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  • Red Hat: 2016:1945-01: bind97: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for bind97 is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact of Important. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2016:1944-01: bind: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for bind is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5, Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6, and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact [More...]




  • Red Hat: 2016:1943-01: kvm: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for kvm is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact of Important. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2016:1939-01: kernel: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for kernel is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.6 Extended Update Support. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact [More...]











  • Time to Kill Security Questions-or Answer Them With Lies
    The notion of using robust, random passwords has become all but mainstream-by now anyone with an inkling of security sense knows that "password1" and "1234567" aren't doing them any favors. But even as password security improves, there's something even more problematic that underlies them: security questions.



  • Is the Linux kernel a security problem?
    Security is an ongoing issue for all operating systems, including Linux. While Linux has generally had a good reputation compared to Windows when it comes to security, no operating system is perfect. A writer at Ars Technica recently examined the issue of security and the Linux kernel.


  • Unsafe at any clock speed: Linux kernel security needs a rethink
    The Linux kernel today faces an unprecedented safety crisis. Much like when Ralph Nader famously told the American public that their cars were "unsafe at any speed" back in 1965, numerous security developers told the 2016 Linux Security Summit in Toronto that the operating system needs a total rethink to keep it fit for purpose.



  • Expandable, outdoor IoT gateway runs Android on i.MX6
    VIA’s “Artigo A830” IoT gateway runs Android on an i.MX6 DualLite SoC and offers HDMI, GbE, microSD, numerous serial and USB ports, plus -20 to 60° operation. As the name suggests, the VIA Technologies Artigo A830 Streetwise IoT Platform is designed for outdoor Internet of Things gateway applications.


  • Ericsson: The Journey to a DevOps Future in SDN
    There are big transformations going on in the world today that are driving rapid changes to the business of networks, said Santiago Rodriguez, VP of Engineering and head of the product development unit SDN & Policy Control at Ericsson, in his keynote Tuesday at OpenDaylight Summit.


  • Bitcoin on Amazon! Sort of...
    I was a Bitcoin fan before it was popular. That means I had thousandsof Bitcoins. It also means I sold my thousands of Bitcoins for less than$1 each. Still, the technology fascinates me, and although cryptocurrencieshave risen and fallen, I'm still a fan.



  • Tiny, open, $18 quad-core SBC has WiFi, BT, eMMC, microSD
    FriendlyARM’s 40 x 40mm “NanoPi Neo Air” hacker SBC runs Ubuntu Core on an Allwinner H3 with 8GB eMMC, WiFi, BT, a DVP cam connector, and a microSD slot. The NanoPi Neo Air is a respin of the astonishingly affordable, $8 NanoPi Neo that shipped in July, and has the same 40 x 40mm dimensions […]


  • Use shortcuts for faster web browsing
    The web browser has become the most important software on most users’ computers. You probably use your web browser for entertainment, work, learning, and other purposes. Therefore you can make your life easier by using it efficiently. Here are some tips for keyboard shortcuts that will save you time and... Continue Reading →


  • Open Source Projects Must Work Together to Survive
    Open source software is in danger of being beaten at its own game by upstart services that are tightly integrated, less complex, and easier to use. That message was at the heart of the cautionary tale told by Stephen O’Grady in his keynote at this year’s ApacheCon North America in May.


  • Asian Penguins turn failed program into a Linux success
    Stu Keroff will be speaking at All Things Open in Raleigh this year. The Community School of Excellence (CSE) Asian Penguins are the world's first and only Linux user group based in a Hmong charter school. A failed Windows laptop program at the school was turned by the Asian Penguins into a Linux success.read more


  • Choosing the right metrics for your project
    Last month we discussed setting goals for your community metrics program. These goals serve as a constant reminder of what you want to achieve in the program and should be used as metrics themselves when deciding exactly what you are going to measure.This month we'll document a basic strategy for deciding what to measure, and give examples of specific community metrics we've used in practice. Using our knowledge of our community and the goals we previously came up with, we'll make sure the metrics we choose are relevant.read more


  • How to install and use KDEConnect on Ubuntu 16.04LTS
    In this article, we will discuss one such application - dubbed KDEConnect - that connects your Android or BlackBerry phone to your Linux computer. Suppose you are working on your computer and your phone rings. You pick it up and see that there's a spam SMS. You just ignore it. After some time, the phone rings again. You again pick it up only to see another spam SMS. And this goes on, until you choose not get distracted while you are working.



  • 10 tips for DIY IoT home automation
    We live in an exciting time. Everyday more things become Internet-connected things. They have sensors and can communicate with other things, and help us perform tasks like never before. Especially at home.read more


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  • Opening A Nazi Time Capsule
    In 1934, the capsule, a copper cylinder, was buried with a formal ceremony in the foundation of one of the buildings of a training center the Nazis were constructing to indoctrinate future leaders of the Third Reich.


  • Loans That Don’t Suck
    Are you looking to pay off your credit card debt? Pave gives you access to affordable funding to make your big ideas become realities.




  • A Newspaper Journalist’s Attempt To Correct The Record
    Michael Brick was a reporter for The New York Times during 9/11 who worked on the newspapers “Portraits in Grief” series. He regretted writing one particular portrait about a firefighter named Paul Ruback. Before Brick died of cancer earlier this year, he asked his friends to get a story published that would help him correct the record.




  • Architecture And Prisons: Why Design Matters
    When it comes to infrastructure development in developing countries, there are projects that instantly appeal — like hospitals. Or schools. And then there are those that are a much harder sell; sewers, for example, or prisons.






  • Photos From A Festival For Ugly People
    Piobbico is a tiny village located in the eastern Italian region Marche, that sits between the Apennine Mountains and the Adriatic Sea. I got there on the first Sunday of September, because that's where this year's Festival of the Ugly took place. Hundreds of people gather in this tiny village annually, in order to elect the next president of the World Association of Ugly People.


  • Scientists Watch An Immune System Fight The Flu In Real Time
    To date, biologists have typically had to study the progress of a virus through indirect means, such as studying the antibodies — actually tracking the viruses themselves has been difficult. However, researchers say they've found a way to follow the progress of a virus in real time.



  • Get To Know Musical.ly, Teens’ New Favorite Social Network
    Musical.ly, an app you’ve probably never heard of unless you are a teen, or the proud owner of a teen, just raised $100,000,000 in funding. Which means it’s time for you to learn what it is, what it does, and why it’s worth so much money.




  • My Son, The Prince Of Fashion
    I took my son to Paris Fashion Week, and all I got was a profound understanding of who he is, what he wants to do with his life, and how it feels to watch a grown man stride down a runway wearing shaggy yellow Muppet pants.


  • The Fastest County In America
    Cabarrus County, North Carolina, is definitely not a hotbed for imported European supercars, nor is it in a big damn Northeastern hurry. But it makes as good a claim as any to be the fastest county in the USA. This is the mecca of going way too fast.




  • What The Cleaner Saw
    When I took a job cleaning expensive Manhattan apartments, I had no idea what I would find out about my clients.



  • A Biohacker Is Engineering Puppies To Make Them Glow In The Dark
    David Ishee’s goal isn’t just to make glowing Frankenpuppies. The glowing puppies are just proof of concept. Eventually, he wants to sequence the genomes of all of his dogs to check for common genetic conditions among Mastiffs like hip dysplasia and thyroid problems and then figure out how to engineer them out.






  • The Controversy Behind Panama's Hats
    What North Americans refer to as the Panama Hat is actually a hat that is made in Ecuador. But the hats that are actually worn throughout the country of Panama, known as sombreros pintados, are quite different.










  • The UK's Largest Sperm Bank Is Now An App
    Sperm bank? There's an app for that. The largest sperm bank in the United Kingdom -- the London Sperm Bank -- has released an official app that aims to "modernize the process of hooking prospective parents up with the biological material they need to make it happen," according to MIT Technology Review: The app is essentially just a mobile version of the filtered search function the London Sperm Bank offers on its website. But in doing something as simple as bringing its desktop services to mobile devices, the bank is making a play to further normalize reproductive technologies. The London Sperm Bank boasts that users will receive push notifications as soon as new donors are available, which could help speed things up for hopeful parents looking for a match. The road to conception can take years for people using reproductive technologies, so expediting any part of the process would be a welcome time-saver. But the bank has over 10,000 vials of sperm, so searching, even using filters, could still be a lengthy process. To combat this, the app also offers a wish list function that lets more focused users predetermine what they're looking for in a donor, and receive a notification when their criteria are met. The way the service works on mobile has been compared to Tinder, but there's actually no swiping involved. Its wish list function means it's more akin to apps like Anthology, which job seekers use to find their next career move. The report notes that, while there are other mobile sperm bank apps out there, the London Sperm Bank is the only one with several medical associations and the U.K. government's Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority on board. Also, the app is free to download, but the cost of ordering sperm is about $1,200 per order, which is the same as if you order through the London Sperm Bank catalogue.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Commodore C64 Survives Over 25 Years Balancing Drive Shafts In Auto Repair Shop
    MojoKid writes: One common gripe in the twenty-first century is that nothing is built to last anymore. Even complex, expensive computers seem to have a relatively short shelf-life nowadays. However, one computer in a small auto repair shop in Gdansk, Poland has survived for the last twenty-five years against all odds. The computer in question here is a Commodore C64 that has been balancing driveshafts non-stop for a quarter of a century. The C64C looks like it would fit right in with a scene from Fallout 4 and has even survived a nasty flood. This Commodore 64 contains a few homemade aspects, however. The old computer uses a sinusoidal waveform generator and piezo vibration sensor in order to measure changes in pressure, acceleration, temperature, strain or force by converting them to an electrical charge. The C64C interprets these signals to help balance the driveshafts in vehicles. The Commodore 64 (also known as the C64, C-64, C= 64) was released in January 1982 and still holds the title for being the best-selling computer of all time.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • US Believes Hackers Are Shielded By Russia To Hide Its Role In Cyberintrusions: WSJ
    According to a report from The Wall Street Journal (Warining: may be paywalled), U.S. officials are all but certain that the hacker Guccifer 2.0, who hacked the Democratic National Committee in June, is connected to a network of individuals and groups who are being shielded by the Russian government to mask its involvement in cyberintrusions. Even though the hacker denies working for the Russian government, the hacker is thought to be working with the hacking groups Fancy Bear and Cozy Bear, which have ties to the Russian government. The Wall Street Journal reports: Following successful breaches, the stolen data are apparently transferred to three different websites for publication, these people say. The websites -- WikiLeaks, DCLeaks.com and a blog run by Guccifer 2.0 -- have posted batches of stolen data at least 42 times from April to last week. Cybersecurity experts believe that DCLeaks.com and Guccifer 2.0 often work together and have direct ties to Russian hackers. Guccifer 2.0 said in a Twitter direct message sent to The Wall Street Journal that he wants to expose corruption in politics and shine light on how companies influence policy. The hacker said he also hopes to expose "global electronization." "I think I won't have a better opportunity to promote my ideas than this year," Guccifer 2.0 added in a long exchange with a Journal reporter. The Journal cannot verify the identity of the person sending messages on behalf of Guccifer 2.0, but the account is the same one that was used to publish personal information about Democrats. A posting on a blog run by Guccifer 2.0 says he is a man who was born in Eastern Europe, has been a hacker for years and fears for his safety. "I think u've never felt that feeling when u r crazy eager to shout: look everyone, this is me, this is me who'd done it," the hacker wrote to the Journal. "but u can't." WikiLeaks officials didn't respond to requests for comment on whether Russia fed them the stolen files published by WikiLeaks in July. A representative for DCLeaks.com asked the Journal to submit questions via email but hasn't responded to them. Last week, U.S. intelligence chielf James Clapper said it "shouldn't come as a big shock to people" that Russia is behind the hacking operation. While Russia has tried to interfere in U.S. elections since at least the 1960s by spying and funneling money to particular political groups, "I think it's more dramatic maybe because now they have the cyber tools," he said.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • 92% of the World's Population Exposed To Unsafe Levels of Air Pollution: WHO
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from Science Daily: A new World Health Organization (WHO) air quality model confirms that 92% of the world's population lives in places where air quality levels exceed WHO limits. "The new WHO model shows countries where the air pollution danger spots are, and provides a baseline for monitoring progress in combatting it," says Dr Flavia Bustreo, Assistant Director General at WHO. It also represents the most detailed outdoor (or ambient) air pollution-related health data, by country, ever reported by WHO. The model is based on data derived from satellite measurements, air transport models and ground station monitors for more than 3000 locations, both rural and urban. It was developed by WHO in collaboration with the University of Bath, United Kingdom. Some 3 million deaths a year are linked to exposure to outdoor air pollution. Indoor air pollution can be just as deadly. In 2012, an estimated 6.5 million deaths (11.6% of all global deaths) were associated with indoor and outdoor air pollution together. Nearly 90% of air-pollution-related deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries, with nearly 2 out of 3 occurring in WHO's South-East Asia and Western Pacific regions. Ninety-four per cent are due to noncommunicable diseases -- notably cardiovascular diseases, stroke, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. Air pollution also increases the risks for acute respiratory infections. Major sources of air pollution include inefficient modes of transport, household fuel and waste burning, coal-fired power plants, and industrial activities. However, not all air pollution originates from human activity. For example, air quality can also be influenced by dust storms, particularly in regions close to deserts. The model has carefully calibrated data from satellite and ground stations to maximize reliability. National air pollution exposures were analyzed against population and air pollution levels at a grid resolution of about 10 km x 10 km. The interactive maps provide information on population-weighted exposure to particulate matter of an aerodynamic diameter of less than 2.5 micrometers (PM2.5) for all countries. The map also indicates data on monitoring stations for PM10 and PM2.5 values for about 3000 cities and towns. Quartz's report features a table that highlights the countries with the world's worst air pollution. The table "shows all the median levels of particulate matter in each country where the WHO collected data."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Facebook, Amazon, Google, IBM, and Microsoft Come Together To Create Historic Partnership On AI
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: In an act of self-governance, Facebook, Amazon, Alphabet, IBM, and Microsoft came together today to announce the launch the new Partnership on AI. The group is tasked with conducting research and promoting best practices. Practically, this means that the group of tech companies will come together frequently to discuss advancements in artificial intelligence. The group also opens up a formal structure for communication across company lines. It's important to remember that on a day to day basis, these teams are in constant competition with each other to develop the best products and services powered by machine intelligence. Financial support will be coming from the initial tech companies who are members of the group, but in the future membership and involvement is expected to increase. User activists, non-profits, ethicists, and other stakeholders will be joining the discussion in the coming weeks. The organizational structure has been designed to allow non-corporate groups to have equal leadership side-by-side with large tech companies. As of today's launch, companies like Apple, Twitter, Intel and Baidu are missing from the group. Though Apple is said to be enthusiastic about the project, their absence is still notable because the company has fallen behind in artificial intelligence when compared to its rivals -- many of whom are part of this new group. The new organization really seems to be about promoting change by example. Rather than preach to the tech world, it wants to use a standard open license to publish research on topics including ethics, inclusivity, and privacy.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Spotify in Talks To Acquire SoundCloud
    Janko Roettgers, writing for Variety: Spotify is in advanced talks to acquire rival music service SoundCloud, according to a report by the Financial Times. An announcement of the acquisition could be made soon, according to the Times. The acquisition would come just months after SoundCloud launched its own paid streaming service. A Spotify spokesperson declined to comment on the report when contacted by Variety; SoundCloud didn't immediately respond to a request for comment. Spotify is the market leader in the growing paid streaming business, disclosing earlier this month that it now has more than 40 million paying subscribers. Its biggest competitor is Apple Music with 17 million paying subscribers.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Banks Adopting Blockchain 'Dramatically Faster' Than Expected
    Banks and other financial institutions are adopting blockchain technology "dramatically faster" than initially expected, with 15 percent of top global banks intending to roll out full-scale, commercial blockchain products in 2017, IBM said on Wednesday. Reuters reports: The technology company said 65 percent of banks expected to have blockchain projects in production in three years' time, with larger banks -- those with more than 100,000 employees -- leading the charge. IBM, whose findings were based on a survey of 200 banks, said the areas most commonly identified by lenders as ripe for blockchain-based innovation were clearing and settlement, wholesale payments, equity and debt issuance and reference data. Blockchain, which originates from digital currency bitcoin, works as an electronic transaction-processing and record-keeping system that allows all parties to track information through a secure network, with no need for third-party verification.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Amazon Looking To Abandon UPS, FedEx In Favor of Its Own Delivery Service
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: A report by The Wall Street Journal claims that Amazon is building its own shipping service to replace FedEx and UPS, giving it more control over its packages and possibly allowing it to ship packages from other retailers. Amazon has said its own delivery services would be meant to increase its capacity during busier times of the year, like the upcoming holiday season. However, "current and former Amazon managers and business partners" claim that the company's plans are bigger than that. The initiative dubbed "Consume the City" will eventually let Amazon "haul and deliver" its own packages and those of other retailers and consumers. That delivery network would also directly compete with the likes of UPS and FedEx. It makes sense that Amazon would want to sell, ship, and deliver orders on its own. The report estimates that the company spent $11.5 billion on shipping just last year, amounting to 10.8 percent of sales. The shipping process is currently a bit convoluted: packages from Amazon warehouses get sent to one of two shipping routes, either FedEx or UPS, or to a sorting facility that lumps all packages with similar zip codes together. FedEx and UPS handle its shipments and deliver them to customers, while the packages at the sorting facilities either get delivered via USPS or by Amazon employees themselves. If Amazon were to have control over its shipments over longer distances, it's estimated that the company could save about $3 per package -- about $1.1 billion annually.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • D-Wave's 2,000-Qubit Quantum Annealing Computer Now 1,000x Faster Than Previous Generation
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from Tom's Hardware: D-Wave, a Canadian company developing the first commercial "quantum computer," announced its next-generation quantum annealing computer with 2,000 qubits, which is twice as many as its previous generation had. One highly exciting aspect of quantum computers of all types is that beyond the seemingly Moore's Law-like increase in number of qubits every two years, their performance increases much more than just 2x, unlike with regular microprocessors. This is because qubits can hold a value of 0, 1, or a superposition of the two, making quantum systems able to deal with much more complex information. If D-Wave's 2,000-qubit computer is now 1,000 faster than the previous 1,000-qubit generation (D-Wave 2X), that would mean that, for the things Google tested last year, it should now be 100 billion times faster than a single-core CPU. The new generation also comes with control features, which allows users to modify how D-Wave's quantum system works to better optimize their solutions. These control features include the following capabilities: The ability to tune the rate of annealing of individual qubits to enhance application performance; The ability to sample the state of the quantum computer during the quantum annealing process to power hybrid quantum-classical machine learning algorithms that were not previously possible; The ability to combine quantum processing with classical processing to improve the quality of both optimization and sampling results returned from the system. D-Wave's CEO, Vern Brownell, also said that D-Wave's quantum computers could also be used for machine learning task in ways that wouldn't be possible on classical computers. The company is also training the first generation of programmers to develop applications for D-Wave quantum systems. Last year, Google said that D-Wave's 1,000 qubit computer proved to be 100 million times faster than a classical computer with a single core: "We found that for problem instances involving nearly 1,000 binary variables, quantum annealing significantly outperforms its classical counterpart, simulated annealing. It is more than 10^8 times faster than simulated annealing running on a single core," said Hartmut Neven, Google's Director of Engineering.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Verizon Technician Is Accused of Selling Customers' Call Records and Location Data To Private Investigator
    A former Verizon technician who worked in Alabama is being accused of selling customers' private call records and location data to an unnamed private investigator. Authorities said the data was sold for more than four years, from 2009 to 2014. The Associated Press reports: [Daniel Eugene Traeger] logged into one Verizon computer system to gain access to customers' call records, authorities said. He used another company system known as Real Time Tool to "ping" cellphones on Verizon's network to get locations of the devices, according to the plea agreement. He then compiled the data in spreadsheets, which he sent to the private investigator for years, the court records show. "Between April 2009 and January 2014, the defendant was paid more than $10,000 in exchange for his provision of confidential customer information and cellular location data to the PL, an unauthorized third party," court records state. Though Traeger was based in the Birmingham area, the court records do not indicate whether the information that was sold involved Verizon Wireless customers in Alabama or elsewhere. He faces up to five years in prison, but prosecutors are recommending a lesser sentence since he accepted responsibility, according to terms of the plea agreement.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • HP To Issue 'Optional Firmware Update' Allowing 3rd-Party Ink
    Soon after the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) issued a letter to HP, calling for them to apologize to customers for releasing firmware that prevents the use of non-HP ink cartridges and refilled HP cartridges, the company has responded with a temporary solution. HP "will issue an optional firmware update that will remove the dynamic security feature" for certain OfficeJet printers. Ars Technica reports: HP made its announcement in a blog post titled "Dedicated to the best printing experience." "We updated a cartridge authentication procedure in select models of HP office inkjet printers to ensure the best consumer experience and protect them from counterfeit and third-party ink cartridges that do not contain an original HP security chip and that infringe on our IP," the company said. The recent firmware update for HP OfficeJet Pro, and OfficeJet Pro X printers "included a dynamic security feature that prevented some untested third-party cartridges that use cloned security chips from working, even if they had previously functioned," HP said. For customers who don't wish to be protected from the ability to buy less expensive ink cartridges, HP said it "will issue an optional firmware update that will remove the dynamic security feature. We expect the update to be ready within two weeks and will provide details here." This customer-friendly move may just be a one-time thing. HP said it will continue to use security features that "protect our IP including authentication methods that may prevent some third-party supplies from working." Without the optional firmware update, printers will only be able to use third-party ink cartridges that have an "original HP security chip," the company said.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Cloudflare: We Can't Shut Down Pirate Sites
    CloudFlare has said it cannot shut down piracy websites. The CloudFlare's response comes two months after adult entertainment outfit ALS Scan filed a complaint at a California federal court two months ago in which the company accused the CDN service of various counts of copyright and trademark infringement. From a TorrentFreak report:"CloudFlare is not the operator of the allegedly infringing sites but is merely one of the many intermediaries across the internet that provide automated CDN services, which result in the websites in question loading a bit faster than they would if they did not utilize CDN services." If Cloudflare terminated the accounts of allegedly infringing websites, the sites themselves would still continue to exist. It would just require a simple DNS reconfiguration to continue their operation. "Indeed, there are no measures of any kind that CloudFlare could take to prevent this alleged infringement, because the termination of CloudFlare's CDN services would have no impact on the existence and ability of these allegedly infringing websites to continue to operate," Cloudflare writes. As such, the company argues that it's not "materially contributing" to any of the alleged copyright infringements.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • The United Nations Will Launch Its First Space Mission In 2021
    The United Nations will send its first ever mission to space in 2021. It said it intends to send Sierra Nevada's Dream Chaser spacecraft into a two-week, low-Earth orbit flight in 2021. Sierra Nevada had signed the UN as a partner in June. Motherboard adds:As detailed for a small crowd at the International Astronautical Congress yesterday, the goal of the 2021 UN mission is to make space accessible to developing member states that lack the resources to develop a standalone, national space program. "One of UNOOSA's core responsibilities is to promote cooperation and the peaceful uses of outer space, but our work is about more than that," said Simonetta Di Pippo, the director of UNOOSA. "We have the vision of bringing the benefits of space to humankind, and that means helping developing countries access space technologies and their benefits."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • US Warns Samsung Washing Machine Owners After Explosion Reports
    Samsung may have a new problem on its hands, and it feels too familiar. The U.S. regulators on Wednesday warned users of certain top-loading Samsung washing machines of safety issues following reports that "some have exploded." CNN reports: The warning, from the Consumer Product Safety Commission, covered machines made between March 2011 and April 2016. It did not specify a model. The commission suggested people use only the delicate cycle to wash bedding and water-resistant and bulky items because the lower spin speed "lessens the risk of impact injuries or property damage due to the washing machine becoming dislodged." The agency said it is working with Samsung on a remedy.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • No Man's Sky Under Investigation For False Advertising
    No Man's Sky is one of the most talked about games this year. The game sees the protagonist explore the space and experience uncertain places. But its controversial promotional material may also have played an instrumental role in making the title a sleeper-hit success. Polygon reports: No Man's Sky's promotional material has come under fire since launch, and it's now the subject of an ongoing investigation. The U.K.-based Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) confirmed to Polygon that it's received "several complaints about No Man's Sky's advertising," which angry customers have criticized as misleading. "I can confirm we have received several complaints about No Man's Sky advertising and we have launched an investigation," the ASA told Polygon. A representative for the ASA declined to comment on the particulars of the investigation, but a thread on the No Man Sky's subreddit details some of the most prominent issues Steam users have with the game's store page, which they passed on to the organization. Screens and video on Steam suggest a different type of combat, unique buildings, "ship flying behaviour" and creature sizes than what's found in the actual game itself. The store page overall has also been criticized for showing No Man's Sky with higher quality graphics than can be attained in-game.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.




  • Ever seen a storage startup and thought: 'Pshaw. I could do that?'
    Funding, contacts, brainboxes... a step-by-step guide
    Part One You read The Register about people getting ahead with the most ridiculous startup ideas and ask: "Why that can't be you?" How is the game played? Well, let's design a storage startup from scratch and find out.…


  • Sendspace shrugs at phishers exploiting free service
    To: Whomever, From: Whomever, Attached: Whatever
    File delivery site Sendspace has said it isn't worried about a huge email spoofing issue with its free service – because legitimate businesses don't use it.…



  • But is it safe? Uncork a bottle of vintage open-source FUD
    FOSS's hidden marathon to big-ticket respectability
    “Yeah, but is open source a safe choice?” Surprisingly, I’ve been asked that frequently of late. Larger organisations in particular are giving me the old squinty eye. The folks in these conference rooms and tentacular email threads are often looking to replace decades old stacks of IT and get their “digital transformation” on, so perhaps they can be forgiven asking such a dated question.…








  • What a time to be alive: Nissan reveals self-driving chair
    Tired of standing in queues? Auto-maker says it's solved serious societal problem
    POLL Nissan has revealed a thing called the “ProPILOT Chair” that it says exemplifies “the benefits of its intelligent mobility technology” because it “ automatically queues on behalf of its occupant, sparing them the hassle of standing in line.”…


  • Researchers crack Oz Govt medical data in 'easy' attack with PCs
    White hat efforts show up Govt's proposed laws to criminalise research
    Australian researchers have laid waste to the Federal Government's plan to criminalise the decryption of anonymised state data sets, just a day after it was announced, by 'easily' cracking government-held medical data.…







  • Google deleted some cloudy middleware accounts
    They're back and the 15-hour SNAFU is mostly over, but this is no way to run a cloud
    Google's Cloud has experienced a fifteen-hour hiccup, after some subscriptions to its “Cloud Pub/Sub … were deleted unexpectedly approximately from Tuesday.”…


  • Source: nbn™'s fibre-to-the-kerb will be VDSL at 100/40Mbps
    But Optus still gets its $800m payday, even though its network was too expensive to upgrade
    The Register has learned that the fibre-to-the-distribution-point (FTTdp) technology to be used in Australia's national broadband network (NBN) will use VDSL and be capable of 100/40Mbps speeds.…




  • South Australian mega-storm blacks out whole state
    Weather, 1: electricity infrastructure hackers, 0. And let's not even start on the 'wind farms broke the world' theory
    An “unprecedented” storm in South Australia blacked out the entire state yesterday, and the Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) is warning another low pressure system will cross the state today.…








  • Analyst: iPhone 7 points to price jump
    It is all in the numbers
    Apple may have dampened down expectations when it released the last set of quarterly financial figures, and predicted revenues down again year-on-year for the current quarter, but at least one analyst disagrees.…






  • DARPA does a podcast
    2006 called, it wants its technology back
    US military lunacy department DARPA has begun offering a podcast.…


  • Fresh-faced startup promises bigger, faster non-volatile DIMMs
    Server shake-up through 4TB, 2u latency NVDIMM tech
    Early-stage startup Xitore says it is developing bigger and faster non-volatile flash DIMMs to give servers a performance boost so they could run more VMs and containers and run them faster by sidestepping high latency storage IOS.…



  • Natwest online payments go down
    I got BILLS I gotta pay...
    Customers at Blighty's high-street bank Natwest have been struggling to make online payments this afternoon.…


  • Apple moving to scrubbed up London's Battersea Power Station
    Tim Cook moves in opposite dog’s home? Pigs will fly...
    Apple is moving into a shiny new HQ at the revamped Battersea Power Station in London – just as soon as developers have finished wrecking rebuilding the iconic Southside brick masterpiece.…


  • These five weird tricks will help you manage your hybrid cloud
    Oh yes, and keep the auditors happy
    When you get to a certain age, and you've been in the IT industry for enough years, you start to get an idea of what auditors are looking for when they descend on you and ask you pointed questions about your systems.…


  • Revealed: The true horror of being a big CEO
    Pity the poor reporter who had to shadow Mark Hurd
    Our attention has been drawn to the work of a plucky reporter Julie Bort from Business Insider, who spent a day shadowing Oracle CEO at its OpenWorld jamboree in San Francisco. Finally – a chance to see the real glamour behind the scenes with a top flight chief exec.…


  • ‘Inflexion point’ BlackBerry washes hands of hardware biz
    Switches to licensing 'secure Android' and apps
    Here’s your chance to design your own BlackBerry. BlackBerry today ended its 17-year adventure as a phone-maker with CEO John Chen announcing “a new strategic direction focussed on licensing our secure device software and the BlackBerry brand.”…


  • How do you approach continuous security?
    In application development, build it in
    Promo Earlier this week we ran a live broadcast looking at how to build security into your application development process. You can watch it here.…


  • BT tops Ofcom's broadband whinge list
    Virgin and Sky rated least moaned about
    BT has topped a UK watchdog's quarterly whinge list for the most moaned about fixed line broadband provider in Blighty.…


  • Raspberry Pi adds PIXEL eye candy to desktop
    Raspbian gets user interface makeover and Chromium browser
    Fruity low-cost computer the Raspberry Pi is constantly getting enhancements, and the latest is an update to its Raspbian Linux build, which has been given a makeover with a new desktop shell called PIXEL and a version of the Chromium browser.…




  • Our Windows windows will be resizable, soooon, vows Microsoft
    Back to the '80s
    Ignite Microsoft this week promised to increase desktop users’ productivity by bringing resizeable overlapping windows to Windows™ – a feature notably missing today. A spokesman also expressed hope that Mr Gorbachev’s new policy of “perestroika” would continue, bringing real benefits to Soviet citizens.…



Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM