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  • Mandriva: 2014:202: php
    LinuxSecurity.com: A vulnerability has been discovered and corrected in php:A heap corruption issue was reported in PHP's exif_thumbnail()function. A specially-crafted JPEG image could cause the PHPinterpreter to crash or, potentially, execute arbitrary code[More...]








  • Red Hat: 2014:1686-01: openstack-neutron: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated openstack-neutron packages that fix one security issue and several bugs are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 4.0. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Moderate security [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:1685-01: openstack-glance: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated openstack-glance packages that fix one security issue and several bugs are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 4.0. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Moderate security [More...]



  • Red Hat: 2014:1677-01: wireshark: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated wireshark packages that fix multiple security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Moderate security [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:1676-01: wireshark: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated wireshark packages that fix multiple security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Moderate security [More...]


  • Kubuntu 14.10 Screenshot Tour
    Kubuntu 14.10 is available for upgrade or install. It comes in two flavours, the stable Plasma 4 running the desktop we know from previous releases, and a tech preview of the next generation Plasma 5 for early adopters. Plasma 4 is our recommended stable offering and what you get from the default download, but is now in maintenance mode.





  • How to install Puppet master and client in Ubuntu 14.04
    This document describes how to install and configure Puppet on Ubuntu 14.04 server, I will also connect a puppet client with Ubuntu 14.04 desktop. Puppet is a configuration management system that allows you to define the state of your IT infrastructure, then automatically enforces the correct state.




  • Taiga, a new open source project management tool with focus on usability
    Whether you are a developer, project manager, or a stakeholder of any level—you’d like to have a clear view of where the project is headed. Are the deadlines being continuously achieved? How is the load on developers? How much of the project is complete? What is next for you in the project? And so on.


  • Ubuntu Turns 10 & systemd Is Not Contagious
    Everyone is either at Seattle GNU/Linux Conference, Ohio LinuxFest or All Things Open, so there’s no one around to bounce off some ideas regarding what’s happening this week. Besides, if you were at any of those three events –- and if not, why not? — you probably know more than I do at this point.


  • MozFest 2014 begins today
    Today marks the beginning of the fifth annual Mozilla Festival, one of the world’s biggest celebrations of the open web. More than 1,600 participants from countries around the globe will gather at Ravensbourne in East London for a weekend of collaborating, building prototypes, designing innovative web literacy curricula and discussing how the ethos of the open web can contribute to the fields of science, journalism, advocacy and more.


  • Rise of Linux – a hacker’s history
    The original code of Linux was written for fun, or in Eric Raymond’s phrase, to ‘scratch the itch’ of Linus Torvalds, and later to satisfy the enthusiasm and programming itch of an assortment of hackers and hobbyists who, for the most part, had grown up in the age of the ZX80 and the BBC Micro, Acorns and Apricots, for which the code was often available – and hackable.



  • Charting new licensing territories with the Open Definition standard
    Open Knowledge and the Open Definition Advisory Council have announced the release of version 2.0 of the Open Definition. The Definition “sets out principles that define openness in relation to data and content,” and is the baseline from which various public licenses are measured. Any content released under an Open Definition-conformant license means that anyone can “freely access, use, modify, and share that content, for any purpose, subject, at most, to requirements that preserve provenance and openness.”




  • Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn : Video and Screenshot Tours
    Ubuntu 14.10 Utopic Unicorn is the latest version of ubuntu operating system developed by Canonical. It now available to download and install on PC and Laptop. On this release ubuntu 14.10 have been updates to many core packages, including a new 3.16-based kernel, Unity Desktop 7.3.1, and new AppArmor with fine-grained socket control, and many more.


  • Ubuntu 14.10 Charms the Linux Unicorn
    n the Utopic Unicorn, Juju now has the ability to "charm" Hadoop big data deployments, making it easier for server administrators to deploy big data processing and analytics.Juju isn't just for deploying Linux-only workloads anymore either: The orchestration system can now deploy Microsoft Windows Server-based workloads, Baker said. "A key part of our strategy is to enable administrators to use Ubuntu tools to manage multiple workloads, irrespective of the operating system,"


  • Ubuntu 14.10 Screenshot Tour
    Ubuntu 14.10, the latest desktop release is today available for download from Canonical. This release focuses on the developer experience, overall quality, and brings a number of important features and security enhancements. The Ubuntu desktop continues to be intuitive, easy to use and reliable for users all over the world. Ubuntu is a popular choice for developers targeting the cloud, mobile or devices because it is easy to use, fast and secure. Ubuntu 14.10 introduces the first iteration of the Ubuntu Developer Tools Centre, which makes it even easier to develop on Ubuntu. It downloads all the Android toolkits and their dependencies and integrates them with the launcher in a single command. This is first available for Android and will soon extend to other platforms such as Go and Dart.


  • Lollipop unwrapped: Chromium WebView will update via Google Play
    Android 5.0, codenamed Lollipop, has introduced a key change to the WebView component, used by app developers to display HTML 5 content within their apps, making new features more readily available. WebView — based on the open source Chromium project (Chrome without the proprietary bits) — will now be updateable via Google's Play store, according to a recent official post.


  • Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) Review
    Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn), the latest operating system released by Canonical, is here right on time, six months after the previous version. We now take a closer look at the new OS and we'll try to see what has been changed and how it compares with previous iterations.


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  • The King Of Swindlers
    The French confidence man who took credit for what one nineteenth-century paper called “the most gigantic swindle of our time."



  • Nation’s First Non-Profit Supermarket Is Picking Up Steam
    About one year ago, food justice advocates tuned in to a promising remedy for food deserts in the city of Chester, Pennsylvania. Could Fare & Square — the nation’s first non-profit full-scale supermarket — be a sustainable model in a 34,000-resident city where there hadn’t been a supermarket of any kind in 12 years?


  • The Secret History And Uncertain Future Of Comics Character John Constantine
    There's never been a comics character like John Constantine, DC Comics' trench-coat-sporting magician and wisecracking righter of wrongs. Astoundingly, he's remained largely unchanged since he first took to the page in 1985 and throughout 26 years of constant publication — a kind of character consistency that's unheard of even among icons like Superman or Batman.



  • An Interview With A Captured ISIS Fighter
    The power was off in the Western countryside of Aleppo, as is usually the case since the start of the revolution. "Do you have any ISIS prisoners right now?" I asked. The Sheikh nodded. "Can I interview one?" The Sheikh nodded again.


  • MLB, Homeland Security And The Great Undercover Underwear Sting
    On Tuesday, undercover agents from the Department of Homeland Security entered a tiny boutique lingerie store in Kansas City called Birdies. The shop was selling cotton panties that bore the phrase "Take the Crown" and an artistic rendering of the Royals logo designed by one of its co-owners, Peregrine Honig.


  • An American Drug Dealer In China
    In China’s capital, drugs are surprisingly easy to obtain, often sold in alleys surrounding Sanlitun, a popular bar area, just blocks away from a police station. Beijing officials have been trying to tackle the city’s growing drug problem for years, often targeting foreign dealers and users.







  • Decades-Old Scientific Paper May Hold Clues To Dark Matter
    Here’s one reason libraries hang on to old science journals: A paper from an experiment conducted 32 years ago may shed light on the nature ofdark matter, the mysterious stuff whose gravity appears to keep the galaxies from flying apart.




  • 1,000-Pound Firework Sets World Record
    At a festival in Konosu City, Japan, attendees watched a rocket weighing 1,014 pounds and measuring nearly four feet in circumference explode into the night sky. This whole fireworks display is impressive, but if you're looking for the big bang, it comes at around 3:15.


  • A Record Falls
    A well-known computer scientist parachuted from a balloon near the top of the stratosphere on Friday, falling faster than the speed of sound and breaking the world altitude record set just two years ago.


  • Sam Biddle Is Leaving Valleywag
    Sam Biddle, editor of Gawker's technology site, Valleywag, is leaving the publication and moving to a different department within Gawker Media.


  • The Great Kansas Tea Party Disaster
    Extremist Republicans turned their government into a lab experiment of tax cuts and privatization. And now they may be losing control of one of the reddest states in the nation.











  • WHO Says Ebola Vaccine Plans Accelerating
    Trials of Ebola vaccines could begin in West Africa in December, a month earlier than expected, and hundreds of thousands of doses should be available for use by the middle of next year, the World Health Organization said on Friday.


  • Searching For The Fountain Of Youth
    Ponce’s actual Fountain of Youth, it turns out, is probably the legend of the Fountain of Youth itself — the Spaniard and his insatiable thirst for eternity — which has outlived him now, in spite of most historians’ objections, by almost 500 years.





  • What It’s Like To Go Bowling With Someone Who Has Ebola
    I’m under no illusion that I may  have gotten the disease that is currently scaring the shit out of everyone from a mere high five. I know that it requires direct contact with bodily fluids from someone who outwardly appears very sick. Nor do I think that I can get Ebola from a bowling ball. Nor do I have any idea if I did, in fact, high five Spencer.  But, well, why the hell do I feel like this?



  • How To Save Your Smartphone's Battery Life
    This interactive guide shows you how to make the most of your phone's ​battery life. Just choose the make and model of your phone from the drop-down menu and learn how to stay juiced.






  • When Will The World End?
    Will it be nuclear war? A giant meteor? Colonization and eventual destruction by an alien race? Forget about the "how" for right now, and focus on the "when."


  • A Brief History Of The Straw
    Q: What do you get when you combine a pencil, a mint julep, and a man dissatisfied with the status quo? A: The modern-day drinking straw. Besides being a joke that will never take off, that’s an accurate description of the birth of straws as we know them today. Since then, straws have been downright radicalized.


  • What We Learned This Week
    This week, we learned the best time to buy an airplane ticket, the best place to grab a beer in Antarctica, and the best glass to pour that beer into.


  • Texas Health Workers Use Tabasco To Help Train For Ebola
    As Texas health workers prepare two new biocontainment units to help treat any future Ebola patients the state might have, they're are using one piece of training equipment from a neighboring state that may surprise you: Tabasco sauce.


  • The Fed Is Telling Wall Street Banks To Clean Up Their Ethics Or Get Broken Up
    Speeches from Federal Reserve Bank presidents tend not to be very interesting, and indeed New York Fed President William Dudley's recent talk on "Enhancing Financial Stability by Improving Culture in the Financial Services Industry" seems to have been titled so as to maximize the number of people who ignore it. But he ended with a bombshell, telling CEOs that unless they clean up their acts, the Wall Street megabanks are going to get broken up.


  • Twitter 'Source Of All Evil' Says Saudi Cleric
    Sheikh Abdul Aziz al-Sheikh, the grand mufti of Saudi Arabia, made the comments on his Fatwa television show earlier this week. "If it were used correctly, it could be of real benefit, but unfortunately it's exploited for trivial matters," he said about the social networking site.


  • The Day UFOs Stopped A Soccer Match
    Sixty years ago a soccer match ground to a halt when unidentified flying objects were spotted above a stadium in Florence. Did aliens come to earth? If not, what were they?




  • What The New York City Ebola Patient Was Doing Before He Was Hospitalized
    Officials said Dr. Spencer visited locations in Manhattan and Brooklyn before he became sick. He took the A and L trains on Wednesday to the Gutter in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, where he bowled with friends. He took an Uber taxi back to Manhattan. He also went to the High Line and may have stopped at a restaurant along the way. He rode the 1 train and went on a three-mile jog.


  • The Wacky Geopolitics Of 'Civilization: Beyond Earth'
    Though you won't find this story explicitly told in the game itself, it's based on a reading of modern geopolitics that extrapolates decades and even centuries into the future. How plausible is this lore? Well, since there's nothing more fun than analyzing a fictional universe as though it's real life, I thought I'd take a closer look using our modern-day understanding of history, political science and technology.


  • How The Griz Coat Became A Millennial Phenomenon
    “Excuse me, but what’s in that box?” a sixty-something man asks Karl Reichstetter, 33. A cardboard cube rests at Reichstetter’s feet in Philz Coffee, in the Castro neighborhood of San Francisco. Two furry, triangular ears poke up out of the box’s open top. “It’s a bear coat that you can wear for fun,” Reichstetter explains as the man starts backing away.






  • OwnCloud Dev Requests Removal From Ubuntu Repos Over Security Holes
    operator_error notes a report that ownCloud developer Lukas Reschke has emailed the Ubuntu Devel mailing list to request that ownCloud (server) be removed from the Ubuntu repositories because it contains "multiple critical security bugs for which no fixes have been backported," through which an attacker could "gain complete control [of] the web server process." From the article: However, packages can't be removed from the Ubuntu repositories for an Ubuntu version that was already released, that's why the package was removed from Ubuntu 14.10 (2 days before its release) but it's still available in the Ubuntu 14.04 and 12.04 repositories (ownCloud 6.0.1 for Ubuntu 14.04 and ownCloud 5.0.4 for Ubuntu 12.04, while the latest ownCloud version is 7.0.2). Furthermore, the ownCloud package is in the universe repository and software in this repository "WILL NOT receive any review or updates from the Ubuntu security team" (you should see this if you take a look at your /etc/apt/sources.list file) so it's up to someone from the Ubuntu community to step up and fix it. "If nobody does that, then it unfortunately stays the way it is", says Marc Deslauriers, Security Tech Lead at Canonical. You can follow the discussion @ Ubuntu Devel mailing list. So, until (if) someone fixes this, if you're using ownCloud from the Ubuntu repositories, you should either remove it or upgrade to the latest ownCloud from its official repository, hosted by the openSUSE Build Service."







  • Microsoft Now Makes Money From Surface Line, Q1 Sales Reach Almost $1 Billion
    SmartAboutThings writes Microsoft has recently published its Q1 fiscal 2015 earnings report, disclosing that it has made $4.5 billion in net income on $23.20 billion in revenue. According to the report, revenue has increased by $4.67 billion, compared to $18.53 billion from the same period last year. However, net income has decreased 14 percent compared to last year's $5.24 billion mainly because of the $1.14 billion cost associated with the integration and restructuring expenses related to the Nokia acquisition. But what's finally good news for the company is that the Surface gross margin was positive this quarter, which means the company finally starts making money on Surface sales. Microsoft didn't yet reveal Surface sales, but we know that Surface revenue was $908 million this quarter, up a massive 127 percent from the $400 million this time last year. However, if we assume that the average spent amount on the purchase of this year's Surface Pro 3 was around $1000, then we have less than 1 million units sold, which isn't that impressive, but it's a good start.







  • Days After Shooting, Canada Proposes New Restrictions On and Offline
    New submitter o_ferguson writes As Slashdot reported earlier this week, a lone shooter attacked the war memorial and parliament buildings in Ottawa, Canada on Wednesday. As many comments predicted, the national government has seized this as an opportunity to roll out considerable new regressive legislation, including measures designed to* increase data access for domestic intelligence services, institute a new form of extra-judicial detention, and, perhaps most troubling, criminalize some forms of religious and political speech online. As an example of the type of speech that could, in future, be grounds for prosecution, the article mentions that the killer's website featured "a black ISIS flag and rejoiced that 'disbelievers' will be consigned to the fires of Hell for eternity." A government MP offers the scant assurance that this legislation is not "trauma tainted," as it was drafted well prior to this week's instigating incidents. Needless to say, some internet observes remain, as always, highly skeptical of the manner in which events are being portrayed. (Please note that some articles may be partially paywalled unless opened in a private/incognito browser window.)







  • AT&T Locks Apple SIM Cards On New iPads
    As reported by MacRumors, the unlocked, carrier-switchable SIM cards built into the newest iPads aren't necessarily so -- at least if you buy them from an AT&T store. Though the card comes from Apple with the ability to support (and be switched among with software, if a change is necessary) all major carriers, "AT&T is not supporting this interchangeability and is locking the SIM included with cellular models of the iPad Air 2 and Retina iPad mini 3 after it is used with an AT&T plan. ... AT&T appears to be the only participating carrier that is locking the Apple SIM to its network. T-Mobile's John Legere has indicated that T-Mobile's process does not lock a customer in to T-Mobile, which appears to be confirmed by Apple's support document, and Sprint's process also seems to leave the Apple SIM unlocked and able to be used with other carrier plans. Verizon, the fourth major carrier in the United States, did not opt to allow the Apple SIM to work with its network." The iPad itself can still be activated and used on other networks, but only after the installation of a new SIM.







  • Passwords: Too Much and Not Enough
    An anonymous reader writes: Sophos has a blog post up saying, "attempts to get users to choose passwords that will resist offline guessing, e.g., by composition policies, advice and strength meters, must largely be judged failures." They say a password must withstand 1,000,000 guesses to survive an online attack but 100,000,000,000,000 to have any hope against an offline one. "Not only is the difference between those two numbers mind-bogglingly large, there is no middle ground." "Passwords falling between the two thresholds offer no improvement in real-world security, they're just harder to remember." System administrators "should stop worrying about getting users to create strong passwords and should focus instead on properly securing password databases and detecting leaks when they happen."







  • Verizon Injects Unique IDs Into HTTP Traffic
    An anonymous reader writes: Verizon Wireless, the nation's largest wireless carrier, is now also a real-time data broker. According to a security researcher at Stanford, Big Red has been adding a unique identifier to web traffic. The purpose of the identifier is advertisement targeting, which is bad enough. But the design of the system also functions as a 'supercookie' for any website that a subscriber visits. "Any website can easily track a user, regardless of cookie blocking and other privacy protections. No relationship with Verizon is required. ...while Verizon offers privacy settings, they don’t prevent sending the X-UIDH header. All they do, seemingly, is prevent Verizon from selling information about a user." Just like they said they would.







  • Secretive Funding Fuels Ongoing Net Neutrality Astroturfing Controversy
    alphadogg writes: The contentious debate about net neutrality in the U.S. has sparked controversy over a lack of funding transparency for advocacy groups and think tanks, which critics say subverts the political process. News stories from a handful of publications in recent months have accused some think tanks and advocacy groups of "astroturfing" — quietly shilling for large broadband carriers. In a handful of cases, those criticisms appear to have some merit, although the term is so overused by people looking to discredit political opponents that it has nearly lost its original meaning. An IDG News Service investigation found that major groups opposing U.S. Federal Communications Commission reclassification and regulation of broadband as a public utility tend to be less transparent about their funding than the other side. Still, some big-name advocates of strong net neutrality rules also have limited transparency mechanisms in place.







  • A Low Cost, Open Source Geiger Counter (Video)
    Sawaiz Syed's LinkedIn page says he's a "Hardware Developer at GSU [Georgia State University], Department of Physics." That's a great workplace for someone who designs low cost radiation detectors that can be air-dropped into an area where there has been a nuclear accident (or a nuclear attack; or a nuclear terrorist act) and read remotely by a flying drone or a robot ground vehicle. This isn't Sawaiz's only project; it's just the one Timothy asked him about most at the recent Maker Faire Atlanta. (Alternate Video Link)







  • Computer Scientist Parachutes From 135,908 Feet, Breaking Record
    An anonymous reader writes: The NY Times reports that Alan Eustace, a computer scientist and senior VP at Google, has successfully broken the record for highest freefall jump, set by Felix Baumgartner in 2012. "For a little over two hours, the balloon ascended at speeds up to 1,600 feet per minute to an altitude of 135,908 feet, more than 25 miles. Mr. Eustace dangled underneath in a specially designed spacesuit with an elaborate life-support system. He returned to earth just 15 minutes after starting his fall. ... Mr. Eustace cut himself loose from the balloon with the aid of a small explosive device and plummeted toward the earth at a speeds that peaked at more than 800 miles per hour, setting off a small sonic boom heard by observers on the ground. ... His technical team had designed a carbon-fiber attachment that kept him from becoming entangled in the main parachute before it opened. About four-and-a-half minutes into his flight, he opened the main parachute and glided to a landing 70 miles from the launch site."







  • Researcher Finds Tor Exit Node Adding Malware To Downloads
    Trailrunner7 writes: A security researcher has identified a Tor exit node that was actively patching binaries users download, adding malware to the files dynamically. The discovery, experts say, highlights the danger of trusting files downloaded from unknown sources and the potential for attackers to abuse the trust users have in Tor and similar services. Josh Pitts of Leviathan Security Group ran across the misbehaving Tor exit node while performing some research on download servers that might be patching binaries during download through a man-in-the middle attack. What Pitts found during his research is that an attacker with a MITM position can actively patch binaries–if not security updates–with his own code. In terms of defending against the sort of attack, Pitts suggested that encrypted download channels are the best option, both for users and site operators. "SSL/TLSis the only way to prevent this from happening. End-users may want to consider installing HTTPS Everywhere or similar plugins for their browser to help ensure their traffic is always encrypted," he said via email.







  • Employers Worried About Critical Thinking Skills
    Nerval's Lobster writes: Every company needs employees who can analyze information effectively, discarding what's unnecessary and digging down into what's actually useful. But employers are getting a little bit worried that U.S. schools aren't teaching students the necessary critical-thinking skills to actually succeed once they hit the open marketplace. The Wall Street Journal talked with several companies about how they judge critical-thinking skills, a few of which ask candidates to submit to written tests to judge their problem-solving abilities. But that sidesteps the larger question: do schools need to shift their focus onto different teaching methods (i.e., downplaying the need for students to memorize lots of information), or is our educational pipeline just fine, thank you very much?







  • Recent Nobel Prize Winner Revolutionizes Microscopy Again
    An anonymous reader writes: Eric Betzig recently shared in the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for his work on high-resolution microscopy. Just yesterday, Betzig and a team of researchers published a new microscopy technique (abstract) that "allows them to observe living cellular processes at groundbreaking resolution and speed." According to the article, "Until now, the best microscope for viewing living systems as they moved were confocal microscopes. They beam light down onto a sample of cells. The light penetrates the whole sample and bounces back. ... The light is toxic, and degrades the living system over time. Betzig's new microscope solves this by generating a sheet of light that comes in from the side of the sample, made up of a series of beams that harm the sample less than one solid cone of light. Scientists can now snap a high-res image of the entire section they're illuminating, without exposing the rest of the sample to any light at all."







  • Decades-old Scientific Paper May Hold Clues To Dark Matter
    sciencehabit writes: Here's one reason libraries hang on to old science journals: A paper from an experiment conducted 32 years ago may shed light on the nature of dark matter, the mysterious stuff whose gravity appears to keep the galaxies from flying apart. The old data put a crimp in the newfangled concept of a 'dark photon' and suggest that a simple bargain-basement experiment could put the idea to the test. The data come from E137, a "beam dump" experiment that ran from 1980 to 1982 at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in Menlo Park, California. In the experiment, physicists slammed a beam of high-energy electrons, left over from other experiments, into an aluminum target to see what would come out. Researchers placed a detector 383 meters behind the target, on the other side of a sandstone hill 179 meters thick that blocked any ordinary particles.







  • PCGamingWiki Looks Into Linux Gaming With 'Port Reports'
    AberBeta writes: PCGamingWiki contributor Soeb has been looking into the recent larger budget game releases to appear on Linux, including XCOM: Enemy Unknown and Borderlands: The Pre–Sequel produced by Mac porting houses Feral and Aspyr. Soeb reports that while feature parity is high, performance could be a bit better. Performance differences aside, the games are finally arriving on Linux — now the userbase needs to expand to make a virtuous cycle.







  • How To Beat Online Price Discrimination
    New submitter Intrepid imaginaut sends word of a study (PDF) into how e-commerce sites show online shoppers different prices depending on how they found an item and what the sites know about the customer. "For instance, the study found, users logged in to Cheaptickets and Orbitz saw lower hotel prices than shoppers who were not registered with the sites. Home Depot shoppers on mobile devices saw higher prices than users browsing on desktops. Some searchers on Expedia and Hotels.com consistently received higher-priced options, a result of randomized testing by the websites. Shoppers at Sears, Walmart, Priceline, and others received results in a different order than control groups, a tactic known as “steering.” To get a better price, the article advises deleting cookies before shopping, using your browser's private mode, putting the items in your shopping cart without buying them right away, and using tools like Camelcamelcamel to keep an eye out for price drops.







  • Automation Coming To Restaurants, But Not Because of Minimum Wage Hikes
    dcblogs writes: McDonald's this week told financial analysts of its plans to install self-ordering kiosks and mobile ordering at its restaurants. This news prompted the Wall Street Journal to editorialize, in " Minimum Wage Backfire," that while it may be true for McDonald's to say that its tech plans will improve customer experience, the move is also "a convenient way...to justify a reduction in the chain's global workforce." Minimum wage increase advocates, the Journal argued, are speeding along an automation backlash. But banks have long relied on ATMs, and grocery stores, including Walmart, have deployed self-service checkouts. In contrast, McDonald's hasn't changed its basic system of taking orders since its founding in the 1950s, said Darren Tristano, executive vice president of Technomic, a research group focused on the restaurant industry. While mobile, kiosks and table ordering systems may help reduce labor costs, the automated self-serve technology is seen as an essential. It will take the stress out of ordering (lines) at fast food restaurants, and the wait for checks at more casual restaurants. It also helps with upselling and membership to loyalty programs. People who can order a drink refill off a tablet, instead of waving down waitstaff, may be more inclined to do so. Moreover, analysts say younger customers want self-service options.







  • FTDI Removes Driver From Windows Update That Bricked Cloned Chips
    New submitter weilawei writes: Last night, FTDI, a Scottish manufacturer of USB-to-serial ICs, posted a response to the ongoing debacle over its allegedly intentional bricking of competitors' chips. In their statement, FTDI CEO Fred Dart said, "The recently release driver release has now been removed from Windows Update so that on-the-fly updating cannot occur. The driver is in the process of being updated and will be released next week. This will still uphold our stance against devices that are not genuine, but do so in a non-invasive way that means that there is no risk of end user's hardware being directly affected." This may have resulted from a discussion with Microsoft engineers about the implications of distributing potentially malicious driver software. If you design hardware, what's your stance on this? Will you continue to integrate FTDI chips into your products? What alternatives are available to replace their functionality?







  • Stem Cells Grown From Patient's Arm Used To Replace Retina
    BarbaraHudson writes: The Globe and Mail is reporting the success of a procedure to implant a replacement retina grown from cells from the patient's skin. Quoting: "Transplant doctors are stepping gingerly into a new world, one month after a Japanese woman received the first-ever tissue transplant using stem cells that came from her own skin, not an embryo. On Sept. 12, doctors in a Kobe hospital replaced the retina of a 70-year-old woman suffering from macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the developed world. The otherwise routine surgery was radical because scientists had grown the replacement retina in a petri dish, using skin scraped from the patient's arm. The Japanese woman is fine and her retinal implant remains in place. Researchers around the world are now hoping to test other stem-cell-derived tissues in therapy. Dr. Jeanne Loring from the Scripps Research Institute in La Jolla, Calif., expects to get approval within a few years to see whether neurons derived from stem cells can be used to treat Parkinson's disease."







  • Detritus From Cancer Cells May Infect Healthy Cells
    bmahersciwriter writes Tiny bubbles of cell membrane — called exosomes — are shed by most cells. Long thought to be mere trash, researchers had recently noticed that they often contain short, regulatory RNA molecules, suggesting that exosomes may be one way that cells communicate with one another. Now, it appears that RNA in the exosomes shed by tumor cells can get into healthy cells and 'transform' them, putting them on the path to becoming cancerous themselves.







  • British Army Looking For Gamers For Their Smart-Tanks
    concertina226 writes The U.K. branch of global defense firm General Dynamics is working on a futuristic state-of-the-art smart-tank to replace the British Army's aging armored vehicle fleet, to be delivered to the Ministry of Defense in 2020. The Scout SV armored vehicle is the first fully-digitized armored fighting vehicle to have been built for the British Army, and is far bigger and more durable than any of its existing tanks, which are now at least 20 years old. The tank comes in six variants that can be customized with a tools for different missions, and has numerous sensors, cameras, and sights to offer real-time intelligence on weather conditions, target acquisition, and reconnaissance — all crucial battlefield data required by commanders to access and direct situations. "With the capability in the Scout SV, we're really looking for the type of people who play Xbox games – tech-savvy people who are able to take in a lot of information and process it in the proper way," says Kevin Connell, the vice president for General Dynamic UK's Land Systems Regiment.







  • Incapacitating Chemical Agents: Coming Soon To Local Law Enforcement?
    Lasrick writes To this day, Russian authorities refuse to disclose the incapacitating chemical agent (ICA) they employed in their attempt, 12 years ago, to save 900 hostages held in a theater by Chechen fighters. Malcom Dando elaborates on a new report (PDF) that Russia, China, Israel, and a slew of other countries are continuing research into ICAs, and the apparent indifference of the international community into such research. Proponents of ICAs have long promoted their use in a variety of scenarios, including that of law enforcement, because in theory these chemicals incapacitate without permanent disability. Critics, however, point out that these weapons rely on exact dosage to prevent fatality, and that the ability to 'deliver the right agent to the right people in the right dose without exposing the wrong people, or delivering the wrong dose' is a near-impossible expectation. ICAs represent the further misuse and militarization of the life sciences and a weakening of the taboo against the weaponization of toxic substances, and the idea that they could be used in law enforcement situations is a disturbing one."







  • NY Doctor Recently Back From West Africa Tests Positive For Ebola
    An anonymous reader writes An emergency room doctor who recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa has tested positive for the virus, Mayor Bill de Blasio said. It's the first case in the city and the fourth in the nation. From the article: "The doctor, identified as Craig Spencer, 33, came back from treating Ebola patients in Guinea about 10 days ago, and developed a fever, nausea, pain and fatigue Wednesday night. The physician, employed at New York's Columbia Presbyterian Hospital, has been in isolation at Bellevue Hospital in Manhattan since Thursday morning, the official said."







  • Tracking a Bitcoin Thief
    An anonymous reader writes A small group of researchers were able to publish an investigative report on the hacking of a popular Bitcoin exchange earlier this year by the name of CryptoRush.in. Close to a million dollars stolen in crypto currency lead the group to discover evidence, track down the attacker and put together a timeline of what exactly happened. A captivating read for a community desensitized by thefts, hackings and lack of reporting. With pictures, and logs to prove it all.







  • How Sony, Intel, and Unix Made Apple's Mac a PC Competitor
    smaxp writes In 2007, Sony's supply chain lessons, the network effect from the shift to Intel architecture, and a better OS X for developers combined to renew the Mac's growth. The network effects of the Microsoft Wintel ecosystem that Rappaport explained 20 years ago in the Harvard Business Review are no longer a big advantage. By turning itself into a premium PC company with a proprietary OS, Apple has taken the best of PC ecosystem, but avoided taking on the disadvantages.







  • SMART Begins Live Public Robocar Tests In Singapore
    Hallie Siegel writes Robocar R&D is moving fast in Singapore, and this week, the National University of Singapore (NUS) announced they will be doing a live public demo of their autonomous golf carts over a course with 10 stops in the Singapore Chinese and Japanese Gardens. The public will be able to book rides online, and then summon and direct the vehicles with their phones. The vehicles will have a touch tablet where the steering wheel will go. Rides will be free, and will take place Oct. 23-25, Oct. 30-31 and Nov. 1.









  • Google CEO Larry Page gives Sundar Pichai keys to the kingdom
    Android, Chrome boss moves another step closer to Choc Factory's top job
    Ten years after joining Google and with running Android, Chrome, and Google Apps already on his plate, Sundar Pichai's star has now risen even higher, gaining a new tranche of responsibilities in the process.…



  • LG taps TSMC to bake its first-ever mobile chip
    Joins Apple, Samsung in ARM chipmaking party with Nuclun
    South Korea's LG Electronics has announced its first self-made mobile system-on-chip (SoC), along with plans to debut the chip in a new smartphone to be released within the week.…






  • Wanna hop carriers with your iPad's Apple SIM? Don't hop on AT&T
    Not unless you want your network-swapping tech disabled for good, that is
    If you're looking forward to using the new iPads' multi-carrier Apple SIM in the US, don't pick AT&T as your first choice – or you'll lose the ability to switch to another carrier altogether.…


  • FTDI yanks chip-bricking driver from Windows Update, vows to fight on
    Next driver to battle fake chips with 'non-invasive' methods
    Chipmaker FTDI has pulled a driver from Windows Update that could brick devices containing knockoff versions of its USB-to-serial bridge chips, but says it won't back down on its aggressive anti-counterfeiting stance.…






  • iMessage SPAM floods US mobile networks
    iSpam knockoff goods scam
    China-based counterfeiters are spamvertising knock-off designer goods using Apple iMessage instead of using conventional email spam runs.…






  • Bitcasa bins $10-a-month Infinite storage offer
    Firm cites 'low demand' plus 'abusers'
    Comment One of the oddest cloud storage offers ever has just been binned as Bitcasa bumps into reality. When sprats are competing with killer whales what do you expect?…



  • Techies: Meet the Microsoft A Team at Future Decoded
    Brian Cox, Sir Nigel Shadbolt at Tech Day, ExCeL, 12 Nov
    Promo Microsoft is running a huge conference - Future Decoded - in London’s ExCeL centre on November 10-12. The Tech Day on Day 3 has a huge agenda, big name keynote speakers, eight training tracks – and one track dedicated to entrepreneurial startups and students.…





  • We chat to CloudFlare about its 'EVERYBODY GETS SSL' venture
    Has gutsy move generated biz?
    Interview CloudFlare boss Matthew Prince is hoping the firm's project to roll out SSL support to customers who use its free cloud-based web hosting service will inspire other internet firms to build out a fully encrypted web.…


  • Meet Mr Gamification: He's got a NUDGE or two for you
    Geddit?!?
    Battle of Ideas Do you ever get invited to talk and wish that Steve Bong was there instead of you? That’s what happened to me last weekend. The subject was "gamification" at the Battle of Ideas. Things got really strange, really quickly – I think you’ll find what is coming up to be quite eye-opening - but I’m sure Steve would have taken it all in his stride.…




  • Pssst. Want to buy a timeshare in the clouds?
    The Google dilemma — controller or spreader of knowledge?
    Comment Three questions: is baby turning into a monster? Are we desktop/notebook/tablet/smartphone users becoming the near-as-dammit slaves of social media and retail monopolists? Are these monopolists destroying jobs and impoverishing people faster than networked smart device and software technologies are creating jobs and enriching their users' lives?…


  • WIN a 1TB monster Samsung EVO 840 SSD
    Three solid state scorchers up for grabs
    Competition SSDs, doncha love ’em? Blisteringly fast and no mechanical parts but all too often you’re faced with a capacity compromise. Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that are worth over £300 apiece.…




  • Rackspace launches big red rack eater
    RackConnect 3.0 release gives Rackspace a much better hybrid cloud story
    Rackspace has flicked the switch on the third version of its RackConnect hybrid cloud-maker.…


  • Adorkable overshare of words like photobomb in this year's dictionaries
    And hipsters are finally defined as self-loathing. Sort of
    Adorkable, photobomb, overshare, Tinder. What do these words have in common? Apart from being ridiculous portmanteaus and brand names that have made their way into common usage, they’re also words that will feature in this year’s new dictionaries.…



  • 'Careful management of headcount' for Juniper after tepid quarter
    Translation: the razor's swinging, at customers and in Juniper's back office
    Juniper Networks has reported a difficult third quarter that left CEO Shaygan Kheradpir “disappointed” by “lower-than-anticipated demand from service providers, particularly in the U.S.”…







  • Moscow, Beijing poised to sign deal on joint cyber security ops
    Russian, Chinese security projects on the horizon
    Moscow and Beijing will next month sign a deal to commence joint information security projects and operations, and to increase cooperation in the space, according to a popular Russian newspaper with ties to President Vladimir Putin.…


  • Jeff Bezos rolls up another $437m, lights Amazon's cigar with it
    Another lossmaking quarter despite sales of over $20bn
    It's not black magic that Amazon works on its financial results each quarter but red magic – because however massive a haul of cash the company pulls in, it just can't seem to turn a profit. Odd, that.…


  • Facebook, IBM, court future Chinese elite
    Zuckerberg and Rometty join advisory board of top business school
    Beijing's Tsinghua University School of Economics and Management has signed up two tech titans to its advisory board: Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and IBM President and CEO Ginni Rometty.…






Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM