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  • Red Hat: 2014:1255-01: krb5: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated krb5 packages that fix one security issue are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Moderate security [More...]








  • Red Hat: 2014:1245-01: krb5: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated krb5 packages that fix multiple security issues and two bugs are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Moderate security [More...]





  • How to install Joomla on Ubuntu 14.04
    This document describes how to install and configure Joomla on Ubuntu 14.04. Joomla is an immensely popular and award-winning open source Content Management System (CMS) that enables users to build websites and create potent online applications in an unperturbed manner.




  • Understanding and Using Systemd
    So the moral is things change, computers are inevitably getting more complex, and it all works out in the end. Or not, but absent the ability to shape events to our own liking we have to deal with it.


  • Siego Throws Flame, Office Suite Kumbaya & OS Face Off
    Wearing your fireproof underwear? KDE's Aaron Seigo - never one to shy away from saying what he thinks - lit into community managers in a Google+ post on Monday, calling the community manager role in free/open source software projects “a fraud and a farce.”



  • Workload deployment tools for OpenStack
    This is the second part in a series of three articles surveying automation projects within OpenStack, explaining what they do, how they do it, and where they stand in development readiness and field usage. Previously, in part one, I covered cloud deployment tools that enable you to install/update OpenStack cloud on bare metal. Next week, in the final article, I will cover automating "day 2 management"—tools to keep the cloud and workloads up and running.


  • Global Web Literacy Gets a Boost From Maker Party 2014
    Maker Party is Mozilla’s annual campaign to teach the culture, mechanics and citizenship of the Web through community-run events around the world. This week we celebrated the record-breaking 2,513 events in 86 countries that made up Maker Party 2014.


  • Rugged mini-PC runs Android on Vias Cortex-A9 SoC
    Via debuted a rugged fanless low-power Android mini-PC based on Via’s dual-core Cortex-A9 Elite E1000 SoC, and offering mini-PCIe, mSATA, HDMI, and GbE I/O. Via designed the “Artigo A900? mini-PC for use in Android-based interactive kiosks, home automation devices, signage, and other HMI solutions. The 125 x 125 x 30mm mini-PC can be configured to “blend locally-captured real-time video streams with cloud-delivered content to create visually-compelling interactive displays for retail, banking, museums, and other environments,” says Via Technologies. The device can integrate peripherals including sensors, cameras, ticket printers, and barcode and fingerprint scanners, adds the company.



  • Multimedia Tip: Sync Your XBMC/Kodi Watched List with trakt.tv
    While this is actually cross-platform and not necessarily Linux-specific, there's no doubt many of you out there making use of the awesomeness of XBMC (soon to be known instead as 'Kodi') Media Player would be doing so on the Penguin-powered platform. In this article we look at one of the various, but easiest, ways you can sync your XBMC/Kodi TV and Movie collections and watched status, using trakt.tv.



  • Must-have GNOME extension: gTile
    Tiling window managers have always interested me, but spending a lot of time tinkering with config files or learning how to wrangle them? Not so much. What I really want is a dead simple way to organize my windows and still use a friendly desktop. And I found it, finally: the gTile extension for GNOME.



  • How to use logrotate to manage log files in Linux
    Log files contain useful information about what is going on within the system. They are often inspected during troubleshooting processes or server performance analysis. For a busy server, log files may grow quickly into very large sizes. This becomes a problem as the server will soon run out of space. Besides, working with a single […]Continue reading...The post How to use logrotate to manage log files in Linux appeared first on Xmodulo.Related FAQs:How to analyze Squid logs with SARG log analyzer on CentOS


  • King Ellison Abdicates As Oracle CEO
    You’ve no doubt already heard that Larry Ellison stepped down this afternoon as CEO of Oracle, though he’ll be sticking around for a while in his new position as executive chairman. In other words, he’s still the boss by way of being the boss’s boss – and by dint of the fact that he remains the company’s biggest shareholder with a 25% stake in the business.


  • Verizon, enemy of Open Internet rules, says it loves the “open Internet”
    No company has gone to greater lengths than Verizon in trying to stop the government from enforcing network neutrality rules.Verizon is the company that sued to overturn the Federal Communications Commission’s Open Internet Order from 2010. Verizon won a federal appeals court ruling this year, overturning anti-discrimination and anti-blocking rules and setting off a months-long scramble by the FCC to get enforceable rules into place.


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  • The Craziest Colombian Bullfighting Story Ever
    According to the man collecting tickets, the village has put on this bullfight event annually since about 1930. In an Afro-Colombian community founded on the rejection of everything Spanish, a tiny village where two small beers from a corner store cost about $1 and the best restaurant in town is an older woman's backyard, well, an 80-year-old bullfighting tradition and enormous wooden bullring feel out of place.


  • Oculus Rift Unveils New Prototype
    While we don't have full tech specs yet, it's higher resolution, with improved optics and 360-degree tracking — meaning unlike the last developer kit, it has tracking LEDs on the rear of the unit so you can spin around in your chair (or hopefully, stand up) and not get sick while using it.


  • Bill Cosby's Huge, Complicated Post-'Cosby Show' Legacy
    Cosby's renown has become less neat in the years since the show went off the air, his squeaky-clean family image tarnished by confessions of infidelity and allegations of sexual assault. His politics have become polarizing, and his name is invoked as a shorthand for a specific strain of black conservatism.



  • Video Allegedly Shows Chinese Mafia Infiltrating iPhone 6 Lines
    Sleeping on the street, enduring abuse from police and angry Apple fanatics, humoring faux-enthusiasm from Apple store employees, and ending with back-alley hand-offs with suspicious characters — turns out waiting in line for a phone isn't as uneventful as you might think.







  • Around The World In Eight Hospital Meals
    From tasty tempura to gross gruel, hospital meals across the globe vary wildly. Highbrow institutions in China and India have long served top-notch food. U.S. hospitals are starting to follow suit.


  • World Wide Web Inventor Slams Internet Fast Lanes
    In a visit to The Washington Post, on Thursday, Berners-Lee said that system is now in danger from Internet service providers (ISPs) who stand to amass too much power over what was intentionally built as a decentralized network — one where no single actor could dictate outcomes to everyone else.


  • Why Obama’s Plan To Fight Ebola Might Actually Work
    It’s too soon to tell whether President Barack Obama’s decision to dispatch troops to West Africa to assist in the fight against Ebola — an announcement squeezed in just before his big ISIS policy offensive — is the right intervention at the right time. I believe it is, for several reasons, but there are some very real pitfalls that U.S. personnel must avoid in order for their presence to be constructive rather than inflammatory.


  • Roaming Through Woody Guthrie’s New York
    You say you want to have a close encounter with Woody Guthrie, to follow his footsteps to greatness, to lay eyes on the places where American music history was made. Then you’d better get a MetroCard, because the heart of his story lies within the confines of New York City, Woody’s home for 27 of his 55 years, along a path you can roam and ramble in about a day.



  • That Stupid Derek Jeter Ad Will Make You Cry For America
    There's nothing remarkable about this advertisement. It's an advertisement. (Even Jeter seems bored by it. "It didn't take long," he said. "I was out there for about 30 minutes.") What is remarkable, in its way, is how this advertisement was disseminated and received.


  • Hitler's Former Food Taster Reveals The Horrors Of The Wolf's Lair
    Every meal could have been her last. And when she had finished eating the bland vegetarian dishes put before her, 25-year-old Margot Wölk and her young female colleagues would burst into tears and “cry like dogs” because they were grateful still to be alive.


  • The Stunning Velocity Of The Marriage Equality Movement
    The direction and pace of court decisions about same-sex couples’ marriages rights in the past 15 months brought the issue back to the Supreme Court with unanticipated speed. All that remains is the justices’ decision whether to hear a case this term.


  • The Invasion Of Corporate News
    The lines between journalism and PR are rapidly becoming blurred as business interests bypass traditional media to get their message across.



  • The Death That Could Kill Lethal Injection
    The horrific execution of Clayton Lockett by lethal injection this spring in Oklahoma took an astonishing 43 minutes to complete. Together with other botched killings, the incident has focused attention on the inexperience and incompetence that now accompanies many executions in America.



  • Video Of White House Fence Jumper Surfaces
    A man jumped a White House fence on Friday, making it into the building before being apprehended. The intruder, Omar Gonzalez, was sent to George Washington University Hospital after complaining of chest pains. How Gonzalez got so far into the White House will surely be a hot topic for the foreseeable future.




  • Meeting My Protagonist
    When I wrote a novel about a Nigerian space program, I didn’t expect it to be so close to the truth.


  • Look What Facebook’s Video Boom Does To The Internet
    Video streams on Facebook are skyrocketing, thanks to a new system that automatically plays clips in your stream, and encourages Facebook to show you more clips. So guess what happens to bandwidth usage as all of those videos are playing?


  • Tourism After The Taliban
    One sleepy Afghanistan village is trying to convince foreigners to visit a town made internationally famous by one of the worst acts of cultural terrorism in recent history. Having enjoyed years of relative stability, Bamiyan wants to open up its cultural heritage to intrepid travelers curious to see more of the country than war.


  • Roger Goodell Must Go
    In a rambling, self-indulgent press conference the NFL commissioner shows he still doesn’t get what he did wrong.



  • This Is What It Looks Like When A Race Car's Brakes Fail
    Going into the back straight of Austin's Circuit of The Americas, driver Tim Bell lost his brakes and was forced to take evasive action — careening into the turn's runoff area and ultimately into the barrier at about 100 mph. Bell walked away unharmed, his Nissan 370z, however, wasn't so lucky.



  • Pabst Sold To Russian Company
    Pabst Brewing Company — and its signature Pabst Blue Ribbon, the ironic, iconic favorite of the young and the cool — has sold to a Russian beverage firm after a century and a half of American ownership.



  • Ig Nobel Prizes Celebrate Jesus Toast And Other Silly Science
    Even seemingly silly science can be useful — for example, it's good to know that if you're experiencing a raging nosebleed, shoving a slice of cured pork up your nose just might save your life. Or that it's normal to see the face of Jesus on a piece of toast. Those published scientific findings, and many more, won the highest honors at the 24th annual Ig Nobel Prize ceremony, conducted at Harvard's Sanders Theater on Thursday.



  • What We Learned This Week
    This week we learned how billionaires shop, what happens when you embed a war photographer in a video game, and why butts are back.







  • What It Felt Like To Get An Epidural After 32 Hours Of Labor
    When I told the nurse that I wanted an epidural, Dustin, my fiancé, asked if I was sure. We’d decided ahead of time that he’d challenge me if I brought it up. “This isn’t what we talked about,” he reminded me. “This isn’t what you wanted.” I gathered my strength to respond and told him that those ideas were from a different person.





  • Why You Can't Manufacture Like Apple
    HughPickens.com writes Medium reports that although many startups want to design something that mimics the fit and finish of an Apple product, it's a good way to go out of business. "What happened when Apple wanted to CNC machine a million MacBook bodies a year? They bought 10k CNC machines to do it. How about when they wanted to laser drill holes in MacBook Pros for the sleep light but only one company made a machine that could drill those 20 m holes in aluminum? It bought the company that made the machines and took all the inventory. And that time when they needed batteries to fit into a tiny machined housing but no manufacturer was willing to make batteries so thin? Apple made their own battery cells. From scratch." Other things that Apple often does that can cause problems for a startup include white plastic (which is the most difficult color to mold), CNC machining at scale (too expensive), Laser drilled holes (far more difficult than it may seem), molded plastic packaging (recycled cardboard is your friend), and 4-color, double-walled, matte boxes + HD foam inserts (It's not unusual for them to cost upwards of $12/unit at scale. And then they get thrown away.). "If you see a feature on an Apple device you want to copy, try to find it on another company's product. If you do, it's probably okay to design into your product. Otherwise, lower your expectations. I assure you it'll be better for your startup."







  • Star Wars Producers Want a 'DroneShield' To Prevent Leaks On Set
    Jason Koebler writes Over the last couple of weeks, people have been flying drones over Pinewood Studios, where Star Wars Episode VII is being filmed. That made waves last week, but, perhaps most interestingly, the studio ordered a "DroneShield" back in June anticipating the drone problem. According to the company, a DroneShield can provide email and SMS warnings if it detects a helicopters or drone. In any case, the folks over at DroneShield say that Pinewood Studios never actually got the product: The State Department keeps close tabs on products like these that are shipped overseas, and the company's export application still hasn't gone through.







  • NVIDIA Launches Maxwell-Based GeForce GTX 980 and GeForce GTX 970 GPUs
    MojoKid (1002251) writes NVIDIA has launched two new high-end graphics cards based on their latest Maxwell architecture. The GeForce GTX 980 and GTX 970 are based on Maxwell and replace NVIDIA's current high-end offerings, the GeForce GTX 780 Ti, GTX 780, and GTX 770. NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 980 and GTX 970 are somewhat similar as the cards share the same 4GB frame buffer and GM204 GPU, but the GTX 970's GPU is clocked a bit lower and features fewer active Streaming Multiprocessors and CUDA cores. The GeForce GTX 980's GM204 GPU has all of its functional blocks enabled. The fully-loaded GeForce GTX 980 GM204 GPU has a base clock of 1126MHz and a Boost clock of 1216MHz. The GTX 970 clocks in with a base clock of 1050MHz and Boost clock of 1178MHz. The 4GB of video memory on both cards is clocked at a blisteringly-fast 7GHz (effective GDDR5 data rate). NVIDIA was able to optimize the GM204's power efficiency, however, by tweaking virtually every part of the GPU. NVIDIA claims that Maxwell SMs (Streaming Multiprocessors) offer double the performance of GK104 and double the perf per watt as well. NVIDIA has also added support for new features, namely Dynamic Super Resolution (DSR), Multi-Frame Sampled Anti-Aliasing (MFAA), and Voxel Global Illumination (VXGI). Performance-wise, the GeForce GTX 980 is the fastest single-GPU powered graphics card ever tested. The GeForce GTX 970 isn't as dominant overall, but its performance was impressive nonetheless. The GeForce GTX 970 typically performed about on par with a GeForce GTX Titan and traded blows with the Radeon R9 290X.







  • Why the iPhone 6 Has the Same Base Memory As the iPhone 5
    Lucas123 writes When the iPhone 5 was launched two years ago, the base $199 (with wireless plan) model came with 16GB of flash memory. Fast forward to this week when the iPhone 6 was launched with the same capacity. Now consider that the cost of 16GB of NAND flash has dropped by more than 13% over the past two years. So why would Apple increase capacity on its $299 model iPhone 6 to 64GB (eliminating the 32GB model), but but keep the 16GB in the $199 model? The answer may lie in the fact that the 16GB iPhone is, and has been, by far the best selling model. IHS analyst Fang Zhang believes Apple is using that to push users to its iCloud storage service. Others believe restricting storage capacity allows Apple to afford the new features, like NFC and biometrics.







  • Proposed Law Would Limit US Search Warrants For Data Stored Abroad
    An anonymous reader writes On Thursday, a bipartisan law was introduced in the Senate that would limit US law enforcement's ability to obtain user data from US companies with servers physically located abroad. Law enforcement would still be able to gain access to those servers with a US warrant, but the warrant would be limited to data belonging to US citizens. This bill, called the LEADS Act (PDF), addresses concerns by the likes of Microsoft and other tech giants that worry about the impact law enforcement over-reach will have on their global businesses. Critics remain skeptical: "we are concerned about how the provision authorizing long-arm warrants for the accounts of US persons would be administered, and whether we could reasonably expect reciprocity from other nations on such an approach."







  • KDE's UI To Bend Toward Simplicity
    sfcrazy (1542989) writes "KDE Software is often criticized for being too complicated for an average user to use. Try setting up Kmail and you would know what I mean. The KDE developers are aware of it and now they are working on making KDE UI simpler. KDE usability team lead Thomas Pfeiffer Thomas prefers a layered feature exposure so that users can enjoy certain advanced features at a later stage after they get accustomed to the basic functionality of the application. He quotes the earlier (pre-Plasma era) vision of KDE 4 – "Anything that makes Linux interesting for technical users (shells, compilation, drivers, minute user settings) will be available; not as the default way of doing things, but at the user's discretion."







  • Boeing To Take Space Tourists On Its CST-100 Spacecraft To the ISS
    MarkWhittington (1084047) writes "According to a Thursday story in Investment Business Daily, Boeing, whose CST-100 spacecraft was one of the two winners of NASA's commercial crew competition, will reserve one seat per flight for a paying tourist. For a price comparable to what space tourists now pay for trips on the Russian Soyuz, anyone will be able to take a jaunt to the International Space Station. The move places Boeing in direct competition with the Russians, who are working through a company called Space Adventures for their tourist space jaunts."







  • Android Apps Now Unofficially Able To Run On Any Major Desktop OS
    An anonymous reader writes A developer who goes by the handle Vladikoff has tweaked Google's App Runtime for Chrome (ARC) to allow any Android app to run on any major desktop operating system, not just the handful announced last week which were also limited to Chrome OS. His tweaked version of ARC is re-packaged as ARChon. The install isn't very straightforward, and you have to be in developer mode on Chrome. But there's a support forum on reddit. The extension will work on any OS running the desktop version of Chrome 37 and up as long as the user also installs chromeos-apk, which converts raw Android app packages (APKs) to a Chrome extension. Ars Technica reports that apps run this way are buggy, fast, and crash often but expresses optimism for when Google officially "opens the floodgates on the Play Store, putting 1.3 million Android apps onto nearly every platform."







  • Data Archiving Standards Need To Be Future-Proofed
    storagedude writes Imagine in the not-too-distant future, your entire genome is on archival storage and accessed by your doctors for critical medical decisions. You'd want that data to be safe from hackers and data corruption, wouldn't you? Oh, and it would need to be error-free and accessible for about a hundred years too. The problem is, we currently don't have the data integrity, security and format migration standards to ensure that, according to Henry Newman at Enterprise Storage Forum. Newman calls for standards groups to add new features like collision-proof hash to archive interfaces and software. 'It will not be long until your genome is tracked from birth to death. I am sure we do not want to have genome objects hacked or changed via silent corruption, yet this data will need to be kept maybe a hundred or more years through a huge number of technology changes. The big problem with archiving data today is not really the media, though that too is a problem. The big problem is the software that is needed and the standards that do not yet exist to manage and control long-term data,' writes Newman.







  • Why a Chinese Company Is the Biggest IPO Ever In the US
    An anonymous reader writes The Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba has made headlines lately in US financial news. At the closing of its Initial Public Offering (IPO) on Friday, it had raised $21.8 billion on the New York Stock Exchange, larger even than Visa's ($17.9 billion), Facebook's ($16 billion), and General Motors ($15.8 billion) IPOs. Some critics do say that Alibaba's share price will plummet from its current value of $93.60 in the same way that Facebook's and Twitter's plummeted dramatically after initial offerings. Before we speculate, however, we should take note of what Alibaba is exactly. Beyond the likes of Amazon and eBay, Alibaba apparently links average consumers directly to manufacturers, which is handy for an economy ripe for change. Approximately half of Alibaba's shares "were sold to 25 investment firms", and "most of the shares went to US investors."







  • Microsoft Kills Off Its Trustworthy Computing Group
    An anonymous reader writes Microsoft's Trustworthy Computing Group is headed for the axe, and its responsibilities will be taken over either by the company's Cloud & Enterprise Division or its Legal & Corporate Affairs group. Microsoft's disbanding of the group represents a punctuation mark in the industry's decades-long conversation around trusted computing as a concept. The security center of gravity is moving away from enterprise desktops to cloud and mobile and 'things,' so it makes sense for this security leadership role to shift as well. According to a company spokesman, an unspecified number of jobs from the group will be cut. Also today, Microsoft has announced the closure of its Silicon Valley lab. Its research labs in Redmond, New York, and Cambridge (in Massachusetts) will pick up some of the closed lab's operations.







  • Google's Doubleclick Ad Servers Exposed Millions of Computers To Malware
    wabrandsma (2551008) writes with this excerpt from The Verge: Last night, researchers at Malwarebytes noticed strange behavior on sites like Last.fm, The Times of Israel and The Jerusalem Post. Ads on the sites were being unusually aggressive, setting off anti-virus warnings and raising flags in a number of Malwarebytes systems. After some digging, researcher Jerome Segura realized the problem was coming from Google's DoubleClick ad servers and the popular Zedo ad agency. Together, they were serving up malicious ads designed to spread the recently identified Zemot malware. A Google representative has confirmed the breach, saying "our team is aware of this and has taken steps to shut this down."







  • Amazon Purchases .buy TLD For $4.6 Million
    onproton writes: Amazon outbid Google at the ICANN auction this week for the top-level domain .buy , to which it now has exclusive rights, paying around $4.6 million for the privilege. Google was also reportedly outbid for the .tech domain, which went for around $6.7 million. No word yet on Amazon's plans for the new domain suffix, but it's probably safe to say amazonsucks.buy will be added to Amazon's collection of reserved anti-Amazon URLs.







  • Dropbox and Google Want To Make Open Source Security Tools Easy To Use
    An anonymous reader writes: Dropbox, Google, and the Open Technology Fund have announced a new organization focused on making open source security tools easier to use. Called Simply Secure, the initiative brings together security researchers with experts in user interaction and design to boost adoption rates for consumer-facing security solutions. The companies point out that various security options already do exist, and are technically effective. Features like two-factor authentication remain useless, however, because users don't adopt them due to inconvenience or technical difficulty.







  • SteadyServ Helps Keep the Draft Beer Flowing (Video)
    "With iKeg's Technology We Guarantee You Will Never Run Out of Beer," boasts the SteadyServ website. As you listen to interviewee Mike Flockenhaus, though, you'll realize almost immediately that SteadyServ isn't making equipment for home use, but for bars and taverns that serve draft beer. Here's another good line from their site: "With the new iKeg® system, we aim to ensure that you get your beer, in the right place, at the right time. We also want to simplify the lives of all the hard-working people in the beer industry. After all, wanting and having your beer are not the same thing." Even better, it looks like they're hiring. Wouldn't it be wonderful to help keep America from running out of draft beer? (Alternate Video Link)







  • Ask Slashdot: How To Avoid Becoming a Complacent Software Developer?
    An anonymous reader writes: Next year will be the start of my 10th year as a software developer. For the last nice years I've worked for a variety of companies, large and small, on projects of varying sizes. During my career, I have noticed that many of the older software developers are burnt out. They would rather do their 9-5, get paid, and go home. They have little, if any, passion left, and I constantly wonder how they became this way. This contradicts my way of thinking; I consider myself to have some level of passion for what I do, and I enjoy going home knowing I made some kind of difference. Needless to say, I think I am starting to see the effects of complacency. In my current job, I have a development manager who is difficult to deal with on a technical level. He possesses little technical knowledge of basic JavaEE concepts, nor has kept up on any programming in the last 10 years. There is a push from the upper echelon of the business to develop a new, more scalable system, but they don't realize that my manager is the bottleneck. Our team is constantly trying to get him to agree on software industry standards/best practices, but he doesn't get it and often times won't budge. I'm starting to feel the effects of becoming complacent. What is your advice?







  • Intel Putting 3D Scanners In Consumer Tablets Next Year, Phones To Follow
    Zothecula writes: Intel has been working on a 3D scanner small enough to fit in the bezel of even the thinnest tablets. The company aims to have the technology in tablets from 2015, with CEO Brian Krzanich telling the crowd at MakerCon in New York on Thursday that he hopes to put the technology in phones as well.







  • Canadian Regulator Threatens To Impose New Netflix Regulation
    An anonymous reader writes: Netflix appeared before the Canadian broadcast regulator today, resulting in a remarkably heated exchange, with threats of new regulation. The discussion was very hostile — the CRTC repeatedly ordered Netflix to provide subscriber information and other confidential data. As tempers frayed, the Canadian regulator expressed disappointment over the responses from a company that it said "takes hundreds of millions of dollars out of Canada." The CRTC implicitly threatened to regulate the company by taking away its ability to rely on the new media exception if it did not cooperate with its orders.







  • Putin To Discuss Plans For Disconnecting Russia From the Internet
    New submitter GlowingCat writes: Russian President Vladimir Putin and several high-ranking officials will discuss the security of the Russian segment of the Internet at the meeting of the Russian Security Council next week. According to various reports, the officials will make a number of decisions about regulating the use of the Internet in Russia. This includes the ability to cut off the Russian Internet, known as Runet, from the outside world, in case of emergency.







  • TrueCrypt Gets a New Life, New Name
    storagedude writes: Amid ongoing security concerns, the popular open source encryption program TrueCrypt may have found new life under a new name. Under the terms of the TrueCrypt license — which was a homemade open source license written by the authors themselves rather than a standard one — a forking of the code is allowed if references to TrueCrypt are removed from the code and the resulting application is not called TrueCrypt. Thus, CipherShed will be released under a standard open source license, with long-term ambitions to become a completely new product.







  • Science Has a Sexual Assault Problem
    cold fjord writes: Phys.org reports, "The life sciences have come under fire recently with a study published in PLOS ONE that investigated the level of sexual harassment and sexual assault of trainees in academic fieldwork environments. The study found 71% of women and 41% of men respondents experienced sexual harassment, while 26% of women and 6% of men reported experiencing sexual assault. The research team also found that within the hierarchy of academic field sites surveyed, the majority of incidents were perpetrated by peers and supervisors. The New York Times notes, "Most of these women encountered this abuse very early in their careers, as trainees. The travel inherent to scientific fieldwork increases vulnerability as one struggles to work within unfamiliar and unpredictable conditions."







  • The Minecraft Parent
    HughPickens.com writes: Michael Agger has an interesting article in the New Yorker about parenting in the internet era and why Minecraft is the one game parents want their kids to play. He says, "Screens are no longer simply bicycles for the mind; they are bicycles that children can ride anywhere, into the virtual schoolyard where they might encounter disturbing news photos, bullies, creeps, and worse. Setting a child free on the Internet is a failure to cordon off the world and its dangers. It's nuts. ... The comfort of games is that they are partially walled off from the larger Internet, with their own communities and leaderboards. But what unsettles parents about Internet gaming, despite fond memories of after-school Nintendo afternoons, is its interconnectivity. Minecraft is played by both boys and girls, unusually. ... At its best, the game is not unlike being in the woods with your best friends. Parents also join in." According to Agger, the significance of Minecraft is how the game shows us that lively, pleasant virtual worlds can exist alongside our own, and that they are places where we want to spend time, where we learn and socialize. "To me what Minecraft represents is more than a hit game franchise," says new Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella. "It's this open-world platform. If you think about it, it's the one game parents want their kids to play." We need to meet our kids halfway in these worlds, and try to guide them like we do in the real world, concludes Agger. "Who knows how Minecraft will change under Microsoft's ownership, but it's a historic game that has shown many of us a middle way to navigate the eternal screens debate."







  • 'Why Banana Skins Are Slippery' Wins IgNobel
    gbjbaanb writes: This year's Ig Nobel prize was won by Japanese researchers investigating why banana skins produced a frictionless surface compared to apple and orange peels. (Apparently, "The polysaccharide follicular gels that give banana skins their slippery properties are also found in the membranes where our bones meet," so its not all fun and jollity). Other prizes were awarded for noting that dogs only defecate when aligned with north-south magnetic fields, and that "night owl" people are more likely to be psychopaths than early risers. Yes, that probably includes you.







  • Native Netflix Support Is Coming To Linux
    sfcrazy writes: Native support for Netflix is coming to Linux, thanks to their move from Silverlight to HTML5, Mozilla and Google Chrome. Paul Adolph from Netflix proposed a solution to Ubuntu developers: "Netflix will play with Chrome stable in 14.02 if NSS version 3.16.2 or greater is installed. If this version is generally installed across 14.02, Netflix would be able to make a change so users would no longer have to hack their User-Agent to play." The newer version of NSS is set to go out with the next security update.







  • Scotland Votes No To Independence
    An anonymous reader sends this news from the BBC: Scotland voters decided to remain part of the United Kingdom on Friday, rejecting independence in a historic referendum. The decision prevented a rupture of a 307-year union with England, bringing a huge sigh of relief to the British political establishment. Scots voted 55.3 percent to 44.7 percent against independence in a vote that saw an unprecedented turnout. "Like millions of other people, I am delighted," Prime Minister David Cameron said in a speech outside 10 Downing Street on Friday morning. "It would have broken my heart to see our United Kingdom come to an end." Cameron promised new powers for Scotland in the wake of the vote, but also warned that millions of voices in England must also be heard, calling for a "balanced settlement" that would deliver more power to England, Wales and Northern Ireland. (Somewhat related: according to a Reuters poll, one in four Americans want their state to secede from the union.)


    Read more of this story at Slashdot.



  • Last chance to snaffle LOHAN Kickstarter goodies
    Exclusive ballocket mission merchandise - get it while you can, dear readers
    There's just one day to run on the Low Orbit Helium Assisted Navigator (LOHAN) Kickstarter tin-rattling, and as our plucky Playmonaut celebrates already hitting the £30,000 target needed to take the ballocket mission to Spaceport America, we're busy getting ready to ship our generous backers' magnificent rewards.…





  • A spin of roulette in the sporty Ford Fiesta Black
    With colours to match card suits, is it worth a gamble?
    Vulture at the Wheel A car is either a head or a heart purchase. If you look at numbers and depreciation, you buy a BMW. Emotion and passion, on the other hand, stereotypically leads to an Alfa Romeo. The new Fiesta Red and Black editions try to be both. It comes it the two colours favoured by roulette, so we took it for a spin.…


  • Almunia faces GRILLING from MEPs over FAILED Google settlement deal
    Politicos to demand tough action against ad giant's 'search dominance'
    Europe’s competition chief will face tough questions from MEPs next week over his failed attempts to reach an antitrust settlement deal with Google, which fell far short of sanctions being meted out to the ad giant.…



  • Weekend reads: Shark, Chapter and Verse and World War One retold in Ring of Steel
    Sumner's story is one for Joy Division completists
    Page File El Reg bookworm Mark Diston reviews the latest literary treats. Lauded wordsmith Will Self's new novel takes some extraordinary twists and turns. Joy Division and New Order guitarist Bernard Sumner tells his life story and Alexander Watson delivers a unique take on WWI, history, not from the victors, but as told from the centre of events.


  • Oh God the RUBBER on my SHAFT has gone wrong and is STICKING to things
    Hellp meee
    Something for the Weekend, Sir? My stiff rubbery shaft is sticky. I have tried applying water, gentle detergents and even screen wipes but the stickiness of my rubber remains. It is sticky along its full length from tip to end and even my wife, who has tried to peel off the rubber, agrees that the shaft feels unpleasant in her hands.…










  • Alien condoms. Stuck to the wall. That's entirely normal, y'know
    And 3D printed model houses, because they're awesome
    100% Design The Maker Movement was out in force at 100 Per Cent Design both inside and outside the exhibition hall, with the vintage caravan of the Maker Library Network was certainly attracting attention.…





  • You - vendor. Pin your ears back, I've got some things to tell you
    No, there is no coffee and you may not sit down. Notebooks out
    Storagebod The problem with many discussions in IT is that they rapidly descend into ones that look and feel like religious debate; whereas reality is much more complex and the good IT specialist will develop their own syncretic religion and pinch bits that work from everywhere.…








  • Getting to the BOTTOM of the great office seating debate
    Belay that toil, me hearty, and park your scurvy backside
    100% Design One of the enduring passions of the design world is where we put our arses. Every year at 100 Per Cent Design there’s always a new take on where the butt stops. Some are elaborate, others inventive and, if there are a lot of seats to be considered, then things can get quite cosy too.…


  • iPhone 6: The final straw for Android makers eaten alive by the data parasite?
    Arr, makin' spy kit fer Google, a mug's game matey
    Analysis Today's long overdue update to Apple's iPhone line - which had been moribund for years - look set to squeeze some rival manufacturers to death. New iPhones at last means that Android, Google's smartphone middleware, will soon look attractive only for budget vendors selling into fast-growing emerging markets.…









  • Stray positrons caught on ISS hint at DARK MATTER source
    Landlubber scope-gazers squint to horizons and see anti-electron count surge
    Data gathered by the International Space Station's (ISS') Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is being cautiously suggested as useful evidence for the existence of dark matter.…







  • Samsung unlocks Knox at zero bucks
    The race to zero in the mobile device management market has begun
    Samsung has dropped the cost of its mobile device management (MDM) suite Knox to $0.…





  • Reg journo battles Sydney iPHONE queue, FONDLES BIG 'UN
    Swollen queue suggests bumper Fruitchomp Friday
    First Fondle If the vast queues for the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus at the Broadway Apple Store in Sydney are a reliable augury, mighty Apple is back on top form, el Reg can report.…



Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM