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  • Red Hat: 2017:1126-01: kernel: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for kernel is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.2 Advanced Update Support. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2017:1125-01: kernel: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for kernel is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.2 Extended Update Support. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact [More...]









  • Red Hat: 2017:1119-01: java-1.6.0-sun: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for java-1.6.0-sun is now available for Oracle Java for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and Oracle Java for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2017:1118-01: java-1.7.0-oracle: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for java-1.7.0-oracle is now available for Oracle Java for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and Oracle Java for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2017:1117-01: java-1.8.0-oracle: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for java-1.8.0-oracle is now available for Oracle Java for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and Oracle Java for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact [More...]


  • How to make branding decisions in an open community
    On April 18, Docker founder Solomon Hykes made a big announcement via a pull request in the main Docker repo: "Docker is transitioning all of its open source collaborations to the Moby project going forward." The docker/docker repo now redirects to moby/moby, and Solomon's pull request updates the README and logo for the project to match.read more



  • Mentor tips Azure IoT support and Linux-driven self-driving tech
    Mentor announced Azure Certified for IoT compliance for Mentor Embedded Linux, and unveiled a Linux-based “DRS360” self-driving car platform. Mentor, which has long offered its Yocto Project based Mentor Embedded Linux (MEL) commercial Linux distribution, announced new Microsoft Azure cloud support for MEL, as well as its Nucleus RTOS. Earlier this month, its Mentor Automotive […]


  • A new Android app for teaching kids how to read
    Have you been looking for software to help your child to read? Well, your quest may be over.Phoenicia is a new literacy application for Android developed by Michael Hall, an open source software developer, community manager, and technology evangelist currently working at Canonical, maker of Ubuntu. In this interview, he talks about the diagnosis of his oldest child with an Autism Spectrum Disorder, his learning curve of Android development, and why user testing matters more than you think.read more


  • LC3 2017 Features Open Source Experts in SDN, Cloud, DevOps, and More
    Developers, architects, sysadmins, DevOps experts, business leaders, and other professionals will gather in China June 19-20 to discuss the latest open source technology and trends at LinuxCon + ContainerCon + CloudOpen China 2017 (LC3).This event -- held for the first time in Beijing, China -- features three conferences in one, with more than 100 conference sessions focusing on topics such as Kubernetes, Cloud Native [he]amp[/he] Containers, Linux...



  • Why and how to publish your work and opinions
    This free webinar, "Why and How to Publish Your Work and Opinionsm" will be given by Opensource.com Editor and Community Manager Rikki Endsley and Linux.com Editor Libby Clark. Learn how to successfully publish your technical work and viewpoints, as well as how to identify publications to target.




  • More than just apps: 5 innovative uses for C#
    The .NET platform has always been a mainstay of the desktop and server app development field, powering Windows Forms, WPF, ASP.NET, and many years of Line of Business (LOB) apps. Today, however, .NET is a very different platform; it's powered by an open-source API-based compiler platform, features in-built scripting capabilities, and C# can be authored effectively in many IDEs, not just from Microsoft.read more


  • How I became a webcomic artist in less than a month with open source tools
    If you are reading this, you probably care about, or are at least mildly interested in, open source. Like you, I care about and am interested in open source. Perhaps unlike you, I am also a webcomic artist. You can find my work at Herpaderp.party.This is a story about how I came to use and, indeed, vaunt open source. I'll also tell you about how and why I produce my comic using open source tools and infrastructure.read more


  • How Operation Code helps veterans learn programming skills
    After leaving the military, Army Captain David Molina knew he wanted to go into software development. As Molina did research on the field, he found himself overwhelmed by the vast amount of information and choices. For example: What coding language is the right one to learn? What language is the most valuable for being competitive in the job market? To add to the confusion, there are a myriad of for-profit code schools that are proliferating at an exponential rate, and each one advertises career outcomes for a fraction of the cost of a four-year computer science degree.read more


  • Share Fedora: Difficult Conversations
    Last week the Fedora community was asked to share ideas for maintaining existing community. Opensource.com collected many great responses. This week the blogging challenge continues with ideas on how to measure success. The Fedora Project is focused on this, like... Continue Reading →



  • Uber cloaked its spying and all it got from Apple was a slap on the wrist
    Greyball snoopware even 'geofenced' CupertinoUber hid its fingerprinting of iPhone users from Apple – techniques that would have had any other app thrown out of Apple's store. Uber retained the information even after the Uber app had been deleted and the phone had been wiped. Uber CEO Travis Kalanick got a personal reprimand from Apple CEO Tim Cook, but the app stayed put, and Uber continues to use fingerprinting worldwide.…



  • Open source group focuses on industrial IoT gateway middleware
    The Linux Foundation has launched an open source, cross-platform “EdgeX Foundry” project based on Dell’s FUSE for standardizing middleware on IoT gateways. The new EdgeX Foundry organization will develop modular, cross-platform middleware for industrial IoT edge gateways. Based on a Dell FUSE project, the open source group aims to simplify and standardize industrial IoT edge […]


  • Libreswan based Ipsec VPN using preshared and RSA keys on Ubuntu
    The purpose of this tutorial is to explore LibreSwan which provides an IPsec protocol implementation. It is available in RedHat distributions, however, it can be compiled for another platform such as Ubuntu/Debian easily. In this article, the LibreSwan tool is built from source on Ubuntu, then a two peer VPN is configured using preshared & RSA keys between the gateway devices.


  • Assimilate Go Programming with Open Source Books
    Go is a compiled, statically typed programming language that makes it easy to build simple, reliable, and efficient software. It’s a general purpose programming language with modern features, clean syntax and a robust well-documented common library, making it a good candidate to learn as your first programming language. While it borrows ideas from other languages such as Algol and C, it has a very different character. It’s sometimes described as a simple language.



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  • The Shape Of Income In America
    This chart shows how weekly incomes for workers 25 and older vary by education level, gender, and race/ethnicity. Each bar represents an education level — less than high school, high school, some college, bachelor's degree, and advanced degrees.






  • Can Facebook Fix Its Own Worst Bug?
    Mark Zuckerberg now acknowledges the dangerous side of the social revolution he helped to start. But is the most powerful tool for connection in human history capable of adapting to the world it created?




  • The First 100 Days
    Candid reviews from more than a dozen historians, activists, and White House veterans on President Trump’s progress.



  • Marissa Mayer Will Make $186 Million On Yahoo’s Sale To Verizon
    Yahoo shareholders are expected to vote on June 8th to end Marissa Mayer’s largely unsuccessful five-year effort to restore the internet pioneer to greatness and sell the company to Verizon. But Mayer, the company’s chief executive, will be well compensated for her failure





  • Learn How To Code
    Get 80+ hours of training with this immersive, multi-faceted coding bundle. (And maybe even get that job you want.)




  • How Hollywood Remembers Steve Bannon
    He says that, before he became a senior adviser to the President, he was a successful player in the film industry. But what did he actually do?







  • Hawaii's Online Gaming Curse
    The island’s physical isolation adds milliseconds of latency to an internet connection. In competitive eSports, milliseconds matter.


  • Can Lasers Help Stop Malaria?
    To combat malaria, which afflicts hundreds of millions of people ever year, researchers are reviving a field of study grounded in both music and biology: wingbeat frequency.





  • We Are Lisa Simpson
    Lisa Simpson and every ambitious, out-of-place or caring woman hold a special relationship.






  • Suicide And The Rural ER
    Rural patients struggling with mental-health issues often use the emergency room as their first point of contact with the medical system. But the next step in treatment is uncertain — or nonexistent — for patients without deep pockets.












  • Antivirus Webroot Deletes Windows Files, Causes Serious Problems For Users
    Users of Webroot's endpoint security product, consumers and businesses alike, had a nasty surprise Monday when the program started flagging Windows files as malicious. From a report: The reports quickly popped up on Twitter and continued on the Webroot community forum -- 14 pages and counting. The company came up with a manual fix to address the issue, but many users still had problems recovering their affected systems. The problem is what's known in the antivirus industry as a "false positive" -- a case where a clean file is flagged as malicious and is blocked or deleted. False positive incidents can range in impact from merely annoying -- for example, when a program cannot run anymore -- to crippling, where the OS itself is affected and no longer boots. The Webroot incident falls somewhere in the middle because it affected legitimate Windows files and sent them to quarantine. This is somewhat unusual because antivirus firms typically build whitelists of OS files specifically to prevent false positive detections.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Wikipedia Founder Jimmy Wales is Launching an Online Publication To Fight Fake News
    Jimmy Wales, a founder of Wikipedia, is launching a new online publication which will aim to fight fake news by pairing professional journalists with an army of volunteer community contributors. The news site is called Wikitribune. From a report: "We want to make sure that you read fact-based articles that have a real impact in both local and global events," the publication's website states. The site will publish news stories written by professional journalists. But in a page borrowed from Wikipedia, internet users will be able to propose factual corrections and additions. The changes will be reviewed by volunteer fact checkers. Wikitribune says it will be transparent about its sources. It will post the full transcripts of interviews, as well as video and audio, "to the maximum extent possible." The language used will be "factual and neutral."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Gamers in Hawaii Can't Compete... Because of Latency
    Sometimes it's very important to know that the servers of the web services you're using are situated somewhere in your neighbourhood. And it's not just because of privacy concerns. The Outline has a story this week in which it talks about gamers in Hawaii who're increasingly finding it difficult to compete in global tournaments because the games' servers are almost every time placed overseas. From the article: [...] The game's server is in Chicago. That means if you live in the Midwest, your computer can communicate with it almost instantaneously. If you're in L.A., it can take roughly 60 milliseconds. But if you're in Hawaii, it can take 120 milliseconds, with some players reporting as long as 200 milliseconds. And at the highest echelons of competitive video gaming, milliseconds matter. [...] In League and other eSports games, playing on a high ping is a big disadvantage. The goal of the game is to set up defenses to protect your base while pushing forward to capture the enemy's base, and there are typically lightning bolts and fireballs and slime-spitting dragons shooting across the screen. Playing on a high ping means players may not see all of the action that happens in a game. Latency can really screw things up for a young eSports scene, said Zack Johnson, who runs gg Circuit, a global tournament provider for gaming centers like PC Gamerz. Players on the mainland sometimes say they don't want to compete against Hawaii players, he said, because the high ping throws things off.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Marissa Mayer Will Make $186 Million on Yahoo's Sale To Verizon
    Vindu Goel, reporting for the NYTimes: Yahoo shareholders will vote June 8 on whether to sell the company's internet businesses to Verizon Communications for $4.48 billion. A yes vote, which is widely expected, would end Marissa Mayer's largely unsuccessful five-year effort to restore the internet pioneer to greatness. But Ms. Mayer, the company's chief executive, will be well compensated for her failure. Her Yahoo stock, stock options and restricted stock units are worth a total of $186 million, based on Monday's stock price of $48.15, according to data filed on Monday in the documents sent to shareholders about the Verizon deal. That compensation, which will be fully vested at the time of the shareholder vote, does not include her salary and bonuses over the past five years, or the value of other stock that Ms. Mayer has already sold. All told, her time at Yahoo will have netted her well over $200 million, according to calculations based on company filings.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • BrickerBot, the Permanent Denial-of-Service Botnet, Is Back With a Vengeance
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: BrickerBot, the botnet that permanently incapacitates poorly secured Internet of Things devices before they can be conscripted into Internet-crippling denial-of-service armies, is back with a new squadron of foot soldiers armed with a meaner arsenal of weapons. Pascal Geenens, the researcher who first documented what he calls the permanent denial-of-service botnet, has dubbed the fiercest new instance BrickerBot.3. It appeared out of nowhere on April 20, exactly one month after BrickerBot.1 first surfaced. Not only did BrickerBot.3 mount a much quicker number of attacks -- with 1,295 attacks coming in just 15 hours -- it used a modified attack script that added several commands designed to more completely shock and awe its targets. BrickerBot.1, by comparison, fired 1,895 volleys during the four days it was active, and the still-active BrickerBot.2 has spit out close to 12 attacks per day. Shortly after BrickerBot.3 began attacking, Geenens discovered BrickerBot.4. Together, the two newly discovered instances have attempted to attack devices in the research honeypot close to 1,400 times in less than 24 hours. Like BrickerBot.1, the newcomer botnets are made up of IoT devices running an outdated version of the Dropbear SSH server with public, geographically dispersed IP addresses. Those two characteristics lead Geenens to suspect the attacking devices are poorly secured IoT devices themselves that someone has compromised and used to permanently take out similarly unsecured devices. Geenens, of security firm Radware, has more details here.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Intel Launches Optane Memory That Makes Standard Hard Drives Perform Like SSDs
    MojoKid writes: Intel has officially launched its Optane Memory line of Solid State Drives today, lifting embargo on performance benchmark results as well. Optane Memory is designed to accelerate the storage subsystem on compatible machines, to improve transfer speeds, and reduce latency. It is among the first products to leverage 3D XPoint memory technology that was co-developed by Intel and Micron, offering many of the same properties as NAND flash memory, but with higher endurance and certain performance characteristics that are similar to DRAM. The SSD can be paired to the boot drive in a system, regardless of the capacity or drive type, though Optane Memory will most commonly be linked to slower hard drives. Optane Memory is used as a high-speed repository, as usage patterns on the hard drive are monitored and the most frequently accessed bits of data are copied from the boot drive to the Optane SSD. Since the SSD is used as a cache, it is not presented to the end-user as a separate volume and works transparently in the background. Paired with an inexpensive SATA hard drive, general system performance is more in line with an NVMe SSD. In benchmark testing, Intel Optane Memory delivers a dramatic lift in overall system performance. Boot times, application load time, file searches, and overall system responsiveness are improved significantly. Setting up Intel Optane Memory is also quick and easy with "set it and forget it" type of solution. Optane Memory modules will hit retail this week in 16GB and 32GB capacities, at $44 and $77, respectively.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • In Preparation For Model 3, Tesla Plans To Double the Size of Its Supercharger Network This Year
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from Fortune: Tesla says it will double the number of electric vehicle chargers in its network this year as the automaker prepares for the production of its mass-market vehicle the Model 3. The plan, announced Monday in a blog post on the company's website, will grow its global network of Superchargers from more than 5,400 today to more than 10,000 by the end of the year. Tesla, which had previously announced in its annual shareholder letter plans to double the network in North America, did not disclose the cost of such an ambitious expansion. Many sites will soon enter construction to open in advance of the summer travel season, according to Tesla. The company says it will add charging locations within city centers as well as highway sites this year. The goal is to make "charging ubiquitous in urban centers," Tesla says in its blog post. The company says it will build larger sites along busy travel routes to accommodate several dozen Teslas simultaneously. These larger sites will also have customer service centers.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • How Online Shopping Makes Suckers of Us All
    Thelasko shares an excerpt from a report via The Atlantic, which describes how price discrimination is used in online shopping and how businesses like Amazon try to extract consumer surplus: Will you pay more for those shoes before 7 p.m.? Would the price tag be different if you lived in the suburbs? Standard prices and simple discounts are giving way to far more exotic strategies, designed to extract every last dollar from the consumer. We live in the age of the variable airfare, the surge-priced ride, the pay-what-you-want Radiohead album, and other novel price developments. But what was this? Some weird computer glitch? More like a deliberate glitch, it seems. "It's most likely a strategy to get more data and test the right price," Guru Hariharan explained, after I had sketched the pattern on a whiteboard. The right price -- the one that will extract the most profit from consumers' wallets -- has become the fixation of a large and growing number of quantitative types, many of them economists who have left academia for Silicon Valley. It's also the preoccupation of Boomerang Commerce, a five-year-old start-up founded by Hariharan, an Amazon alum. He says these sorts of price experiments have become a routine part of finding that right price -- and refinding it, because the right price can change by the day or even by the hour. (Amazon says its price changes are not attempts to gather data on customers' spending habits, but rather to give shoppers the lowest price out there.)
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • A Caterpillar May Lead To a 'Plastic Pollution' Solution
    New submitter FatdogHaiku quotes a report from BBC: Researchers at Cambridge University have discovered that the larvae of the moth, which eats wax in bee hives, can also degrade plastic. Experiments show the insect can break down the chemical bonds of plastic in a similar way to digesting beeswax. The plastic is used to make shopping bags and food packaging, among other things, but it can take hundreds of years to decompose completely. However, caterpillars of the moth (Galleria mellonella) can make holes in a plastic bag in under an hour. They think microbes in the caterpillar -- as well as the insect itself -- might play a role in breaking down plastic. If the chemical process can be identified, it could lead to a solution to managing plastic waste in the environment.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Uber Gets Sued Over Alleged 'Hell' Program To Track Lyft Drivers
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: Uber has another lawsuit on its hands. This time, it's about Uber's alleged use of a program called "Hell." The plaintiff, Michael Gonzales, drove for Lyft during the time Uber allegedly used the software. He's seeking $5 million in a class action lawsuit. As the story goes, Uber allegedly tracked Lyft drivers using a secret software program internally referred to as "Hell." It allegedly let Uber see how many Lyft drivers were available to give rides, and what their prices were. Hell could allegedly also determine if people were driving for both Uber and Lyft. The lawsuit, filed in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California, alleges Uber broadly invaded the privacy of the Lyft drivers, specifically violated the California Invasion of Privacy Act and Federal Wiretap Act and engaged in unfair competition. Uber has not confirmed nor outright denied the claims.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Square Said To Acquire Team From Struggling Social App Yik Yak
    According to Bloomberg, Square has acquired the engineering team of Yik Yak for "less than $3 million." From the report: The payments processor paid less than $3 million for between five and ten of Yik Yak's engineers, according to the person. Atlanta-based Yik Yak's Chief Executive Officer Tyler Droll will not join Square, the person added, asking not to be identified talking about a private matter. Atlanta-based Yik Yak, which started in 2013, created a smartphone app that allowed people to contribute to anonymous chat groups in a narrow geographical radius -- like college campuses.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Slashdot Asks: Which Wireless Carrier Do You Prefer?
    Earlier this year, telecommunications giants like T-Mobile, AT&T, Verizon and Sprint were battling to see who could release the best unlimited data plan(s). T-Mobile started the domino chain reaction with the launch of its "One" unlimited plan in August. But the competition became especially fierce in February when Verizon introduced unlimited data plans of their own, causing Sprint and AT&T to unveil new unlimited data plans that same week, both of which have their own restrictions and pricing. Each of the four major carriers have since continued to tweak their plans to ultimately undercut their competitors and retain as many customers are possible.   Given how almost everyone has a smartphone these days and the thirst for data has never been higher, we'd like to ask you about your current wireless carrier and plan. Which wireless carrier and plan do you have any why? Is there any one carrier or unlimited data plan that stands out from the others? T-Mobile, for example, recently announced that it added 1.1 million customers in Q1 2017, which means that it has added more than 1 million customers every quarter for the past four years. Have they managed to earn your business?
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • NSA's DoublePulsar Kernel Exploit a 'Bloodbath'
    msm1267 quotes a report from Threatpost: A little more than two weeks after the latest ShadowBrokers leak of NSA hacking tools, experts are certain that the DoublePulsar post-exploitation Windows kernel attack will have similar staying power to the Conficker bug, and that pen-testers will be finding servers exposed to the flaws patched in MS17-010 for years to come. MS17-010 was released in March and it closes a number of holes in Windows SMB Server exploited by the NSA. Exploits such as EternalBlue, EternalChampion, EternalSynergy and EternalRomance that are part of the Fuzzbunch exploit platform all drop DoublePulsar onto compromised hosts. DoublePulsar is a sophisticated memory-based kernel payload that hooks onto x86 and 64-bit systems and allows an attacker to execute any raw shellcode payload they wish. "This is a full ring0 payload that gives you full control over the system and you can do what you want to it," said Sean Dillon, senior security analyst at RiskSense. Dillon was the first to reverse-engineer a DoublePulsar payload, and published his analysis last Friday. "This is going to be on networks for years to come. The last major vulnerability of this class was MS08-067, and it's still found in a lot of places," Dillon said. "I find it everywhere. This is the most critical Windows patch since that vulnerability." Dan Tentler, founder and CEO of Phobos Group, said internet-net wide scans he's running have found about 3.1 percent of vulnerable machines are already infected (between 62,000 and 65,000 so far), and that percentage is likely to go up as scans continue. "This is easily describable as a bloodbath," Tentler said.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Lyrebird Claims It Can Recreate Anyone's Voice Based On Just a 1 Minute Sample
    Artem Tashkinov writes: Today, a Canadian artificial intelligence startup named Lyrebird unveiled its voice imitation deep learning algorithm that can mimic a person's voice and have it read any text with a given emotion, based on the analysis of just a few dozen seconds of audio recording. The website features samples using the recreated voices of Donald Trump, Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton. A similar technology was created by Adobe around a year ago but it requires over 20 minutes of recorded speech. The company sets to open its APIs to the public, while the computing for the task will be performed in the cloud.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Verizon's $70 Gigabit Internet Is Half the Price of Older 750Mbps Tier
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: Verizon is now selling what it calls "FiOS Gigabit Connection" for $69.99 a month in a change that boosts top broadband speeds and makes lower prices available to many Internet subscribers. Actual bandwidth will be a bit lower than a gigabit per second, with "downloads as fast as 940Mbps and uploads as fast as 880Mbps," Verizon's announcement today said. The gigabit service is available in most of Verizon's FiOS territory, specifically to "over 8 million homes in parts of the New York, New Jersey, Philadelphia, Richmond, Va., Hampton Roads, Va., Boston, Providence and Washington, D.C. areas," Verizon said. Just three months ago, Verizon boosted its top speeds from 500Mbps to 750Mbps. The standalone 750Mbps Internet service cost $150 a month, more than twice the price of the new gigabit tier. Existing customers who bought that 750Mbps plan "will automatically receive FiOS Gigabit Connection and will see their bills lowered," Verizon said. It's not clear whether they will get their price lowered all the way to $70. It's important to note that the $70 price is only available to new customers, and it's a promotional rate that will "increase after promo period." Additionally, Verizon will charge you a $10 per month router charge unless you pay $150 for the Verizon router, plus other taxes and fees.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.











  • Man nicked trying to 'save' beer from burning building
    She's in there. Who's in there, sir? My PIIIIIIINT!
    A South Dakotan was cuffed after he repeatedly barged past police and firefighters that were trying to deal with a blaze in his apartment block so he could re-enter and rescue his most precious possession - beer.…



  • Jimbo announces Team Wikipedia: 'Global News Police'
    Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?
    Comment When Henry Kissinger received the Nobel Peace Prize against the backdrop of the US Air Force's secret bombings in Cambodia, the satirist Tom Lehrer declared that satire had become obsolete. If satire died that day, then Jimmy Wales has dug it up, exhumed the corpse, and is giving it a state funeral.…










  • Car hacking's dynamic duo offers to save others $1m in research
    Miller and Valasek spread the word on hacking archive
    Two famed car hackers claim they can save fellow tinkerers and security researchers a lot of time and money – by handing over their tools and blueprints for free. The pair boast the gear is worth over a million bucks.…



  • HipChat SlipChat lets hackers RipChat
    They're going to get plenty of LipChat
    IRC-for-biz HipChat says a vulnerability in a software library used by its HipChat.com service allowed hackers to access private conversations and customer account information.…





  • Swamp-draining Trump pushes ex-AT&T lobbyist to oversee AT&T mega-merger
    Also worked for Google, Comcast, Qualcomm...
    Analysis One of the most popular applause lines from Donald Trump's presidential campaign was that he would "drain the swamp" – meaning put an end to the corrupt, revolving door of government and private practice that virtually defines modern Washington, DC.…







  • Forensic accountants appointed to pore over Post Office IT scandal
    Criminal Cases Review Commission confirms investigators in 27 cases
    The UK's Criminal Cases Review Commission has confirmed that it has appointed a firm of forensic accountants to assist its investigation into whether sub-postmasters were wrongfully prosecuted due to issues affecting the Post Office's Horizon IT system.…




  • Seagate launches non-flying disk drive for drones
    Ground-based backup of in-flight drone-recorded data
    Fly Drive is not about car rental any more, not in our version of disk world at any rate. It's a Seagate disk drive for DJI drones and comes just three months after Seagate and drone-maker DJI announced a partnership to develop storage for drone-recorded images and videos.…


  • Uber cloaked its spying and all it got from Apple was a slap on the wrist
    Greyball snoopware even 'geofenced' Cupertino
    Uber hid its fingerprinting of iPhone users from Apple – techniques that would have had any other app thrown out of Apple's store. Uber retained the information even after the Uber app had been deleted and the phone had been wiped. Uber CEO Travis Kalanick got a personal reprimand from Apple CEO Tim Cook, but the app stayed put, and Uber continues to use fingerprinting worldwide.…



  • Apache Foundation hails Metron as new top level project for cybersecurity
    ♪ Straight outta Cisco, crazy app framework called Metron, open-sourced so data's not crept on ♪
    The Apache Software Foundation (ASF) has announced Metron, a cybersecurity applications framework for centralised monitoring and analysis of network traffic, as its newest top-level project.…


  • HPC kids battle each other... oh, and tussle with the world's fastest supercomputer
    Cold, hard cash and cred up for grabs
    HPC Blog This year's edition of the Asian Student Cluster Competition (ASC) is the largest competition of its kind in the world, with 20 teams of university undergrads battling each other, themselves, and the world’s fastest supercomputer, Sunway TaihuLight, to win the Asian Cluster Crown*.…


  • Nokia plans comeback on back of virtual reality
    Faces off with Facebook Surround 360 kit
    Analysis The Nokia as we traditionally know it is no more, and the reborn company of today is pinning a core part of its future business strategy on emerging virtual reality (VR) technologies.…








  • Teen charged with 'cyberstalking' in bomb hoax case
    Hoaxer kept thumb drive of swatting calls
    An 18-year-old dual citizen of the US and Israel has been charged with making a string of online and phone threats against schools and Jewish community centers.…


  • Huawei to build global cloud with bit barns run by different operators
    They'll all look and behave the same, but you won't get one console to rule them all
    Huawei's going to stitch together a global cloud based on its cut of OpenStack. It will consist of a patchwork of Huawei-built clouds that the firm itself runs, and Huawei clouds that are run by telcos.…



Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM