among others. The group's tactics against hacktivists have been previously reported, but its influence campaign in the Middle East has never been reported before. I was able to uncover it because I was myself targeted in the past, and was aware of a key detail, a URL shortening service, that was actually redacted in Snowden documents published in 2014. A now-defunct free URL shortening service -- lurl.me -- was set up by GCHQ that enabled social media signals intelligence. Lurl.me was used on Twitter and other social media platforms for the dissemination of pro-revolution messages in the Middle East.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Facebook Offering Refunds For Kids' In-App Purchases
    Parents who found themselves with hefty bills after their kids made in-app purchases -- mainly via the now-defunct Facebook Credits -- can now request a refund from Facebook. PCMag reports: The news comes as part of a settlement for a class-action lawsuit brought against the social network in February 2012, and covers those who made any kind of purchase through their Facebook accounts between February 2008 and March 2015. Facebook maintained that it did nothing wrong, as those purchasing digital currency received what they paid for. But California's Family Code stipulates that minors can void contracts they make at any point when they're under 18 years of age. In other words, the legislation is designed to prevent other entities from preying on minors who don't otherwise understand the ramifications of their actions -- like tapping repeatedly on an in-app item to acquire it.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Movie Studios 'Take Down' Popular KAT Mirror
    Following the shut down of KickassTorrents website -- after its alleged owner was arrested, Hollywood studios are playing the game of cat and mouse with pirates to put an absolute end to KickassTorrents. An anonymous reader writes: One of the most popular KAT mirrors has had its domain name taken down following pressure from the major Hollywood studios. The Armenian .AM registry was quick to disable the KAT.am domain, after it received a stark warning from the Motion Picture Association, representing Hollywood's major studios. This notice requires you to immediately (within 24 hours) take effective measures to end and prevent further copyright infringement. All opportunities provided by the website to download, stream or otherwise obtain access to the entertainment content should be disabled permanently," MPA's email reads.As TorrentFreak reports, the takedown of kat.am domain isn't the end of the website. The publication spoke to the operator of the website, and learned that they were "making continuous" attempts to bring the website back -- utilizing the channels available. Kat.am is down already, but kickass.cd and kickass.mx mirros have since cropped up. Slashdot understands that Kickass torrent community is now back in action again, on a whole new domain.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • FBI Probes Hacking of Democratic Congressional Group
    From a Reuters report: The FBI is investigating a cyber attack against another U.S. Democratic Party group, which may be related to an earlier hack against the Democratic National Committee , four people familiar with the matter told Reuters. The previously unreported incident at the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, or DCCC, and its potential ties to Russian hackers are likely to heighten accusations, so far unproven, that Moscow is trying to meddle in the U.S. presidential election campaign to help Republican nominee Donald Trump. The Kremlin denied involvement in the DCCC cyber-attack. Hacking of the party's emails caused discord among Democrats at the party's convention in Philadelphia to nominate Hillary Clinton as its presidential candidate. The newly disclosed breach at the DCCC may have been intended to gather information about donors, rather than to steal money, the sources said on Thursday.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Ask Slashdot: How Transparent Should Companies Be When Operational Technology Failures Happen?
    New submitter supernova87a writes: Last week, Southwest Airlines had an epic crash of IT systems across their entire business when "a router failure caused the airlines' systems to crash [...] and all backups failed, causing flight delays and cancellations nationwide and costing the company probably $10 million in lost bookings alone." Huge numbers of passengers, crew, and airplanes were stranded as not only reservations systems, but scheduling, dispatch, and other critical operational systems had to be rebooted over the course of 12 hours. Passenger delays, which directly attributable to this incident, continued to trickle down all the way from Wednesday to Sunday as the airline recovered. Aside from the technical issues of what happened, what should a public-facing company's obligation be to discuss what happened in full detail? Would publicly talking about the sequence of events before and after failure help restore faith in their operations? Perhaps not aiming for Google's level of admirable disclosure (as in this 18-minute cloud computing outage where a full post-mortem was given), should companies aim to discuss more openly what happened and how they recovered from system failures?
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • The Mojave Desert: Home of the New Machine Movement
    pacopico writes: Most people think of the Mojave Desert as a wasteland located somewhere between Los Angeles and Las Vegas. For decades, though, Mojave has served as something of an engineering playground for people in the automotive and aerospace industries. Bloomberg has produced a documentary that looks at what's taking place with these engineers in 2016. There's a dude trying to make a flying car, Richard Branson with Virgin Galactic, a group called Hackrod using artificial intelligence software to make a car chassis, and the hacker George Hotz taking his self-driving car along the Las Vegas strip for the first time. One of the cooler parts of the show has a team of students from UCSD sending up a rocket with a 3D printed engine -- the first time any university team had pulled something like this off. Overall, it's a cool look at the strange desert rat tinkerers.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Study: Astronauts Who Reach Deep Space 'Far More Likely To Die From Heart Disease'
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Independent: Astronauts who venture into deep space appear to be much more likely to die from heart disease, according to a new study. In another sign that leaving planet Earth is fraught with danger and a potential blow to hopes of establishing a colony on Mars, researchers discovered deep space radiation appears to damage the body's cardiovascular system. They reported that three out of the seven dead Apollo astronauts died as a result of a cardiovascular disease, such as a heart attack or stroke. Although the numbers are small, that rate of 43 percent is four to five times higher than found among astronauts who flew in low Earth orbit or who did not actually go into space, according to a paper in the journal Scientific Reports. In an attempt to test whether the higher numbers of cardiovascular deaths were simply a statistical blip or a genuine sign of the effect of traveling into deep space, the scientists exposed mice to the same type of radiation that the astronauts would have experienced. After six months, which is the equivalent of 20 human years, the mice showed damage to arteries that is known to lead to the development of cardiovascular disease in humans.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Dark Patterns Across the Web Are Designed To Trick You
    An anonymous reader writes from a report via Ars Technica: Harry Brignell has posted a 30-minute video documenting dark patterns, deliberately confusing or deceptive user interfaces (not exclusive to the internet) that trick users into setting up recurring payments, purchasing items added to a shopping cart, or spamming all contacts through pre-checked forms on Facebook games for example. Basically, they're tactics used by online services to get users to do things they wouldn't normally do. Yael Grauer has written an in-depth report on Ars Technica about dark patterns, where he discusses Brignull's work with UX designers and business executives: "Klein [Principal at Users Known and author of UX for Lean Startups] believes many of the worst dark patterns are pushed by businesses, not by designers. 'It's often pro-business at the expense of the users, and the designers often see themselves as the defender or advocate of the user,' she explained. And although Brignull has never been explicitly asked to design dark patterns himself, he said he has been in situations where using them would be an easy solution -- like when a client or boss says they really need a large list of people who have opted in to marketing e-mails. 'The first and easiest trick to have an opt-in is to have a pre-ticked checkbox, but then you can just get rid of that entirely and hide it in the terms of conditions and say that by registering you're going to be opted in to our e-mails,' Brignull said. 'Then you have a 100-percent sign-up rate and you've exceeded your goals. I kind of understand why people do it. If you're only thinking about the numbers and you're just trying to juice the stats, then it's not surprising in the slightest.' 'There's this logical positivist mindset that the only things that have value are those things that can be measured and can empirically be shown to be true, and while that has its merits it also takes us down a pretty dark place,' said digital product designer Cennydd Bowles, who is researching ethical design. 'We start to look at ethics as pure utilitarianism, whatever benefits the most people. Yikes, it has problems.'" Brignull's website has a number of examples of deliberately confusing or deceptive user interfaces.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Apple's Rigid Negotiating Tactics Cost Us 'Skinny Bundles' For Apple TV, Says Report
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Next Web: According to a new report from The Wall Street Journal, the reason we don't have actual TV channels on the Apple TV is because the company tried to strong-arm networks -- and failed. Apple's Senior Vice President Eddy Cue is said to have taken the wrong approach. In one meeting, he reportedly told TV executives that "time is on my side." Cue is also accused of bluffing executives by claiming other networks -- specifically Disney and Fox -- were already signed up. The company also refused to show off the Apple TV interface, or "sketch it on the back of a napkin," as one media executive requested. Cue also tried to strike hard bargains, says WSJ. He reportedly asked that Disney put off the royalties Apple would have to pay for several years. Those 'skinny bundles' we heard so much about were what Apple was planning to build its TV experience around, too. In 2015, a bundle consisting of Fox, ESPN and Disney content was conceptualized (and priced at $30), but no agreements were ever signed. In an effort to create more original programming, Apple is scheduled to release its 'Planet of the Apps' TV show about app developers next year.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • UK Judge Calls For An Online Court Without Lawyers To Cut Costs
    mi writes from a report via The Times: A senior judge has called for the establishment of an online court (Warning: source may be paywalled) that does not have lawyers and can deal with claims of up to 25,000 British Pound (around $32,850). The proposal is the centerpiece of a package of reforms to the civil justice system, drawn up by Lord Justice Briggs, a Court of Appeal judge. Just how exactly will this court ensure no one is, in fact, a trained professional on the internet, where no one knows who you really are, is not explained. We discussed the idea last year. Apparently, it is still alive. The judge's report says this computer court would provide "effective access to justice without having to incur the disproportionate cost of using lawyers." The Law Gazette reported earlier in June that Briggs has mused about a three-stage process -- triage, conciliation and final judgement -- in which there might be some lawyer involvement.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • North Korea Is Blackmailing Top South Korean Online Retailer For $2.66 Million
    An anonymous reader writes from a report via Softpedia: South Korea says that North Korea is behind a data breach that occurred last May, where hackers stole details about 10 million user accounts from Interpark.com, one of the country's biggest shopping portals. The hackers later tried to extort Interpark management by requesting for 3 billion won ($2.66 million / 2.39 million euros), otherwise they were going to release the data on the internet. [The hackers wanted the money transferred to their accounts as Bitcoin.] Authorities say they tracked the source of the hack to an IP in North Korea, previously used in other attacks on South Korean infrastructure. "Besides the evidence related to the IP addresses and the techniques used in the attacks, investigators also said that the emails Interpark management received, written in the Korean language, contained words and vocabulary expressions that are only used in the North," reports Softpedia.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Microsoft To Lay Off Another 2,850 People In the Next 12 Months
    An anonymous reader writes from a report via Business Insider: Microsoft is planning to lay off 2,850 more employees in the next 12 months or so, according to Microsoft's full 10-K report it filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Part of the document reads: "In addition to the elimination of 1,850 positions that were announced in May 2016, approximately 2,850 roles globally will be reduced during the year as an extension of the earlier plan, and these actions are expected to be completed by the end of fiscal year 2017." Business Insider reports: "The first 1,850 layoffs mentioned here were mainly from Microsoft's struggling smartphone business, including 1,350 employees in Finland working at what was once Nokia world headquarters. These layoffs also included people in Microsoft's salesforce, which was recently reorganized and saw the departure of COO Kevin Turner. In total, Microsoft laid off 7,400 employees in its last fiscal year, which ended on June 30th, 2016. The new layoffs are a continuation of the same plan, and include the sales group as well as others. About 900 people affected by the new layoffs were already informed during the sales reorganization, according to a person familiar with Microsoft's plans."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Samsung Beat Apple In Smartphone Shipments, Profit Surges To 2-Year High
    An anonymous reader writes: Earlier reports speculated this to be true, but now it's official: Samsung has beat Apple in smartphone shipments to lift the company to its most profitable quarter in over two years. The Hindu reports: "Riding on the strong sales of its Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 Edge smartphones, Samsung Electronics on Thursday declared 8.14 trillion won ($7billion) year on-year operating profit -- 18 percent in the second quarter results. Touted as bad news for Apple that saw a 15 percent decline in iPhone sales in its second quarter results announced this week, Samsung saw substantial earnings improvement led by sales of its flagship products such as Galaxy S7 and S7 edge. A streamlined mid-to low-end smartphone lineup also contributed to improved profitability for the company. According to Samsung, it shipped about 90 million handsets in the April-June period with smartphones making up more than 80 per cent of the total, the Korea Herald reported. Samsung's second-quarter smartphone shipments are estimated at about 72 million units, almost doubling Apple's iPhone shipments of 40.4 million units during the same period."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.




  • Why Big Business is usually last to the party
    Please Ms CFO, can we have some new hardware?
    Big businesses tend to be exceptionally risk averse. There's a general reluctance to adopt new, bleeding-edge technology because the priority – understandably – is to be able to maintain productivity.…



  • Three owner Hutch lobs sueball at EU over failed O2 buy
    Compensation please
    The owner of mobile network Three UK, CK Hutchison, has lodged a legal challenge against the European Commission. The Telegraph, which broke the story, says a filing has been filed with the General Court (formerly the Court of the First Instance), after the European Competition Commission blocked the acquisition by Hutchison.…







  • Huawei P9 Plus: Leica-toting flagship gets a big brother
    Useless to drug dealers? Tell me more...
    Review The P9 Plus deserves to be Huawei’s real flagship of 2016, and given the price tag, it’s a belter. Like the iPhone Plus, it feels like a very different beast to its smaller sibling.…




  • Happy Sysadmin Day!
    Today, it's all about you
    To all you systems administrators out there, wherever and whomever you are: Happy Systems Administrators Day! That's right, ladies, gentlemen and emacs users, the yearly holiday of sysadmin day is upon us!…


  • Milk IN the teapot: Innovation or abomination?
    The readers must decide
    Reg towers was plunged into internal strife today, with the production desk struggling to keep the news production line humming as senior editors were forced to launch an investigation into the question that has split the editorial team down the middle: is it acceptable to add the milk to the tea pot?…


  • What's on a road to nowhere? Ingram's Q2 numbers
    Come on inside... and take a peek
    Ingram Micro outlined progress, or rather lack of it, when it reported calendar Q2 numbers last night and did little to convince financial markets - including Shanghai’s Stock Exchange - that it is a business going places fast.…


  • It's time for a discussion about malvertising
    Security, meet the requirement for an informed and educated populace
    Sysadmin Blog I don't know that I can afford to read the news anymore. As a columnist for several tech magazines I find this somewhat ironic, but my occupation makes the truth of it no less real. Technology can solve this problem for me, but politics probably won't allow it.…




  • Cyberpunks might not be crooks but they're really very rude
    El Eg – whoever they are – really upset this one
    FotW An innocuous El Reg story about Russian web miscreants provoked an entirely unexpected reaction when an offended cyberpunk took it upon himself to tell us how the headline hurt his feelings.…


  • Argos changes 150 easily guessed drop-off system passwords
    Basic security fail spotted by Reg reader let anyone divert parcel deliveries
    UK catalogue store chain Argos has changed shop passwords for its drop-off store facility after a Reg reader inadvertently discovered staff relied on weak in-store access credentials to service orders.…






  • Death of 747 now 'reasonably possible' says Boeing
    Production cut, again, to just six a year as completed planes await buyers
    Six months after slicing production of the iconic Boeing 747 to just one plane a month, the aerospace company has decided to halve the rate of production and flagged it is close to killing off the plane.…






  • Ditch your Macs, Dell tells EMC staff
    Stickers touted as solution to ban on customers seeing Cupertino's kit
    Exclusive Staff at EMC who go out into the world to meet customers have been told their Apple Macs aren't allowed to come with them.…




  • Bought a GTX 970? Congrats, Nvidia owes you thirty bucks
    GPU maker opens wallet to make class-action suit go away
    Graphics goliath Nvidia has agreed to a settlement that will see it pay $30 to American gamers who purchased its GTX 970 graphics cards and can file a valid claim.…






  • nbn™ switches on first Telstra HFC-powered broadband services
    100/40Mbps services available to 2,300 Perth homes
    nbn™, the entity building and operating Australia's national broadband network (NBN), has announced its first services delivered over the hybrid fibre-coax (HFC) cables formerly owned by Australia's dominant carrier Telstra.…



  • Who should deliver our next Reg lecture? You tell us
    You could be one of our brains in a bar
    After another cracking series of summer lectures, we’re planning our next run of talks, and we want you to help us put them together. So whether you want to take the mike, or know someone we simply must speak to, now’s your chance.…



  • HP awarded £1.95m in reseller grey market fraud case
    International Computer Purchasing bagged £1.5m in disputed discounts, judge rules
    Hewlett Packard Enterprise was this week awarded £1.95m after a UK High Court judge ruled against reseller minnow International Computer Purchasing over allegations it abused special bid pricing.…




  • Avoiding Liverpool was the aim: All aboard the world's ONLY moving aqueduct
    Barton Aqueduct – where heavy metal shifts H2O
    Geek's Guide to Britain There are several fine examples of Victorian engineering still working in Blighty. Tower Bridge in London is one of my personal favourites. I was surprised to discover that another was on my doorstep. Well, 4.34km (2.7 miles) from my doorstep to be more accurate.…



  • QLC flash is tricky stuff to make and use, so here's a primer
    Readin', writin' and a-bit-matic
    QLC flash primer Quad-level cell (QLC) flash stores 4 bits per NAND cell and is very tricky stuff to use, far trickier than TLC (3 bits/cell) which is harder to user than 2 bits/cell MLC which, you guessed it, is more difficult to use than 1bit/cell SLC. Why is QLC the hardest of all to use?…


  • Hybrid Cloud: The new IT service platform?
    App level, OS level, VM level - we break it down for you
    So. Hybrid cloud. Let's start with a quick definition, courtesy in this case of TechTarget which describes it as: “a cloud computing environment which uses a mixture of on-premises, private cloud and third-party, public cloud services with orchestration between the two platforms”. I like this particular definition as it sums it up nicely: note that by “private cloud” we mean an on-premise virtualised server and storage setup.…



Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM