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  • Red Hat: 2015:0094-01: flash-plugin: Critical Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An updated Adobe Flash Player package that fixes multiple security issues is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 and 6 Supplementary. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Critical security [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2015:0093-01: chromium-browser: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated chromium-browser packages that fix multiple security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 Supplementary. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Important security [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2015:0087-01: kernel: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated kernel packages that fix two security issues and several bugs are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Important security [More...]



  • Red Hat: 2015:0092-01: glibc: Critical Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated glibc packages that fix one security issue are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Critical security [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2015:0090-01: glibc: Critical Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated glibc packages that fix one security issue are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Critical security [More...]








  • Low-power x86 SoCs arrive on Qseven and SMARC
    ICOP is prepping its first Qseven and SMARC form-factor COMs based on the x86-based, 800MHz DMP Vortex86DX2 SoC. The Linux-ready COMs support GbE and HDMI. ICOP Technology, a subsidiary of chip designer DMP, has been churning out modules and SBCs based on low-power, x86 DMP Vortex processors for years. The processors have shown up in […]


  • Sony is now actually removing features from PlayStation Vita
    Traditionally, as a console gets older, the console maker adds new features and compatible apps for users to download. Sony is taking the opposite tack with the PlayStation Vita in the coming months, though, planning to disable a few apps and features that have worked on the system since launch.




  • Confessions of a systems librarian
    I decided to become a librarian after my undergraduate because I liked working with computers and the job seemed easy. A friend who’d already taken the plunge enlisted me, telling me how technological libraries had become, which I guess made sense.


  • Installing and using Git and Github on Ubuntu: A beginner's guide
    This tutorial will be a quick setup guide for installing and using Github and how to perform its various functions of creating a repository locally, connecting this repo to the remote host that contains your project (where everyone can see), committing the changes and finally pushing all the content in the local system to Github.


  • The earnestness of being important
    In today’s data-driven, constantly-connected, technology-centric world, we are awash in attention-grabbing content, events, and requests. Like me, I suspect most Opensource.com readers relish this way of life—after all, us technologists created it—except for, that is, when we don’t.


  • Linux Desktop Evolution: Minor, Invisible, or Aesthetic
    In the last two years, the Linux desktop has settled into a period of quiet diversity. The user revolts of 2008-2012 are safely in the past, and users are scattered among at least seven major desktops -- Cinnamon, GNOME, KDE,LXDE, MATE, Unity, and Xfce -- and likely to stay that way.




  • HPC Cluster Grant Accepting Applications!
    Silicon Mechanics, Inc. has announced the open submission period for its 4th annual Research Cluster Grant Program. This competitive grant will award two complete high performance compute clusters to two institutions of higher education and research.


  • Sharing Admin Privileges for Many Hosts Securely
    The problem: you have a large team of admins, with a substantial turnover rate. Maybe contractors come and go. Maybe you have tiers of access, due to restrictions based on geography, admin level or even citizenship (as withsome US government contracts). You need to give these people administrative access to dozens (perhaps hundreds) of hosts, and you can't manage all their accounts on all the hosts.




  • YouTube dumps Flash for HTML5
    In today's open source roundup: YouTube puts another nail in the coffin of Flash. Plus: Your favorite file manager for Linux? And is Ubuntu or Linux Mint the right choice for new users?


  • Docker Project Restructures to Improve Scalability, Openness
    The new structure is designed to ensure the scaling of the project, as it exponentially grows in terms of contributors, code contribution and its technology partner ecosystem," Steve Francia, the new chief operator of the Docker project, told eWEEK


  • Meet KDE at FOSDEM this Weekend
    KDE will be at Europe's largest gathering of free software developering this weekend, taking over the city of Brussels for FOSDEM. We start with the traditional beer event on the Friday, sampling 100 flavours of beer while we mingle with old friends and new. On Saturday we will have a stall showing off Plasma 5.2, our beautiful desktop launched only yesterday.


  • Optimising Raspberry Pi code
    In any low-resource system, you need to make maximum use of what is available. Profiling helps you to figure out where to focus your efforts


  • How the New York Times uses open source
    Marc Frons, senior vice president and chief information officer of the New York Times, discusses how The Times actively contributes to open source communities.


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  • What Silicon Valley Thinks Of Women
    Silicon Valleyis still the kind of place where investors can tweak women who ask them for financing with barbs like, "I don’t like the way women think. They haven’t mastered linear thinking."






  • The College Major Of Every Single Player In The Super Bowl
    Instead of doing the typical (Hey, here are the 30 best Super Bowl plays of all time!), we thought we would dip into the players' pasts and see what they spent the second (probably third or forth actually) most time doing in college. Here is the college major of every player in Super Bowl XLIX.


  • The Big Bang By Balloon
    How an experiment high above Antarctica  —  Spider  —  sheds new light on the cosmic microwave background.





  • The Twins Of Auschwitz
    When the Soviet army liberated the Auschwitz death camp 70 years ago many of the prisoners had been killed or marched away by the retreating Nazis. But among those left were some twin children — the subject of disturbing experiments by Dr. Josef Mengele.





  • The Best Hangover Cure Is An IV Drip In The Back Of A Sketchy Bus
    Descended as I am from a dynasty of problem drinkers, I’ve come to rely on an eclectic stable of hangover remedies. Aleve, starchy breakfast, marijuana, morning sex, a well-spiced michelada or Bloody Mary — all work wonders in tandem with my Anglo-Saxon stoicism. But in late-empire America, there’s always a more expensive solution.



  • Get Cash For Your Undies: A How-To Guide For Enterprising Ladies On The Web
    We asked sellers on Craigslist, Reddit, Twitter, Pantydeal.com (and others) and posted an anonymous online survey, with a total of around 90 respondents. The results, like anything else in the world, depended on what kind of person you are, and the amount of time and effort you were willing to invest. It will not pay off your student loans. But who doesn’t like a little extra cash, right?




  • The Subversive Brilliance Of Marshawn Lynch
    Lynch may be alone in his actions at the moment, but it seems fairly clear that in following the letter of the NFL's law — showing up to the press conference, and verbalizing an answer to a question — he's demonstrating that he, not Roger Goodell or anyone else, controls the conditions of his labor.



  • The Origins Of Life Could Be Buried On The Moon​
    Life probably arose on Earth some 3.5 to 4 billion years ago, but all records of the momentous event have vanished — here on the Blue Marble, at least. Traces of our lost origin story might instead be buried on the Moon.


  • One Step Ahead: Pedophiles On The Deep Web
    Criminals are always one step ahead. While the public can enjoy anonymity tools or hard-drive encryption for privacy and security, people with more nefarious motivations are going to use these technologies to stay undetected, make money, or improve the efficiency of existing criminal enterprises.





  • 'This.' Has People Clamoring For An Invite
    “This” is a social network, This.cm, which allows users to post one link a day, with the intent of sifting through the Internet noise and focusing attention on a standout news article, blog post or podcast.


  • Dying To Be Free
    There’s a treatment for heroin addiction that actually works. Why aren't we using it?



  • Food For Monsters?
    A large number of flowering American plants produce fruits too large or too tough for any native animal to bother with, and botanists have worried about this for years.




  • Why Is My Digital Assistant So Creepy?
    It's hard to say where the craze for a humanized digital assistant came from. Regardless of when the idea was born, today it just seems natural to expect your tech's voice to have a personality, a name, and even some kind of fictional backstory.



  • Your Dog Loves You, It Really Does
    This dog quickly jumped in the lake after it thought its owner was drowning in a heartwarming show of care and compassion. Also: don't fool your dogs like this!!


  • Jessica Williams Will Leave An Interview To Meet Lily Tomlin
    "What’s even more striking about Williams is that she truly is a student of comedy who claims influences as diverse as Gilda Radner (well, sort of) to Cheri Oteri to, yes, Lily Tomlin. But, as an African American woman in late night comedy, she’s aware of the hurdles – she has interesting thoughts on 'SNL' (a show she adores) and the Internet’s initial reaction to her being cast on 'The Daily Show.'"




  • Kickers Keep Getting Better
    Year in and year out, just a little bit at a time, kickers get better. And better. And better. Until the game is completely different, and no one even noticed that kickers were one of the main reasons why.


  • Anthropologists Have Mapped All 61 Tattoos On tzi The Iceman
    Using an innovative non-invasive photographic technique, European researchers have managed to locate and map the extensive set of tattoos on the exquisitely preserved remains of tzi the Iceman. Remarkably, they even found a previously unknown tattoo on his ribcage.


  • Eat The Can(ned Vegetables)
    The king of canned plant products is the canned tomato. Tomatoes are the ideal use case for canning: a product with a very minimal harvest time is picked at its peak and preserved, so I use canned tomatoes ten months a year, happily.



  • How To Hit On Girls In The Club (Or Not)
    Let me get this out of the way: I love both going to the club (dancing and music are great!) and dudes (they're so cute!). But dudes absolutely ruin the club.






  • The Village That Just Got Its First Fridge
    Three-quarters of the world's homes have a fridge — an appliance that can revolutionize a family's life. A tailor in one Indian village has just become the first person in his community to own one — something he has dreamed of for 10 years.



  • The Long, Strange Purgatory Of Casey Kasem
    He was America's most beloved deejay, the unmistakable voice who created 'American top 40' and rose to fame on the schmaltzy but irresistible charm of his "long-distance dedications." all of which makes the tabloid circumstances of his demise — an epic family feud waged in streets, courtrooms, and funeral homes from L.A. to Oslo — even more surreal.



  • What To Do If You're Missing a 1099 Tax Form
    Every year at about this time, freelancers are inundated with Form 1099 so they can report their income to the IRS. But what if one you were expecting never arrives? Forbes' advice: Don't ask for one.





  • The Shrink On The Seattle Seahawks’ Sideline
    For most of the last two seasons, the Seattle Seahawks have been the most physically prepared team in the NFL, a collection of perfectly honed athletes that can outrun and outmuscle opponents at will.The Seahawks’ secret weapon, though, just might be the team’s willingness to give a sports psychologist the freedom to roam the training facility, locker room and even the sidelines every game, to make sure their heads are as sound as their bodies.


  • How ‘Selma’ Got Smeared
    If you want to understand the impossible bind in which the makers of serious historical dramas now find themselves, consider two headlines, both alike in indignity, and both used to bludgeon Ava DuVernay’s film "Selma" for its departures from historical fact.“Not Just a Movie,”columnist Maureen Dowd declared in theNew York Times.“That’s Just Not True,” admonished historian Julian Zelizer in Salon.


  • Life After Debt
    A history of credit cards, late payments, defaults, and living beyond my means.How I got there — and how I’m getting out.


  • Getting Out Of Afghanistan
    By the time we thought about leaving Afghanistan, we’d been tossing gear into the country for more than a decade. This is the story of how we moved out.




  • Georgia Institute of Technology Researchers Bridge the Airgap
    An anonymous reader writes Hacked has a piece about Georgia Institute of Technology researchers keylogging from a distance using the electromagnetic radiation of CPUs. They can reportedly do this from up to 6 meters away. In this video, using two Ubuntu laptops, they demonstrate that keystrokes are easily interpreted with the software they have developed. In their white paper they talk about the need for more research in this area so that hardware and software manufacturers will be able to develop more secure devices. For now, Farraday cages don't seem as crazy as they used to, or do they?







  • Why ATM Bombs May Be Coming Soon To the United States
    HughPickens.com writes Nick Summers has an interesting article at Bloomberg about the epidemic of 90 ATM bombings that has hit Britain since 2013. ATM machines are vulnerable because the strongbox inside an ATM has two essential holes: a small slot in front that spits out bills to customers and a big door in back through which employees load reams of cash in large cassettes. "Criminals have learned to see this simple enclosure as a physics problem," writes Summers. "Gas is pumped in, and when it's detonated, the weakest part—the large hinged door—is forced open. After an ATM blast, thieves force their way into the bank itself, where the now gaping rear of the cash machine is either exposed in the lobby or inside a trivially secured room. Set off with skill, the shock wave leaves the money neatly stacked, sometimes with a whiff of the distinctive acetylene odor of garlic." The rise in gas attacks has created a market opportunity for the companies that construct ATM components. Several manufacturers now make various anti-gas-attack modules: Some absorb shock waves, some detect gas and render it harmless, and some emit sound, fog, or dye to discourage thieves in the act. As far as anyone knows, there has never been a gas attack on an American ATM. The leading theory points to the country's primitive ATM cards. Along with Mongolia, Papua New Guinea, and not many other countries, the U.S. doesn't require its plastic to contain an encryption chip, so stealing cards remains an effective, nonviolent way to get at the cash in an ATM. Encryption chip requirements are coming to the U.S. later this year, though. And given the gas raid's many advantages, it may be only a matter of time until the back of an American ATM comes rocketing off.







  • The Big Bang By Balloon
    StartsWithABang writes If you want to map the entire sky — whether you're looking in the visible, ultraviolet, infrared or microwave, your best bet is to go to space. Only high above the Earth's atmosphere can you map out the entire sky, with your vision unobscured by anything terrestrial. But that costs millions of dollars for the launch alone! What if you've got new technology you want to test? What if you still want to defeat most of the atmosphere? (Which you need to do, for most wavelengths of light.) And what if you want to make observations on large angular scales, something by-and-large impossible from the ground in microwave wavelengths? You launch a balloon! The Spider telescope has just completed its data-taking operations, and is poised to take the next step — beyond Planck and BICEP2 — in understanding the polarization of the cosmic microwave background.







  • Drone Maker Enforces No-Fly Zone Over DC, Hijacking Malware Demonstrated
    An anonymous reader writes A recent incident at the White House showed that small aerial vehicles (drones) present a specific security problem. Rahul Sasi, a security engineer at Citrix R&D, created MalDrone, the first backdoor malware for the AR drone ARM Linux system to target Parrot AR Drones, but says it can be modified to target others as well. The malware can be silently installed on a drone, and be used to control the drone remotely and to conduct remote surveillance. Meanwhile, the Chinese company that created the drone that crashed on the White House grounds has announced a software update for its "Phantom" series that will prohibit flight within 25 kilometers of the capital.







  • Brain Implants Get Brainier
    the_newsbeagle writes "Did my head just beep?" wonders a woman who just received a brain implant to treat her intractable epilepsy. We're entering a cyborg age of medicine, with implanted stimulators that send pulses of electricity into the brain or nervous system to prevent seizures or block pain. The first generation of devices sent out pulses in a constant and invariable rhythm, but device-makers are now inventing smart stimulators that monitor the body for signs of trouble and fire when necessary.







  • One-in-five Developers Now Works On IoT Projects
    dcblogs writes Evans Data Corp., which provides research and intelligence for the software development industry, said that of the estimated 19 million developers worldwide, 19% are now doing IoT-related work. A year ago, the first year IoT-specific data was collected, that figure was 17%. But when developers were asked whether they plan to work in IoT development over the next year, 44% of the respondents said they are planning to do so, said Michael Rasalan, director of research at Evans.







  • Spider Spins Electrically Charged Silk
    sciencehabit writes In their quest to make ultrastrong yet ultrasmall fibers, the polymer industry may soon take a lesson from Uloborus spiders. Uloborids are cribellate spiders, meaning that instead of spinning wet, sticky webs to catch their prey, they produce a fluffy, charged, wool-like silk. A paper published online today in Biology Letters details the process for the first time. It all starts with the silk-producing cribellar gland. In contrast with other spiders, whose silk comes out of the gland intact, scientists were surprised to discover that uloborids' silk is in a liquid state when it surfaces. As the spider yanks the silk from the duct, it solidifies into nanoscale filaments. This "violent hackling" has the effect of stretching and freezing the fibers into shape. It may even be responsible for increasing their strength, because filaments on the nanoscale become stronger as they are stretched. In order to endow the fibers with an electrostatic charge, the spider pulls them over a comblike plate located on its hind legs. The technique is not unlike the so-called hackling of flax stems over a metal brush in order to soften and prepare them for thread-spinning, but in the spider's case it also gives them a charge. The electrostatic fibers are thought to attract prey to the web in the same way a towel pulled from the dryer is able to attract stray socks.







  • Amazon Takes On Microsoft, Google With WorkMail For Businesses
    alphadogg writes Amazon Web Services today launched a new product to its expansive service catalog in the cloud: WorkMail is a hosted email platform for enterprises that could wind up as a replacement for Microsoft and Google messaging systems. The service is expected to cost $4 per user per month for a 50GB email inbox. It's integrated with many of AWS's other cloud services too, including its Zocalo file synchronization and sharing platform. The combination will allow IT shops to set up a hosted email platform and link it to a file sharing system.







  • Snowden Documents: CSE Tracks Millions of Downloads Daily
    Advocatus Diaboli writes Canada's electronic spy agency sifts through millions of videos and documents downloaded online every day by people around the world, as part of a sweeping bid to find extremist plots and suspects, CBC News has learned. Details of the Communications Security Establishment project dubbed 'Levitation' are revealed in a document obtained by U.S. whistleblower Edward Snowden and recently released to CBC News. Under Levitation, analysts with the electronic eavesdropping service can access information on about 10 to 15 million uploads and downloads of files from free websites each day, the document says.







  • Scientists Discover How To Track Natural Errors In DNA Replication
    BarbaraHudson writes Researchers figured out how to label and keep track of new pieces of DNA, and learned to follow the enzyme responsible for copying those pieces. Their research focused on enzymes called polymerases. These enzymes create small regions in DNA that act as scaffolds for the copied DNA. Scientists assumed that the body deletes the scaffolds containing errors, or mutations, and the standard computer models supported this theory. However, the actual research showed that about 1.5 percent of those erroneous scaffolds are left over, trapped within the DNA. After running models, scientists now believe they can track how DNA replicates and find the most likely areas where these scaffolds with errors turn up. The erroneous scaffolds usually appear close to genetic switches, those regions that turn on when genes activate. The mutations damage the switch, which results in genetic disease, as well as increasing the likelihood of cancer.







  • Adobe's Latest Zero-Day Exploit Repurposed, Targeting Adult Websites
    MojoKid writes Adobe issued a patch for bug CVE-2015-0311, one that exposes a user's browser to become vulnerable to code injection, and the now infamous Angler EK (Exploit Kit). To fall victim to this kind of attack, all someone needs to do is visit a website with compromised Flash files, at which point the attacker can inject code and utilize Angler EK, which has proven to be an extremely popular tool over the past year. This particular version of Angler EK is different, however. For starters, it makes use of obfuscated JavaScript and attempts to detect virtual machines and anti-virus products. Its target audience is also rather specific: porn watchers. According to FireEye, which has researched the CVE-2015-0311 vulnerability extensively, this exploit has reached people via banner ads on popular adult websites. It was also noted that even a top 1000 website was affected, so it's not as though victims are surfing to the murkiest depths of the web to come in contact with it.







  • Scientists 3D-Printing Cartilage For Medical Implants
    Molly McHugh writes Scientists and physicians at The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have discovered a way to use MakerBot's 3D-printing technologies to create cartilage and repair tissue damage in the trachea. From the article: "Researchers found that it’s possible to use the MakerBot Replicator 2X Experimental 3D Printer to print what’s called 'scaffolding,' made up of PLA, a bioplastic commonly used in in surgical implant devices. The team customized the printer so that living cells could be printed onto the scaffolding. The 3D-printed mixture of healthy cells found in cartilage, and collagen, eventually grew into the shape of a trachea that could be implanted into a patient."







  • Anonymous No More: Your Coding Style Can Give You Away
    itwbennett writes Researchers from Drexel University, the University of Maryland, the University of Goettingen, and Princeton have developed a "code stylometry" that uses natural language processing and machine learning to determine the authors of source code based on coding style. To test how well their code stylometry works, the researchers gathered publicly available data from Google's Code Jam, an annual programming competition that attracts a wide range of programmers, from students to professionals to hobbyists. Looking at data from 250 coders over multiple years, averaging 630 lines of code per author their code stylometry achieved 95% accuracy in identifying the author of anonymous code. Using a dataset with fewer programmers (30) but more lines of code per person (1,900), the identification accuracy rate reached 97%.







  • Book Review: Designing and Building a Security Operations Center
    benrothke writes Many organizations are overwhelmed by the onslaught of security data from disparate systems, platforms and applications. They have numerous point solutions (anti-virus, firewalls, IDS/IPS, ERP, access control, IdM, single sign-on, etc.) that can create millions of daily log messages. In addition to directed attacks becoming more frequent and sophisticated, there are regulatory compliance issues that place increasing burden on security, systems and network administrators. This creates a large amount of information and log data without a formal mechanism to deal with it. This has led to many organizations creating a security operations center (SOC). A SOC in its most basic form is the centralized team that deals with information security incidents and related issues. In Designing and Building a Security Operations Center, author David Nathans provides the basics on how that can be done. Keep reading for the rest of Ben's review







  • The American App Economy Is Now "Bigger Than Hollywood"
    Lemeowski writes Technology business analyst Horace Deidu found an interesting nugget while closely examining an Apple press release from earlier this year: "The iOS App Store distributed $10 billion to developers in 2014, which, Deidu points out, is just about as much as Hollywood earned off U.S. box office revenues the same year." That means the American app industry is poised to eclipse the American film industry. Additionally, Apple says its App Store has created 627,000 jobs, which Deidu contrasts with the 374,000 jobs Hollywood creates







  • Nobel Laureate and Laser Inventor Charles Townes Passes
    An anonymous reader writes Charles Hard Townes, a professor emeritus of physics at the University of California, Berkeley, who shared the 1964 Nobel Prize in Physics for invention of the laser and subsequently pioneered the use of lasers in astronomy, died early Tuesday in Oakland. He was 99. "Charlie was a cornerstone of the Space Sciences Laboratory for almost 50 years,” said Stuart Bale, director of the lab and a UC Berkeley professor of physics. “He trained a great number of excellent students in experimental astrophysics and pioneered a program to develop interferometry at short wavelengths. He was a truly inspiring man and a nice guy. We’ll miss him.”







  • Graphene: Reversible Method of Magnetic Doping Paves Way For Semiconductor Use
    concertina226 writes: A team of physicists at University of California, Riverside have discovered how to induce magnetism in graphene in a way that still preserves the material's electronic properties, which paves the way for graphene to be used as a semiconductor. The researchers grew a sheet of yttrium iron garnet using laser molecular beam epitaxy in a laboratory (abstract). Magnetic substances like iron are known to disrupt graphene's electrical conduction properties, but yttrium iron garnet works well as it is an electric insulator. When a graphene sheet was placed on top of an atomically smooth sheet of yttrium iron garnet, the graphene borrowed the magnetic properties from the yttrium iron garnet and became magnetized without the need for doping.







  • New Micro-Ring Resonator Creates Quantum Entanglement On a Silicon Chip
    Zothecula writes: The quantum entanglement of particles, such as photons, is a prerequisite for the new and future technologies of quantum computing, telecommunications, and cyber security. Real-world applications that take advantage of this technology, however, will not be fully realized until devices that produce such quantum states leave the realms of the laboratory and are made both small and energy efficient enough to be embedded in electronic equipment. In this vein, European scientists (abstract) have created and installed a tiny "ring-resonator" on a microchip that is claimed to produce copious numbers of entangled photons while using very little power to do so.







  • Why Screen Lockers On X11 Cannot Be Secure
    jones_supa writes: One thing we all remember from Windows NT is the security feature requiring the user to press CTRL-ALT-DEL to unlock the workstation (this can still be enabled with a policy setting). The motivation was to make it impossible for other programs to mimic a lock screen, as they couldn't react to the special key combination. Martin Gräßlin from the KDE team takes a look at the lock screen security on X11. On a protocol level, X11 doesn't know anything of screen lockers. Also the X server doesn't know that the screen is locked as it doesn't understand the concept. This means the screen locker can only use the core functionality available to emulate screen locking. That in turn also means that any other client can do the same and prevent the screen locker from working (for example opening a context menu on any window prevents the screen locker from activating). That's quite a bummer: any process connected to the X server can block the screen locker, and even more it could fake your screen locker.







  • Justice Department: Default Encryption Has Created a 'Zone of Lawlessness'
    Jason Koebler writes: Leslie Caldwell, an assistant attorney general at the Justice Department, said Tuesday that the department is "very concerned" by the Google's and Apple's decision to automatically encrypt all data on Android and iOS devices. "We understand the value of encryption and the importance of security," she said. "But we're very concerned they not lead to the creation of what I would call a 'zone of lawlessness,' where there's evidence that we could have lawful access through a court order that we're prohibited from getting because of a company's technological choices.








  • Strap on fitness finesse: Withings Activit Pop
    Oh, and it tells the time too
    Review One problem with wearable fitness trackers: you may not want to wear one when you’ve also got a watch on. This may be especially the case if, like me, you have a tracker not to monitor an aggressive fitness regime, but simply to ensure you don’t spend the entire working day parked on your arse. And you’d like it to be discreet.…










  • Powering the Internet of Stuff – by sucking electricity from TREES
    Where are my generating wellies?
    Feature Despite regular headlines about self-powered gadgets and a deluge of stories claiming that any day now we should expect our smart phones to start gathering power from the environment around us, the promise of harvested energy always seems just out of reach. Or is it?…


  • Your gran and her cronies are 'embracing online banking' – study
    Really? Even 100-year-olds, claim clipboard wielders
    Online banking has seen a boom among the older generation, with nearly 2.3 million aged between 70 and over 100 years old now using internet banking, according to figures compiled by the British Bankers’ Association (BBA).…






  • Does Big Tech hire white boys ahead of more skilled black people and/or women?
    If it did - opportunity!
    Worstall on Weds (on Thurs) I've been watching with some amusement a little story about Pinterest noting that it's got a user base that leans heavily female. It's doing the rounds as the company thinks, well, it would be nice to be stuffing men full of ads as well (when it actually starts slinging ads) so, umm, why don't we go out and try and find some male customers?…


  • Telstra: we don't collect the metadata the government wants now
    So much for A-G Brandis' 'this'll be easy for telcos to collect' argument
    Yet again, the coaching that spooks and bureaucrats have given Australia's Attorney-General George Brandis has proven to be at odds with the realities of the telecommunications industry.…


  • Windows 10 heralds the MINECRAFT-isation of Microsoft
    Redmond is building a stack of visualisation tools for the generation that grew up with clickable everything
    Until last week, Microsoft’s $2.5 billion purchase of Mojang AB made no sense to me. Undeniably popular in the current generation of kids, at some point, Mojang’s Minecraft will fade, like every other fad before it. Mojang doesn’t even have a follow-up to its breakthrough first title. Back in 2013, Minecraft creator Marcus ‘Notch’ Perrson shelved 0x10C, a space game set in the distant future, leaving Mojang looking like a one hit-wonder.…






  • Trans-Pacific trade treaty close to signoff says USA
    Japan offers America a side of rice, but nasty copyright provisions remain
    The US Trade Representative Michael Froman has tried to reassure the country's lawmakers that the interminable negotiations over the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) will conclude during 2015.…


  • Cisco says GHOST is more Casper than Sleepy Hollow
    Borg exorcised GHOST years ago when it sent IPv4 to the nether realms
    Cisco has put forward at least a partial response to 2015's first branded bug, GHOST, saying that in The Borg's world, the glibc vulnerability is probably of relatively low severity.…


  • Researcher says Aussie spooks help code Five Eyes mega malware
    QWERTY keylogger code alleged to name Defence Signals Directorate
    The Australian Signals Directorate (ASD) has refused to comment on allegations it had a hand in the creation of a keylogging module used by global spookhauses and considered almost identical to parts of the complex Regin malware.…


  • FCC will vote to cut off 41 million broadband users this Thursday*
    * This headline brought to you by the cable companies
    US internet tinkerer the FCC will likely vote tomorrow to change its definition of "broadband" connections from 4Mbps to 25Mbps – effectively moving 13 per cent of the American population outside the envelope of "fast" internet access.…



  • Facebook's mobile ad bonanza brought it record returns in 2014
    Social network Zucked up more cash than ever
    Facebook finished the best quarter and the best year of its history on December 31, with its latest earnings report showing record annual revenues of $12.47bn for its fiscal 2014, up 58 per cent from 2013's haul.…




  • Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 CPU dumped from flagship smartphone
    While China woes rumble on: Watchdog on one hand, deadbeat partners on the other
    Qualcomm reported record revenues for the first quarter of its fiscal 2015 on Wednesday, but the mobile chipmaker warned investors that it's still struggling to make headway in the all-important China market.…













  • Veritas is home. Symantec’s storage split-off adopts old name
    Moniker re-emergence the final unravelling of a doomed deal
    Bisecting Symantec has decided after much deliberation the Veritas brand - the one it torched years ago - will be the monicker for the Information Management business when it splits from the mothership.…




  • GoDaddy in doghouse over puppy-flogging Super Bowl ad
    Domain giant: You'll still see us in the Big Game
    Domain registrar, web hosting company and now seemingly heartless facilitator of dog trading GoDaddy has pulled a Super Bowl ad depicting the sale of a puppy online, following a string of complaints that it might lead to mass dog farming.…


  • Scouts take down database due to 'security vulnerabilities'
    Full security audit for Compass database
    The Scouts Association has taken down its Compass database, which holds the records of nearly half-a-million young people and adult volunteers, after discovering a "potential security vulnerability," The Register can reveal.…


  • Spinning rust into gold: WD profit grows ... though sales dip
    Rival Seagate being outsold by Milligan’s Mob
    +Comment Western Digital sold 61 million drives in its latest quarter, 2.1 million less than a year ago, but made $30m more profit, and it out-shipped and out-earned rival Seagate – CEO Steve Milligan's men must have ear-to-ear grins on their faces.…


  • I ain't afraid of no GHOST – securo-bods
    Serious – but it's no Heartbleed
    The latest high-profile security vulnerability affecting Linux systems is serious but nowhere near as bad as the infamous Heartbleed flaw, according to security experts.…


Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM