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  • Red Hat: 2014:2010-01: kernel: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated kernel packages that fix one security issue are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Important security [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:2009-01: kernel: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated kernel packages that fix one security issue are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.5 Extended Update Support. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Important security [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:2008-01: kernel: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated kernel packages that fix one security issue are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Important security [More...]



  • Red Hat: 2014:1999-01: mailx: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated mailx packages that fix two security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Moderate security [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:1998-01: kernel-rt: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated kernel-rt packages that fix one security issue are now available for Red Hat Enterprise MRG 2.5. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Important security [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:1997-01: kernel: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated kernel packages that fix multiple security issues and several bugs are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Important security [More...]




  • Mandriva: 2014:253: apache-mod_wsgi
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated apache-mod_wsgi package fixes security vulnerability:It was discovered that mod_wsgi incorrectly handled errors whensetting up the working directory and group access rights. A maliciousapplication could possibly use this issue to cause a local privilege[More...]



  • Mandriva: 2014:252: nss
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated nss packages fix security vulnerabilities:In the QuickDER decoder in NSS before 3.17.3, ASN.1 DER decoding oflengths is too permissive, allowing undetected smuggling of arbitrarydata (CVE-2014-1569).[More...]


  • The Difference Between Wi-Fi Security Protocols: WPA2-AES vs WPA2-TKIP
    Setting up encryption on your wireless router is one of the most important things you can do for your network security, but your router probably offers various different options—WPA2-PSK (TKIP), WPA2-PSK (AES), and WPA2-PSK (TKIP/AES) among the alphabet soup. How-To Geek explains which one to choose for a faster, more secure home network.



  • WordPress 4.1 and distraction free writing mode
    WordPress 4.1 is out and one of its best new features is a revised “distraction free writing mode.” I seem to remember that it had something like this before, but it was not as well implemented as it is in WordPress 4.1. Now, when you push the distraction free writing mode button, everything else fades away except what you need to write your post.




  • Top 10 open source interviews in 2014
    This year on Opensource.com, we published a fantastic number of interviews with open source professionals. Our writers had the opportunity to talk to many talented leaders, engineers, community managers, and more—all of them stars in their fields, at their companies. Here are my favorite 10 interviews on Opensource.com in 2014. I highly recommend you bookmark them today!



  • 2014: The Open Source Tipping Point
    Jim Zemlin's final blog post of the year, kindly contributed by The Linux Foundation: "As we review 2014, a new story emerges: software development has fundamentally shifted toward an open source model."


  • Handling the workloads of the Future
    The history of computing can be traced by the popular buzzwords of the day. In fact, at some point we should run a contest where everyone submits their 5 all-time favorite computer industry buzzwords. There have been dumb terminals, smart terminals, client server, thin client, peer-to-peer, virtualization, containers, cloud, paas, saas, iaas…the list, and the acronyms stretch to the horizon.



  • How Linux containers can solve a problem for defense virtualization
    As the virtualization of U.S. defense agencies commences, the technology’s many attributes—and drawbacks—are becoming apparent.Virtualization has enabled users to pack more computing power in a smaller space than ever before. It has also created an abstraction layer between the operating system and hardware, which gives users choice, flexibility, vendor competition and best value for their requirements. But there is a price to be paid in the form of expensive and cumbersome equipment, software licensing and acquisition fees, and long install times and patch cycles.read more



  • The elements to a better future for software
    In this interview, I take a deep dive into the life and motivations of Kyle Simpson, an open web evangelist and the author of the book on javascript, You Don't Know JS. Find him on GitHub and see his many projects and posts on Getify.me.read more



  • How to create a jailed ssh user with Jailkit on Debian Wheezy
    How to create a jailed ssh user with Jailkit on Debian WheezyThis document describes how to install and configure Jailkit in Debian Wheezy Server.  Jailkit is a set of utilities to limit user accounts to specific files using chroot() and or specific commands. Setting up a chroot shell, a shell limited to some specific command, or a daemon inside a chroot jail is a lot easier and can be automated using these utilities.


  • How to filter, split or merge pcap files on Linux
    If you are a network admin who are involved in testing an intrusion detection system or network access control policy, you may often rely on offline analysis using collected packet dumps. When it comes to storing packet dumps, libpcap's packet dump format (pcap format) is the most widely used by many open-source packet sniffing and […]Continue reading...The post How to filter, split or merge pcap files on Linux appeared first on Xmodulo.Related FAQs:What are popular packet sniffers on Linux How to install and configure tinc VPN on Linux How to set up Samba as a Primary Domain Controller How to set up two-factor authentication for SSH login on Linux How to create a site-to-site IPsec VPN tunnel using Openswan in Linux



  • What is Ubuntu Snappy?
    If you're anything like me, you've probably heard about this new thing from Canonical called "Snappy" Ubuntu Core, but at the same time trying to understand exactly what it is may leave you cross-eyed, especially with the buzzwords such as "cloud", "containers" and "apps" floating about. Once you get a handle on it, it's obvious that Canonical's new baby isn't terribly useful for those of us who are simply users, but perhaps it provides an interesting preview of what could come to the desktop version of Ubuntu in the future.




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  • Dollar Guilt In The Land Of The Collapsing Ruble
    I’m paid in dollars, but I live in Russia, where the currency is currently collapsing; as the ruble loses value, I effectively get a raise. This week alone, at the time of this writing, my salary’s worth has increased by 20%.



  • Plotting Plot Arcs Using Data
    It's interesting to look, as I did at my last post, at the plot structure of typical episodes of a TV show as derived through topic models. But while it may help in understanding individual TV shows, the method also shows some promise on a more ambitious goal: understanding the general structural elements that most TV shows and movies draw from.


  • The FBI Is Investigating GamerGate
    The Federal Bureau of Investigation just confirmed it has an open case related to GamerGate, the online movement that gave rise to sexist attacks and even death threats to women in the gaming community.


  • The Killing-It Fields
    A lot of video games can make you laugh. But only "South Park: The Stick of Truth," says a "Tonight Show" writer, can make you funny.


  • George Clooney Explains Why Sony Stood Alone In North Korean Hack
    The most powerful people in Hollywood were so fearful to place themselves in the cross hairs of hackers that they all refused to sign a simple petition of support that Clooney circulated to the top people in film, TV, records and other areas. Here, Clooney discusses the petition and how it is just part of many frightening ramifications that we are all just coming to grips with.





  • Bots Now Outnumber Humans On The Web
    Everyone knows the story of how the world wide web made the internet accessible for everyone, but a lesser known story of the Internet’s evolution is how automated code — aka bots — came to quietly take it over.


  • How Much Your Inbox Is Worth To Cybercriminals
    The true value of your email account to crooks is not merely in its ability to pump spam or even forward malicious software and viruses to your entire contact list. Depending on what you do with your account and how long you've had it, your inbox could be worth far more than you imagine.



  • Kepler Spacecraft Finds New Planet
    A year and a half after a pointing failure threatened to derail its epochal search for worlds beyond our solar system, NASA’s Kepler spacecraft has bagged another planet, astronomers announced Thursday.



  • 'Duck Hunt' Coming To Wii U
    There are few better ways to spend the holidays than by shooting birds — so it's only natural that Nintendo is bringing its classic "Duck Hunt" to the Wii U on December 25th.


  • See Arya's Radical New Costume Design
    It’s extreme makeover, Westeros edition: "Game of Thrones" fan favorite Arya Stark is undergoing a dramatic appearance change for season five.



  • Digg Song Picks For 2014
    Okay, we certainly ain't Pitchfork, but that don't mean we don't know music. Here are Digg employees' favorite tunes of the year.



  • Uber Driver In Boston Area Is Charged With Rape
    Prosecutors in Cambridge, Mass., on Wednesday charged an Uber driver with sexually assaulting a woman seeking a ride, the latest in a series of attacks on people who use the ride-hailing service.






  • Buzz Bissinger Is Selling All His Leathers
    Bissinger, a Pulitzer-winning journalist best known for his reporting on sports culture, revealed in a 2013 GQ essay that he had a shopping addiction, one inextricably intertwined with other compulsive behaviors. Now, he's getting rid of nearly all his prized collection.




  • Spend A Few Hours In The Church Of Scientology
    Wrestling with thetans, attempting to unlock a memory bank, and a personality test seemingly aimed at people with depression. This is Scientology’s “dissemination drill” for potential new members.




  • The Troll Hunters
    A group of journalists and researchers wade into ugly corners of the Internet to expose racists, creeps and hypocrites. Have they gone too far?


  • 'Serial' Podcast's $2,500 Phone Bill And The Prison Pay Phone Racket
    More than 1.5 million prisoners were held in state and federal prisons in 2013, and Global Tel-Link provided phone service to more of them than any other business. And while the prison telecom creates the backdrop for “Serial,” it’s at the center of a very different drama of its own. Prisoners and their families have long complained about the exorbitant rates for phone service. Now, after years of inaction, the federal government is getting serious about reform.





  • Patriots Players Are Terrified Of Tom Brady
    “You’ve got to — got to — be prepared for his head-butts and high-fives, because they are coming... You’ve got to brace yourself. It doesn’t look like much coming at you but it’s intense. If he throws the ball 50 yards and you run 50 yards and score, he’s going to run all 50 yards and head-butt the hell out of you.”



  • Why Do We See Faces Everywhere?
    Take a look at the slideshow above. The photos depict, in order: tower binoculars, a tank tread, tree bark, headphones, a tray table, a toilet, eggs, and more tree bark. Yet I perceived every one of them as a face, and I bet you did, too.


  • The Stakes Of Kobani
    Burying the bodies of Kurdish fighters fallen in neighboring Syria reopens old wounds in the heartland of Turkish Kurdistan.



  • Where Has All The (Sea Trash) Plastic Gone?
    When Spanish scientist Andres Cozar Cabanas compiled the first ever global map of ocean trash last July, he inadvertently uncovered a mystery. Much of the plastic he expected to find bobbing in the oceans, given a quadrupling of plastic production in recent years, had "disappeared."


  • John Waters Is A National Treasure
    No one gets the cross-section of showbiz and fandom like him. In giving us these extraordinarily particular individuals and distinct visages — both psychological and visual — Waters gets you to know in your bones that the more we are part of a vast crowd of people who idolize someone or something


  • These Airlines Lose Your Luggage The Most Often
    The U.S. Department of Transportation keeps track of the number of mishandled bagged reports, which includes "lost, damaged, delayed or pilfered baggage." And there are plenty. In the first nine months of 2014, there were more than 1.6 million cases filed.


  • Don't Stay Classy
    Occasionally a word wends its way into the cockles of whatever the Internet has instead of a heart. “Classy,” the adjectival equivalent of a graceful, pearl-draped woman in a ball-gown, is one example. It joins the ranks of such pre-programmed Web responses as  “SMDH,” “this,” and ¯\_(ツ)_/¯.



  • Feminist Moments In The History Of Video Games
    Games that present women as fully developed humans, or that communicate feminist values through a focus on cooperation or compassion, are all too rare. Here are five that thrilled us, moved us, or just made us feel like there is a place for us in the world of video games.







  • The Year Of Outrage
    From righteous fury to faux indignation, everything we got mad about in 2014 — and how outrage has taken over our lives.


  • The Earsplitting Science Behind Sound Weapons
    An LRAD is a long-range acoustic device, a powerful portable speaker designed to scare people away with sound, and it's becoming increasingly popular among police departments. It is often described by critics as a sound cannon, offering a user “the ability to issue clear, authoritative verbal commands, followed with powerful deterrent tones.”


  • Killing 'The Interview' Could Cost Sony $100 Million
    The decision — and the hack — will be costly to Sony. We can look at comparable films to come up with an estimate of how much “The Interview” might have made in theaters had it been released under normal circumstances. The answer: $100 million, give or take.








  • FBI Confirms Open Investigation Into Gamergate
    v3rgEz writes In a terse form letter responding to a FOIA request, the FBI has confirmed it has an open investigation into Gamergate, the loose but controversial coalition of gamers calling for ethics in gaming journalism — even as some members have harassed and sent death threats to female gaming developers and critics.







  • Satellite Captures Glowing Plants From Space
    sciencehabit writes About 1% of the light that strikes plants is re-emitted as a faint, fluorescent glow—a measure of photosynthetic activity. Today, scientists released a map of this glow as measured by the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2, a NASA satellite launched in July with the goal of mapping the net amount of carbon in the atmosphere. The map reveals that tropical rainforests near the equator are actively sucking up carbon, while the Corn Belt in the eastern United States, near the end of its growing season, is also a sink. Higher resolution fluorescence mapping could one day be used to help assess crop yields and how they respond to drought and heat in a changing climate.







  • Investigation: Apple Failing To Protect Chinese Factory Workers
    mrspoonsi writes with the findings of an investigation into working conditions at a factory that makes Apple products. Poor treatment of workers in Chinese factories which make Apple products has been discovered by an undercover BBC Panorama investigation. Filming on an iPhone 6 production line showed Apple's promises to protect workers were routinely broken. It found standards on workers' hours, ID cards, dormitories, work meetings and juvenile workers were being breached at the Pegatron factories. Apple said it strongly disagreed with the programme's conclusions. Exhausted workers were filmed falling asleep on their 12-hour shifts at the Pegatron factories on the outskirts of Shanghai. One undercover reporter, working in a factory making parts for Apple computers, had to work 18 days in a row despite repeated requests for a day off. Another reporter, whose longest shift was 16 hours, said: "Every time I got back to the dormitories, I wouldn't want to move. Even if I was hungry I wouldn't want to get up to eat. I just wanted to lie down and rest. I was unable to sleep at night because of the stress."







  • Critical Git Security Vulnerability Announced
    An anonymous reader writes Github has announced a security vulnerability and has encouraged users to update their Git clients as soon as possible. The blog post reads in part: "A critical Git security vulnerability has been announced today, affecting all versions of the official Git client and all related software that interacts with Git repositories, including GitHub for Windows and GitHub for Mac. Because this is a client-side only vulnerability, github.com and GitHub Enterprise are not directly affected. The vulnerability concerns Git and Git-compatible clients that access Git repositories in a case-insensitive or case-normalizing filesystem. An attacker can craft a malicious Git tree that will cause Git to overwrite its own .git/config file when cloning or checking out a repository, leading to arbitrary command execution in the client machine. Git clients running on OS X (HFS+) or any version of Microsoft Windows (NTFS, FAT) are exploitable through this vulnerability. Linux clients are not affected if they run in a case-sensitive filesystem....Updated versions of GitHub for Windows and GitHub for Mac are available for immediate download, and both contain the security fix on the Desktop application itself and on the bundled version of the Git command-line client."







  • Marissa Mayer's Reinvention of Yahoo! Stumbles
    schnell writes The New York Times Magazine has an in-depth profile of Marissa Mayer's time at the helm of Yahoo!, detailing her bold plans to reinvent the company and spark a Jobs-ian turnaround through building great new products. But some investors are saying that her product focus (to the point of micromanaging) hasn't generated results, and that the company should give up on trying to create the next iPod, merge with AOL to cut costs and focus on the unglamorous core business that it has. Is it time for Yahoo! to "grow up" and set its sights lower?







  • Ars Reviews Skype Translator
    Esra Erimez writes Peter Bright doesn't speak a word of Spanish but with Skype Translator he was able to have a spoken conversation with a Spanish speaker as if he was in an episode of Star Trek. He spoke English. A moment later, an English language transcription would appear, along with a Spanish translation. Then a Spanish voice would read that translation.







  • Extracting Data From the Microsoft Band
    An anonymous reader writes The Microsoft Band, introduced last month, hosts a slew of amazing sensors, but like so many wearable computing devices, users are unable to access their own data. A Brown University professor decompiles the app, finds that the data is transmitted to the Microsoft "cloud", and explains how to intercept the traffic to retrieve the raw minute-by-minute data captured by the Band.







  • "Team America" Gets Post-Hack Yanking At Alamo Drafthouse, Too
    Slate reports that even old movies are enough to trigger a pretty strong knee jerk: Team America, World Police, selected as a tongue-in-cheek replacement by Dallas's Alamo Drafthouse Theater for the Sony-yanked The Interview after that film drew too much heat following the recent Sony hack, has also been pulled. The theater's tweet, as reprinted by Slate: "due to circumstances beyond our control,” their Dec. 27 Team America screening has also been canceled." If only I had a copy, I'd like to host a viewing party here in Austin for The Interview, which I want to see now more than ever. (And it would be a fitting venue.)







  • Grinch Vulnerability Could Put a Hole In Your Linux Stocking
    itwbennett writes In a blog post Tuesday, security service provider Alert Logic warned of a Linux vulnerability, named grinch after the well-known Dr. Seuss character, that could provide attackers with unfettered root access. The fundamental flaw resides in the Linux authorization system, which can inadvertently allow privilege escalation, granting a user full administrative access. Alert Logic warned that Grinch could be as severe as the Shellshock flaw that roiled the Internet in September. Update: 12/19 04:47 GMT by S : Reader deathcamaro points out that Red Hat and others say this is not a flaw at all, but expected behavior.







  • Ask Slashdot: What Can I Really Do With a Smart Watch?
    kwelch007 writes I commonly work in a clean-room (CR.) As such, I commonly need access to my smart-phone for various reasons while inside the CR...but, I commonly keep it in my front pocket INSIDE my clean-suit. Therefore, to get my phone out of my pocket, I have to leave the room, get my phone out of my pocket, and because I have a one track mind, commonly leave it sitting on a table or something in the CR, so I then have to either have someone bring it to me, or suit back up and go get it myself...a real pain. I have been looking in to getting a 'Smart Watch' (I'm preferential to Android, but I know Apple has similar smart-watches.) I would use a smart-watch as a convenient, easy to transport and access method to access basic communications (email alerts, text, weather maps, etc.) The problem I'm finding while researching these devices is, I'm not finding many apps. Sure, they can look like a nice digital watch, but I can spend $10 for that...not the several hundred or whatever to buy a smart-watch. What are some apps I can get? (don't care about platform, don't care if they're free) I just want to know what's the best out there, and what it can do? I couldn't care less about it being a watch...we have these things called clocks all over the place. I need various sorts of data access. I don't care if it has to pair with my smart-phone using Bluetooth or whatever, and it won't have to be a 100% solution...it would be more of a convenience that is worth the several hundred dollars to me. My phone will never be more than 5 feet away, it's just inconvenient to physically access it. Further, I am also a developer...what is the best platform to develop for these wearable devices on, and why? Maybe I could make my own apps? Is it worth waiting for the next generation of smart-watches?







  • Australia Moves Toward New Restrictions On Technology Export and Publication
    An anonymous reader writes Australia is starting a public consultation process for new legislation that further restricts the publication and export of technology on national security grounds. The public consultation starts now (a few days before Christmas) and it is due by Jan 30th while a lot of Australians are on holidays. I don't have the legal expertise to dissect the proposed legislation, but I'd like some more public scrutiny on it. I find particularly disturbing the phrase "The Bill includes defences that reverse the onus of proof which limit the right to be presumed innocent until proven guilty" contained in this document, also available on the consultation web site.







  • India Successfully Test Fires Its Heaviest Rocket
    vasanth (908280) writes India on Thursday moved forward in rocket technology with the successful flight testing of its heaviest next generation rocket and the crew module . The 630-tonne three-stage rocket, Geo-Synchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle Mark III, carried active solid boosters, liquid core stage and a passive cryo stage and a crew module to test its re-entry characteristics. This rocket is capable of doubling the capacity of payloads India can carry into space and it can deposit up to four tonne class of communication satellites into space. India also plans to use this rocket for ferrying Indian astronauts into space. For India, ISRO (the Indian space agency) perfecting the cryogenic engine technology is crucial as India can save precious foreign exchange by launching heavy duty communication satellites by itself.







  • Cause and Effect: How a Revolutionary New Statistical Test Can Tease Them Apart
    KentuckyFC writes Statisticians have long thought it impossible to tell cause and effect apart using observational data. The problem is to take two sets of measurements that are correlated, say X and Y, and to find out if X caused Y or Y caused X. That's straightforward with a controlled experiment in which one variable can be held constant to see how this influences the other. Take for example, a correlation between wind speed and the rotation speed of a wind turbine. Observational data gives no clue about cause and effect but an experiment that holds the wind speed constant while measuring the speed of the turbine, and vice versa, would soon give an answer. But in the last couple of years, statisticians have developed a technique that can tease apart cause and effect from the observational data alone. It is based on the idea that any set of measurements always contain noise. However, the noise in the cause variable can influence the effect but not the other way round. So the noise in the effect dataset is always more complex than the noise in the cause dataset. The new statistical test, known as the additive noise model, is designed to find this asymmetry. Now statisticians have tested the model on 88 sets of cause-and-effect data, ranging from altitude and temperature measurements at German weather stations to the correlation between rent and apartment size in student accommodation.The results suggest that the additive noise model can tease apart cause and effect correctly in up to 80 per cent of the cases (provided there are no confounding factors or selection effects). That's a useful new trick in a statistician's armoury, particularly in areas of science where controlled experiments are expensive, unethical or practically impossible.







  • Will Ripple Eclipse Bitcoin?
    First time accepted submitter groggy.android writes This year's biggest news about Bitcoin may well turn out not to be the repeat of its surge in value last year against the dollar and other state currencies but its impending eclipse by another independent but corporate-backed digital currency. Popularly known as Ripple, XRP shot up in value last year along with other cryptocurrencies that took advantage of the hype around Bitcoin. However, among the top cryptocurrencies listed in Coinmarketcap.com, a site that monitors trading across different cryptocurrency exchanges, Ripple is the only one that not only regained its value after the collapse in the price of Bitcoin but has more than doubled from its peak last year. In September it displaced Litecoin to become the second most valuable cryptocurrency. Even more surpising, a Ripple fork, Stellar, is one of the two other cryptocurrencies in the Coinmarketcap top ten that have risen sharply in value during the last few weeks. What makes Ripple different from Bitcoin? Strictly speaking, Ripple isn't the name of the digital currency but of the decentralized payment network and protocol created and maintained by the eponymous Ripple Labs. Users of the Ripple system are able to transact in both cryptocurrency and regular fiat currency like the dollar without passing through a central exchange. XRP is the name of the native unit of exchange used in the Ripple network to facilitate conversion between different currency types.







  • After 40 Years As a Double Amputee, Man Gains Two Bionic Arms
    MojoKid writes Les Baugh, a Colorado man who lost both arms in an electrical accident 40 years ago, is looking forward to being able to insert change into a soda machine and retrieving the beverage himself. But thanks to the wonders of science and technology — and Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) — he'll regain some of those functions while making history as the first bilateral shoulder-level amputee to wear and simultaneously control two Modular Prosthetic Limbs (MPLs). "It's a relatively new surgical procedure that reassigns nerves that once controlled the arm and the hand," explained Johns Hopkins Trauma Surgeon Albert Chi, M.D. "By reassigning existing nerves, we can make it possible for people who have had upper-arm amputations to control their prosthetic devices by merely thinking about the action they want to perform."







  • Did Alcatraz Escapees Survive? Computer Program Says They Might Have
    In June of 1962, three prisoners escaped the penitentary on Alcatraz, in an elaborate plot that was dramatized in a Clint Eastwood movie. A question that has long puzzled the public is whether these men ever made it to shore; the many factors that made Alcatraz a secure prison include sharks, cold water, and contrary currents. Still, some artifacts from the attempt, and perhaps the appeal of stories about survival against high odds, have led many people to believe that the men actually landed safely and faded into society. coondoggie writes This week Dutch scientists from Delft University of Technology presented findings from a computer modeling program they were working on, unrelated to the mystery, that demonstrated the escapees could have survived the journey. "In hindsight, the best time to launch a boat from Alcatraz was [11:30 am], one and a half hours later than has generally been assumed. A rubber boat leaving Alcatraz at [11:30 am] would most likely have landed just north of the Golden Gate Bridge. The model also shows that debris in that scenario would be likely to wash up at Angel Island, exactly where one of the paddles and some personal belongings were found.







  • Hackers Compromise ICANN, Access Zone File Data System
    Trailrunner7 writes with this news from ThreatPost: Unknown hackers were able to compromise vital systems belonging to ICANN, the organization that manages the global top-level domain system, and had access to the system that manages the files with data on resolving specific domain names. The attack apparently took place in November and ICANN officials discovered it earlier this month. The intrusion started with a spear phishing campaign that targeted ICANN staffers and the email credentials of several staff members were compromised. The attackers then were able to gain access to the Centralized Zone Data System, the system that allows people to manage zone files. The zone files contain quite bit of valuable information, including domain names, the name server names associated with those domains and the IP addresses for the name servers. CANN officials said they are notifying any users whose zone data might have been compromised." (Here's ICANN's public note on the compromise.)







  • Reaction To the Sony Hack Is 'Beyond the Realm of Stupid'
    rossgneumann writes North Korea may really be behind the Sony hack, but we're still acting like idiots. Peter W. Singer, one of the nations foremost experts on cybersecurity, says Sony's reaction has been abysmal. "Here, we need to distinguish between threat and capability—the ability to steal gossipy emails from a not-so-great protected computer network is not the same thing as being able to carry out physical, 9/11-style attacks in 18,000 locations simultaneously. I can't believe I'm saying this. I can't believe I have to say this."







  • To Fight Currency Mismatches, Steam Adding Region Locking to PC Games
    will_die writes Because of recent currency devaluation Steam has now added region locking for games sold in Russia and CIS. Brazil and local area and Indonesia and local area are also being locked. If you purchase a game from one of those regions you cannot gift it to somone outside of the area. So someone from Russia can gift a game to someone to Georgia [Note: This Georgia, rather than this one, that is.] but not to someone in the USA. You want to see the prices in the Russia store and compare them to the Steam Christmas Sale which should be starting in a few hours.







  • Who's To Blame For Rules That Block Tesla Sales In Most US States?
    cartechboy writes The common assumption among Tesla fans seems to be that state auto-dealer lobbyists are working with Republican legislators to enact laws banning direct sales of Tesla's electric cars to retail buyers. Is it true? The New York Times published an article with some data points that assesses the supposition. While the article mainly focuses on the conflict between Uber and the Republican party, some quotes could be easily applied to Tesla. For instance, Republican National Committee chairman Reince Preibus said, "It should be consumers, not government bureaucrats or legislators, that deicde what companies get our business." The author of the article, Josh Barro, wrote that 22 states permit direct sales of automobiles by Tesla to retail buyers, and of those the majority--14 of them-- voted for President Obama. He suggested that Democratic California, Illinois, and New York "have freer markets in auto retailing than Texas," which is presently Republican. When looking at a five-year-old article by Nate Silver that looked at political donations by car dealers, fully 88 percent of those donations went to Republican candidates, and just 12 percent to Democrats. That possibly suggests a propensity among Republican state legislators to support the interests for car dealers over those of electric-car buyers. Is the small bit of evidence enough to make a case? Good background on the current system of dealership sinecure can be found in this short 2009 Competition Advocacy Paper from the U.S. Department of Justice, which delves into the history and effects of the dealers-only system which still prevails.








  • Microsoft begins war against fake phone tech support scams
    Sick callers face fingering from Redmond's revenge
    Microsoft has launched its first US lawsuit against companies offering phoney phone support for its products and says it plans further operations in the UK and India to stamp out the scammers.…






  • Woz moves to Oz
    Apple founder moving to Tasmania, aka 'The Apple Isle'
    Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak has become a permanent resident of Australia.…






  • Banish the fear of Big Brother when you bring in BYOD
    The magic of MDM
    As I have said before, bring your own device (BYOD) can be a difficult concept to sell. After all, you are basically saying to users: “We want you to supply your own IT equipment but we want to be able to control the corporate data and applications that go on it.”…


  • New fear: ISIS killers use 'digital AK-47' malware to hunt victims
    New code built in-house targets innocents fending off deranged terrorists
    Malware has emerged from war-torn Syria targeting those protesting the rule of ISIS (ISIL, Islamic State, whatever the murderous humanity-hating fanatics are calling themselves these days.)…






  • Rivals feel power of EMC's storage software bite
    Market bounces in Q3, but somebody forgot to tell Symantec and IBM
    IDC's latest storage software (SW) tracker numbers show top dog EMC is continuing to rule the kennels, with a chunkier market share than both its nearest rivals combined.…




  • LEGS IN 2015: SpaceX Falcon's landing PUT ON HOLD
    Stuttering engine means staff can knock off early
    NASA and SpaceX have announced that the firm’s fifth ISS resupply mission - which was also the first test of its ground-breaking leggy landing on a floating platform - will be postponed until next year.…




  • Last chance for Xmas Cash'n'Carrion goodies
    Including the yuletastic Reg-branded Piston Powerbank
    Those of you who'd been mulling snaffling something from our Cash'n'Carrion merchandising emporium should be aware that today is the deadline for international orders to be delivered before Xmas, and UK customers should get in there tomorrow at the latest to receive their goodies before Santa touches down on their rooftops.…


  • The Shock of The New: The Register redesign update 2
    One week in, and our thoughts on your thoughts
    One week into our redesign and more than 800 comments so far. (Also a fair few emails, tweets and a bit of Facebook feedback). Let’s acknowledge straight away that our makeover has not received universal acclaim - although we have yet to receive a death threat.…



  • Untangling .NET Core: Open source for Windows, Mac, Linux
    More changes, but it'll be different this time, honest
    Exclusive Interview It is all change in the Microsoft .NET World, as the company takes the technology open source and cross-platform. But how will old and new fit together? El Reg speaks to Director of Program Management Jay Schmelzer.…





  • Soon EVERYONE will be doing it with a strap-on: The Reg's 20 festive wearables
    From wristbands to smart watches
    Product roundup Under the tree this Christmas, wearables beyond woolly socks, gloves and tasteless jumpers will be in abundance. Wristbands and smartwatches that track our activity now cover a diverse range of prices and functions. Most offer ‘lifelogging’, the latest buzzword used to describe monitoring everything you do from exercise to sleep.…


  • UK.gov binds mobe operators to £5bn not-spot deal
    Networks agree investment for 90 per cent Blighty voice/text coverage
    Blighty’s government has announced a new deal with the top four mobe operators in the country to improve the state of so-called mobile roaming "not-spots".…


  • Disk areal density: Not a constant, consistent platter
    I guess you learn something new every day
    Comment A disk's areal density varies according to where you look on a platter. This writer had thought it was constant cross a platter but, wouldn't you know it, it's not.…




  • Tegile to shove flash into DIMMs, it would seem
    Flash. Surely there must be something it CAN'T do?
    Tegile's marketing veep figures that "PCIe flash and NVDIMMs will make their way into shared storage devices, further driving latencies down." Cue Tegile supporting flash DIMMs in 2015, then.…


  • V. R. R. Stob's magnificent saga A Game Of Dog-and-Bones
    GUARANTEED no elves and hardly any violence. Or incest
    Stob Laud Satya Nadella stood at the leaded casement of his garret, contemplating the ominous, brooding sky to the south. The flag over the Maeiouster's Hub Complex barely stirred in the still air, so that he could not only see the sigil of his once-proud house - gules and vert oblongs accroupis sur a respectant brace, azure dexter and jaune sinister, of quatrocons, conjoined to the Mark of Registered Trade - but also make out the motto VENIT FENESTRAE (which, as everybody knows, is Old Visbasian for "Windows is coming") proudly emblazoned in the finest, most delicate Comic Sans that the T-shirt weavers of Old Redmond could fashion.…



  • Oracle, the King of Cloud? Maybe in Ellison's world
    Claims that cloud will drive Oracle's future growth ring hollow
    Analysis Oracle's executive team spent most of its second-quarter earnings conference call on Wednesday talking about its cloud business – which made sense, since that was the only part of the business that showed significant growth.…








  • Singapore startup does an Uber on tech support
    Fynd seeks geeks looking to turn downtime into cash
    Next time your friend's Aunty Gladys asks if that software the nice man from India installed on her PC is legitimate, you might just get paid for helping her out.…






Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM