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  • Pi Glove interview
    I was invited to the second Picademy back in July. The first day was workshops, education, and the second day was a pure hack day, and we had a bit of a chat with Eben [Upton] and some other people who wanted to support and build something. We wanted to come up with something you could physically use, and we decided to use Scratch GPIO.



  • Red Hat OpenShift Commons Opens Up PaaS Conversations
    Ashesh Badani, vice president and general manager of OpenShift at Red Hat told ServerWatch that the key Red Hatidea behind OpenShift Commons is to enable open and transparent discussion.Red Hat's OpenShift platform is already available in three deployment models including OpenShift Online, OpenShift Enterprise and the OpenShift Origin open-source project. Participants in the OpenShift Commons include Accenture, Cisco, Cloudera, Hortonworks, CA and Orange among others.




  • Xfce 4.12 announcement
    "Today, after 2 years and 10 months of work, we are pleased to announcethe release of the Xfce desktop 4.12, a new stable version thatsupersedes Xfce 4.10."


  • Kubuntu 15.04 Beta 1 Screenshot Tour
    We are preparing Kubuntu Vivid Vervet (15.04) for distribution on April 23rd, 2015. With this Beta 1 pre-release, you can see what we are trying out in preparation for our next (stable) version. We have some interesting things happening, so read on for highlights and information.



  • Ubuntu Touch Is Being Ported for OnePlus One Phones
    Canonical published its Ubuntu Porting Guide just a week ago and it will help developers bring the operating system to other devices than just Nexus 4 and BQ's Aquaris, but it looks like an Ubuntu Touch for OnePlus One porting project was started well before that.


  • Quirky 7.0 Screenshot Tour
    I created Puppy Linux back in 2003, but there was never a toolchain for compiling Puppy completely from source. Instead, Puppy is built from binary packages of another distro, plus PET packages compiled natively. We did use the T2 system right back at Puppy v2. In early 2015, I tackled the formidable task of compiling everything in T2, and I had to introduce 105 new packages into T2. It took a couple of months, but I eventually was able to compile every package required for Quirky.




  • Xfce 4.12 Has Been Officially Released
    After two years of hard work, the Xfce development team had the pleasure of announcing a few minutes ago, February 28, the immediate and general availability of the highly anticipated Xfce 4.12 desktop environment for GNU/Linux distributions.


  • Pocket-watch style smartphone runs Firefox OS
    Monohm unveiled a disk-shaped “Runcible” smartphone running Firefox OS. The camera-equipped device is notable for its chilled-out UI and modular construction. The Runcible will launch in the second half of the year through Japanese carrier KDDI, which has invested in Berkeley, Calif. startup Monohm, Inc. The company name combines the Japanese word “mono” or “object,” […]





  • Net Neutrality Clears Hurdle & Other Things
    Was that former Linux Outlaw Dan Lynch on FLOSS Weekly 326 earlier this week? It most certainly was. Dan joins regular host Randall Schwartz in talking about the Open Source Initiative with Simon Phipps and Patrick Masson in this particular episode, which is well worth a watch. It’s always great to see Randall on his show, and it’s great that he has such fantastic “guest help” from time to time.


  • Ubuntu Kylin 15.04 Makes It Easier for Windows Users to Adapt to the Unity Interface
    The Ubuntu Kylin 15.04 Beta 1 (Vivid Vervet) operating system has also been released alongside the Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME, and Ubuntu MATE distributions, bringing a wide range of improvements, numerous updated components, as well as the usual bug fixes. We took the distribution for a test drive and created a nice screenshot tour for all users of the Chinese Ubuntu community.


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  • America’s First Drug Dealer
    Arnold Rothstein was so egotistical he actually invited journalists to write about him — and he was so powerful he didn’t worry about the police reading it. He owned them.




  • Does The Sun Have A Heart Of Dark Matter?
    ​Something is amiss in our Sun. Or, rather, something is amiss in our theories of what the Sun is and how it behaves — theories that are known collectively as the standard solar model.












  • Google Wants To Rank Websites Based On Facts Not Links
    The internet is stuffed with garbage. Anti-vaccination websites make the front page of Google, and fact-free "news" stories spread like wildfire. Google has devised a fix — rank websites according to their truthfulness.






  • Shoveling A Path Out Of Prison
    If states want to dig themselves out from the difficulties of mass incarceration, they can begin by creating employment programs for newly released inmates.







  • A Cure For Colorblindess
    Colorblindness is just the latest problem that scientists have tried to solve with a technical fix.


  • Work, Play And Anthony Mason
    Anthony Mason, who was recently very sick but happily making progress, was not the best player on the Knicks, but he was its purest manifestation.



  • Outside Man
    Scott Budnick produced the Hangover movies. He’s also one of the most effective advocates for prison reform in California. It doesn’t make any sense until you see him at work.




  • Why Are Albums Released On Tuesday?
    The recent news about the music industry adopting Friday as the global release day for new albums has prompted many questions. One of those is: Why are albums released on Tuesday in the U.S.?





  • The Cop Who Loved Champagne
    Jack Maple was a New York City cop with champagne taste and a beer wallet. When he fell for the swank charms of the Plaza Hotel, his life began to unravel.


  • The Russia That Died With Boris Nemtsov
    Under President Boris Nemtsov, Russia could have been a country where I could have kept living and working. With his death, that unrealized future has died, too.



  • A Psychedelic Murder Story
    Did ayahuasca tea — brewed from rainforest plants and revered by many Brazilians as holy — contribute to the brutal death of a celebrated Brazilian artist?



  • Thanks For The Net Neutrality, Oligarchs
    "Net neutrality" will be the law of the land following the Federal Communications Commission's vote to reclassify broadband Internet services as public utilities. Please take some time this week to thank the outspoken citizens who made this possible. These heroes of the open Internet are regular folk, just like you and me, with names like Microsoft, eBay, Facebook, Google and Amazon.


  • How To Remember People’s Names
    If you are the name-forgetting type, you probably spend a fair amount of time feeling unmoored in a sea of vaguely familiar faces. Indira Pun does not have this problem.




  • The Sisterhood Of The Student Midwives
    At a pint-sized school in a tiny Maine town, strangers break the ice and prepare to build bonds with expectant mothers by practicing pelvic exams and experiencing other ordinarily awkward encounters with each other.


  • 'Sports Analytics' Is Bullshit Now
    At this weekend's 9th annual MIT Sloan Sports Analytics there will be talk about the exciting future of sports analytics, there will also be talk about how it's all bullshit.



  • The Elastic Brain
    A child’s brain can master anything from language to music. Can neuroscience extend that genius across the lifespan?


  • Rest In Peace, Mr. Spock
    The ideals that Spock embodied — that logic can point the way to morality, that evidence is the basis for truth, that curiosity matters more than dogma — were powerful influences that resonate even as the show’s hackneyed plots and on-the-cheap special effects have come to feel dated. They’re also among the principles that underpin this website.



  • Oregon Considers Banning Most Vaccine Exemptions
    If the bill passes, Oregon would join Mississippi and West Virginia as the only states allowing exemptions solely for medical reasons, and no longer for religious, philosophical or personal reasons. Washington, California, and Vermont are considering similar bills that remove either the personal, religious or philosophical exemptions.







  • What Kind Of Man Joins The Men's Rights Movement?
    There's a growing army of pissed-off activists who are convinced that the male species is profoundly endangered by our feminized society. They say it's a woman's world now — that women have the upper hand in sex, in universities, in custody battles. And don't even get them started on all those bogus rape cases. It's enough to make a certain kind of man join a revolution.


  • ISIS Threatens Life of Twitter Founder After Thousands of Account Suspensions
    Patrick O'Neill writes After a wave of account bannings that marks Twitter's most aggressive move ever against ISIS, new images circulated from militants shows founder Jack Dorsey in crosshairs with the caption "Twitter, you started this war." The famously tech-savy ISIS has met a number of defeats on American-built social media recently with sites like Twitter and YouTube banning the group's efforts in unprecedented numbers.







  • How Do You Handle the Discovery of a Web Site Disclosing Private Data?
    An anonymous reader writes I recently discovered that a partner web site of a financial institution I do business with makes it trivially easy to view documents that do not belong to me. As in, change the document ID in a URL and view someone else's financial documents. This requires no authentication, only a document URL. (Think along the lines of an online rebate center where you upload documents including credit card statements.) I immediately called customer service and spoke with a perplexed agent who unsurprisingly didn't know what to do with my call. I asked to speak with a supervisor who took good notes and promised a follow-up internally. I asked for a return call but have not yet heard back. In the meantime, I still have private financial information I consider to be publicly available. I'm trying to be responsible and patient in my handling of this, but I am second guessing how to move forward if not quickly resolved. So, Slashdot, how would you handle this situation?







  • Ikea Unveils Furniture That Charges Your Smartphone Wirelessly
    pbahra writes Swedish furniture maker Ikea unveiled a new range of furniture that it says can wirelessly charge some mobile devices. The Swedish furniture giant made the announcement on Sunday at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. Ikea's introduction of wireless charging functionality on some of its new furniture heats up the battle for a global wireless charging standard, of which there are currently three, all struggling to become the global leader.







  • Google Wants To Rank Websites Based On Facts Not Links
    wabrandsma writes about Google's new system for ranking the truthfulness of a webpage. "Google's search engine currently uses the number of incoming links to a web page as a proxy for quality, determining where it appears in search results. So pages that many other sites link to are ranked higher. This system has brought us the search engine as we know it today, but the downside is that websites full of misinformation can rise up the rankings, if enough people link to them. Google research team is adapting that model to measure the trustworthiness of a page, rather than its reputation across the web. Instead of counting incoming links, the system – which is not yet live – counts the number of incorrect facts within a page. 'A source that has few false facts is considered to be trustworthy,' says the team. The score they compute for each page is its Knowledge-Based Trust score. The software works by tapping into the Knowledge Vault, the vast store of facts that Google has pulled off the internet. Facts the web unanimously agrees on are considered a reasonable proxy for truth. Web pages that contain contradictory information are bumped down the rankings."







  • Samsung Officially Unpacks Galaxy S6 and Galaxy S6 Edge At MWC
    MojoKid writes Today, at Mobile World Congress, Samsung took the veil off of its much-anticipated Galaxy S6, and also the Galaxy S6 edge. As has been heavily rumored, the S6 foregoes the plastic shell of its predecessor and integrates metal and glass instead, resulting in a far more premium feel, a thickness of 6.8mm, and a weight of 138g on the normal S6 and 132g on the edge. Samsung made it a point to mention that the metal it uses in the S6 is 50% stronger than other smartphones- a Apple bendgate jab, perhaps? Both the S6 and S6 edge share the same hardware, which includes a 5.1-inch Quad HD Super AMOLED display. That gives us a resolution of 2560x1440, and a high pixel density of 577 ppi. The new phones also include an octa-core processor (2.1GHz quad + 1.5GHz quad), 3GB of DDR4 memory, and LTE cat 6 (300/50Mbps) support. Also of note is the phone's rear 16 megapixel f/1.9 camera, which Samsung says will launch in less than a second (0.6 seconds, to be exact). The front camera is no slouch either, also boasting an aperture of f/1.9, and coming in at 5 megapixels. The company says that the phone can add 4 hours of battery-life after a mere 10 minutes of charging, and when compared to the iPhone, it charges up to full in half the time. The S6 also has built-in wireless charging as well.







  • Ultra-Low Power Radio Transceiver Enables Truly Wireless Earbuds
    First time accepted submitter irl_4795 writes At Mobile World Congress in Barcelona NXP Semiconductors will demonstrate Near Field Magnetic Induction technology in a truly wireless earbud including wireless audio streaming from ear to ear. From the article: "The wireless technology being used to enable truly wireless earbuds is based on Near Field Magnetic Induction (NFMI). NFMI features important properties such as ultra-low power consumption and the ability to create a very reliable network in and around the human body, with both high-quality audio and data streaming supported over small distances. An additional integration advantage is also that it requires few external components. NFMI is a short range technology and as such also creates a private network, making it is much less susceptible to interference than 2.4 GHz transceivers.







  • 20-Year-Old Military Weather Satellite Explodes In Orbit
    schwit1 writes A 20-year-old U.S. military weather satellite apparently exploded for no obvious reason. The incident has put several dozen pieces of space junk into orbit. From the article: "A 20-year-old military weather satellite apparently exploded in orbit Feb. 3 following what the U.S. Air Force described as a sudden temperature spike. The “catastrophic event” produced 43 pieces of space debris, according to Air Force Space Command, which disclosed the loss of the satellite Feb. 27 in response to questions from SpaceNews. The satellite, Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Flight 13, was the oldest continuously operational satellite in the DMSP weather constellation."







  • Ultra-Low Power Radio Transceiver Enables Truly Wireless Earbuds
    First time accepted submitter irl_4795 (4020741) writes At the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona NXP Semiconductors will demonstrate Near Field Magnetic Induction technology in a truly wireless earbud including wireless audio streaming from ear to ear. From the article: "The wireless technology being used to enable truly wireless earbuds is based on Near Field Magnetic Induction (NFMI). NFMI features important properties such as ultra-low power consumption and the ability to create a very reliable network in and around the human body, with both high-quality audio and data streaming supported over small distances. An additional integration advantage is also that it requires few external components. NFMI is a short range technology and as such also creates a private network, making it is much less susceptible to interference than 2.4 GHz transceivers.







  • Spacewalking Astronauts Finish Extensive, Tricky Cable Job
    An anonymous reader writes news about a three-day cable job completed outside the International Space Station. "Spacewalking astronauts successfully completed a three-day cable job outside the International Space Station on Sunday, routing several-hundred feet of power and data lines for new crew capsules commissioned by NASA. It was the third spacewalk in just over a week for Americans Terry Virts and Butch Wilmore, and the quickest succession of spacewalks since NASA's former shuttle days. The advance work was needed for the manned spacecraft under development by Boeing and SpaceX. A pair of docking ports will fly up later this year, followed by the capsules themselves, with astronauts aboard, in 2017."







  • Physicists May Be One Step Closer To Explaining High-Temp Superconductivity
    sciencehabit writes For years some physicists have been hoping to crack the mystery of high-temperature superconductivity—the ability of some complex materials to carry electricity without resistance at temperatures high above absolute zero—by simulating crystals with patterns of laser light and individual atoms. Now, a team has taken—almost—the next-to-last step in such 'optical lattice' simulation by reproducing the pattern of magnetism seen in high-temperature superconductors from which the resistance-free flow of electricity emerges.







  • Pharming Attack Targets Home Router DNS Settings
    msm1267 (2804139) writes Pharming attacks are generally network-based intrusions where the ultimate goal is to redirect a victim's web traffic to a hacker-controlled webserver, usually through a malicious modification of DNS settings. Some of these attacks, however, are starting to move to the web and have their beginnings with a spam or phishing email. Proofpoint reported on the latest iteration of this attack, based in Brazil. The campaign was carried out during a five-week period starting in December when Proofpoint spotted phishing messages, fewer than 100, sent to customers of one of the country's largest telecommunications companies.







  • Research Suggests That Saunas Help You Live Longer
    jones_supa writes A study of Finnish men suggests that frequent sauna baths may help you live longer. Previous research has suggested that saunas might improve blood vessel function and exercise capacity, or even lower blood pressure in patients with hypertension. The new study links long, hot sauna baths with more benefits, including fewer deaths from heart attacks, strokes, various heart-related conditions and other causes. The study tracked 2315 Finnish men for nearly 20 years on average. Most participants used saunas at least once weekly. Those who used them four to seven times weekly received the greatest benefits. The study published in JAMA Internal Medicine wraps up by saying that further studies are warranted to establish the potential mechanism that links sauna bathing and the aforementioned cardiovascular benefits.







  • 42 Artificial Intelligences Are Going Head To Head In "Civilization V"
    rossgneumann writes The r/Civ subreddit is currently hosting a fascinating "Battle Royale" in the strategy game Civilization V, pitting 42 of the game's built-in, computer-controlled players against each other for world domination. The match is being played on the largest Earth-shaped map the game is capable of, with both civilizations that were included in the retail version of the game and custom, player-created civilizations that were modded into it after release.







  • Craig Brittain (Revenge Porn King) Sues For Use of Image
    retroworks writes "Washington Post reporter Caitlin Dewey leads with, "Revenge-porn impresario Craig Brittain is learning the hard way that karma is a real witch." The report states that the Federal Trade Commission has settled a complaint against Brittain, whose defunct site, "Is Anybody Down" was accused of unfair business practices. From the article: "The site paid its bills by soliciting women's nude photos on Craigslist and/or from their exes, publishing the photos without the women's permission (and often with their names and phone numbers attached), and then charging fees of $200 to $500 to take the photos down." Brittain agreed to destroy the image and never operate a revenge porn site again. However, On Feb. 9, "Brittain filed a takedown request to Google, demanding that the search engine stop linking to nearly two dozen URLs — including a number of news articles, and files on the case from the FTC — because they used photos of him and information about him without his permission." Ars Technica explains. "In this instance, fair use and general First Amendment principles are on Google's and the media's side."







  • Xfce 4.12 Released
    motang writes: After two years of hard work (and much to the dismay of naysayers who worried the project has been abandoned), the Xfce team has announced the release of Xfce 4.12. Highlights include improvements to the window switcher dialog, intelligent hiding of the panel, new wallpaper settings, better multi-monitor support, improved power settings, additions to the file manager, and a revamped task manager. Here is a quick tour, the full changelog, and the download page. I have been running it since Xubuntu 15.04 beta 1 was released two days ago. It is much improved over 4.10, and the new additions are great."







  • Ask Slashdot: How Does One Verify Hard Drive Firmware?
    An anonymous reader writes: In light of recent revelations from Kaspersky Labs about the Equation Group and persistent hard drive malware, I was curious about how easy it might be to verify my own system's drives to see if they were infected. I have no real reason to think they would be, but I was dismayed by the total lack of tools to independently verify such a thing. For instance, Seagate's firmware download pages provide files with no external hash, something Linux distributions do for all of their packages. Neither do they seem to provide a utility to read off the current firmware from a drive and verify its integrity. Are there any utilities to do such a thing? Why don't these companies provide verification software to users? Has anyone compiled and posted a public list of known-good firmware hashes for the major hard drive vendors and models? This seems to be a critical hole in PC security. I did contact Seagate support asking for hashes of their latest firmware; I got a response stating, "...If you download the firmware directly from our website there is no risk on the file be tampered with." (Their phrasing, not mine.) Methinks somebody hasn't been keeping up with world events lately.







  • Genetic Data Analysis Tools Reveal How US Pop Music Evolved
    KentuckyFC writes: The history of pop music is rich in anecdotes, folklore and controversy. But despite the keen interest, there is little in the form of hard evidence to back up most claims about the evolution of music. Now a group of researchers have used data analysis tools developed for genomic number crunching to study the evolution of U.S. pop music. The team studied 30-second segments of more than 17,000 songs that appeared on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 between 1960 and 2010. Their tools categorized the songs according to harmonic features such as chord changes as well as the quality of timbre such as whether guitar-based, piano-based orchestra-based and so on. They then used a standard algorithm for discovering clusters within networks of data to group the songs into 13 different types, which turned out to correspond with well known genres such as rap, rock, country and so on. Finally, they plotted the change in popularity of these musical types over time. The results show a clear decline in the popularity of jazz and blues since 1960. During the same period, rock-related music has ebbed and flowed in popularity. By contrast, rap was rare before 1980 before becoming the dominant musical style for 30 years until declining in the late 2000s. The work answers several important question about the evolution of pop music, such as whether music industry practices have led to a decline in the cultural variety of new music, and whether British bands such as The Beatles and The Rolling Stones triggered the 1964 American music revolution [spoiler: no in both cases].







  • Foxconn Factories' Future: Fewer Humans, More Robots
    jfruh writes: Foxconn, which supplies much of Apple's manufacturing muscle and has been criticized for various labor sins, is now moving to hire employees who won't complain because they're robots. The company expects 70 percent of its assembly line work to be robot-driven within three years.







  • Uber Discloses Database Breach, Targets GitHub With Subpoena
    New submitter SwampApe tips news that Uber has revealed a database breach from 2014. The company says the database contained names and diver's license numbers of their drivers, about 50,000 of which were accessed by an unauthorized third party. As part of their investigation into who was behind the breach, Uber has filed a lawsuit which includes a subpoena request for GitHub. "Uber's security team knows the public IP address used by the database invader, and wants to link that number against the IP addresses and usernames of anyone who looked at the GitHub-hosted gist in question – ID 9556255 – which we note today no longer exists. It's possible the gist contained a leaked login key, or internal source code that contained a key that should not have been made public."







  • Oracle Sues 5 Oregon Officials For 'Improper Influence'
    SpzToid writes: Following up on an earlier Slashdot story, the Oracle Corporation has filed a rather timely suit against five of former governor John Kitzhaber's staff for their "improper influence" in the decision to shutter the Cover Oregon healthcare website, while blaming Oracle to defuse the political consequences. Oracle argues the website was ready to go before the state decided to switch to the federal exchange in April. "The work on the exchange was complete by February 2014, but going live with the website and providing a means for all Oregonians to sign up for health insurance coverage didn't match the former-Governor's re-election strategy to 'go after' Oracle," Oracle spokeswoman Deborah Hellinger said in a statement. Kitzhaber resigned last week amid criminal probes into an influence-peddling scandal involving allegations that his fiancée used her position in his office for personal gain.







  • Citrix targets carriers with NetScaler
    Virtualising the mobile network for the NFV world
    Mobile World Congress Citrix is taking a leap into carrier-grade network function virtualisation (NFV) with a new release of its NetScaler platform.…



  • Microsoft Swarms all over Docker Machines
    Embrace, extend, hmm, what's that last one?
    Microsoft has expanded its cloudy support for Docker, adding Docker Machine to Azure and Hyper-V, and supporting Docker Swarm.…


  • Blockheads bork Bitcoin Foundation board election
    As if anything could go wrong with version 0.1 blockchain voteware ...
    Those with doubts about Bitcoin's viability have some new ammunition, after the Bitcoin Foundation fluffed a board election it tried to run using its own technology.…



  • Seagate NAS owners: hide it behind a firewall. Fast.
    Unpatched software in the OS means root to your stuff won't be hard, says researcher
    An Australian security researcher says a bunch of Seagate NAS devices carry serious vulnerabilities and should be kept away from the Internet.…




  • Turnbull's model e-gov service is HIPSTER SHAMBLES
    UK Government Digital Service used as model for Australia's Digital Transformation office has made big mistakes
    Australia's communications minister Malcolm Turnbull has often expressed his admiration for the United Kingdom's Government Digital Service (GDS), going so far to say as to say it is the model and/or inspiration for the recently-revealed Digital Transformation Office (DTO).…


  • SKINNY Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge keep Samsung on the edge
    A built-in battery? Is your name Apple?
    MWC The grandeur of today's Samsung S6 phabbagasm in Barcelona reminded your correspondent of the scene in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy when the day dawned for the announcement of the Answer: the answer to life the universe and everything. The answer the galaxy had been waiting for, for 10,000 years.…




  • Out of time: Huawei, LG unveil watches nobody wants to buy
    Can I borrow your charger?
    MWC China’s Huawei and South Korea’s LG showed off new watches in Barcelona today. The “smartwatch” is a misnomer: both will stop telling the time after a day, unless they are charged. Then they can tell you the time for another day.…


  • HTC One M9 hands on: Like a smart M8 in a sharp suit
    If it ain't broke, just polish it gently
    MWC HTC's One is like a tasteful band that has been the critics' choice for years but never quite breaks through from cult status to superstardom. It's by far the classiest thing on the market – but its distinctiveness and craftmanship hasn't been rewarded by runaway success.…


  • BOOM! MediaTek parks tanks on Qualcomm's lawn
    Boasts big HTC win, and streaming tech
    MWC This time last year MediaTek was still smarting about sniffy comments made by Qualcomm. "You can’t take eight lawnmower engines, put them together and now claim you have an eight-cylinder Ferrari," Qualcomm's senior VP Anand Chandrasekher had said, referring to MediaTek’s 610 and 615 eight core smartphone chips.…





  • Hadoop gets native C/C++ injection
    Big data for the non-Java generation
    Like Hadoop but it’s just a bit too Javary? There’s now an answer for that: MapReduce for C (MR4C).…


  • Telly behemoths: Does size matter?
    And in Blighty, does class matter even more?
    Feature This month, the fabulously wealthy owners of houses with curved walls will be delighted to know that the world's largest curved TV arrives at the Knightsbridge tat-palace Harrods. With a 105-inch screen, LG's new set, the snappily named 105UC9V boasts a 21:9 aspect ratio, and all the latest technology.…


  • C'mon! Greece isn't really bust and it can pay its debts
    Not that anyone will be willing to admit it
    Worstall @ the Weekend As I write we've just got the latest news that Greece has been saved from default, bankruptcy, being thrown out of the euro and everything is going to be lovely for The Men Without Ties. Which is, of course, lovely, but there really wasn't quite as much to worry about as people seemed to think.…


  • Ikea to start making electrified furniture. What could go wrong?
    It's even mulling apps for tables and chairs
    MWC Ikea, having successfully branded Sweden as a country associated with family disputes and cupboards with wonky doors, has now taken on the challenge of improving how we all live through Qi wireless charging technology.…










  • Murky online paedo retreat: The Nether explores the fantasy-reality divide
    The things that dreams are made of
    Theatre Review On a bare stage, two chairs face each other across a table. At the table sits Morris, an investigating detective employed by The Nether – the virtual counterpart to the In-World – where users in the year 2050 can live out their every fantasy. Opposite sits her quarry, Sims, a businessman in his 60s who has been up to no good. His crime: he has created a virtual space, or “realm”, that breaks the rules.…


  • So You've Been Publicly Shamed, Style and The Buried Giant
    Jon Ronson, Joseph Connolly and Kazuo Ishiguro, hot off the press
    Page File El Reg bookworm Mark Diston leafs his way through three forthcoming releases. Remains of the Day author Kazuo Ishiguro's first book in a decade takes us on a mythical journey. Jon Ronson engages in a journey of his own having been victim of a social networking stunt. And Joseph Connolly entertains with his tale of guilty pleasures and domestic obsessions.…



  • I, ROBOT ~ YOU, MORON. How else will automated news work?
    Comment is free (but I’m charging for this)
    Something for the Weekend, Sir? They want to replace me with a robot. This is an excellent idea. In a world of unlimited connected information, it’s about time that the middleman stopped getting in the way. Things happen, facts materialise, they end up online, then you read them. Simple, really. What’s a journalist for?…



  • New Xen vuln triggers Amazon, Rackspace reboot panic redux
    Second hypervisor-related cloud meltdown in six months
    Newly discovered vulnerabilities in the open source Xen virtualization hypervisor have once again sent major public cloud companies scurrying to patch and reboot their systems before attackers can pull off a massive exploit.…




  • Make room, Wi-Fi, Qualcomm wants to run LTE on your 5GHz band
    Low-power LTE-U can share spectrum with 802.11
    Qualcomm says it will begin shipping new chips later this year that will help relieve mobile network congestion by routing LTE mobile broadband traffic over short-range, unlicensed radio frequency bands.…



  • RIP Leonard Nimoy: He lived long and prospered
    We are, and always shall be, his fans
    Obit Leonard Nimoy, the actor who became the most recognized face of the Star Trek franchise, has died at his home in Los Angeles at the age of 83.…




  • GAMIFY your FRIDAY with our Public Sector Innovation Bingo!
    This is an agile process, meaning... er, whatever we want it to mean
    Bored with another grey Friday? Here is a game for two players. The exercise allows you to keep up to date with vital subsidy-seeking buzzwords – while retaining the vital element of "fun".…



  • Lenovo: We SWEAR we're done with bloatware, adware and scumware
    By Windows 10 launch our systems will be PURE, honest
    Barely a week after the breaking of the Superfish scandal, Lenovo has done a complete reverse ferret on bloatware - promising that by the time Windows 10 comes out its systems will be as pure as they can be.…


  • BP: Oil prices crashed, so must our ICT budget
    Sources say suppliers to be squeezed to help save biz $300m
    BP has confirmed it is looking to squeeze costs from its annual ICT budget on the back of crashing oil prices, and well-placed sources tell us the business wants to identify $300m in savings.…


  • SCC bags universal credit hosting contract
    DWP chucks more money at car crash of a programme
    Reseller and IT services outfit SCC has won a two-year hosting deal for the Department for Work and Pensions' (DWP) troubled universal credit programme for a sum worth "over six figures".…



  • Nimble revenue diet gets fibre supplement
    Losses are lessening, but can it get the result it wants
    IPOed hybrid array market star Nimble Storage beat the street with fourth-quarter revenues of $68.3m, and lost less money than last quarter as Fibre Channel sales kicked in. Can it keep on like this?…


Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM