Recent Changes - Search:
NTLUG

Linux is free.
Life is good.

Linux Training
10am on Meeting Days!

1825 Monetary Lane Suite #104 Carrollton, TX

Do a presentation at NTLUG.

What is the Linux Installation Project?

Real companies using Linux!

Not just for business anymore.

Providing ready to run platforms on Linux

Show Descriptions... (Show All) (Single Column)










  • Red Hat: 2016:1664-01: kernel: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for kernel is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact of Important. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2016:1657-01: kernel: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for kernel is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.1 Extended Update Support. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2016:1654-01: qemu-kvm-rhev: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for qemu-kvm-rhev is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 6.0 (Juno) for RHEL 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact [More...]





  • Julita Inca Chiroque: How Do You Fedora?
    We recently interviewed Julita Inca Chiroque on how he uses Fedora. This is part of a series on the Fedora Magazine. The series profiles Fedora users and how they use Fedora to get things done.





  • ConnochaetOS 14.2 Screenshot Tour
    I am proudly announcing ConnochaetOS 14.2, based on Slackware and Salix 14.2. As always it contains only free/libre software as defined by the Free Software Foundation (FSF). We are now using our own deblobbed Linux kernel, named 'kernel-free' based on the de-blobbing mechanism done by Debian GNU/Linux. ConnochaetOS contains: The de-blobbed Kernel Linux 4.4.19, IceWM 1.3.12, Iceweasel 45.3.0. In our slack-n-free repo we provide the current versions of Iceape and Icedove, the brand-new qt5-webengine based web browsers Qupzilla and Otter-browser and LibreOffice 5.1.4 as provided by Eric 'Alien' Hameleers.


  • Emma A LightWeight Database Management Tool For Linux
    Today who does not interact with databases and if you're a programmer then the database management is your daily task. For database management, there is a very popular tool called, MySQL Workbench. It's a tool that ships with tonnes of functionalities. But not all of us as beginner programmers use all Workbench features. So here we also have a very lightweight database manager in Linux, Emma.



  • SFC's Kuhn in firing line as Linus Torvalds takes aim
    A few days after he mused that there had been no reason for him to blow his stack recently, Linux creator Linus Torvalds has directed a blast at the Software Freedom Conservancy and its distinguished technologist Bradley Kuhn over the question of enforcing compliance of the GNU General Public Licence.


  • Facebook's computer vision tool, Linux at 25, and more news
    In this week's edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at Facebook releasing more open source code, examining the success of Linux on its 25th birthday, Uganda's government moving to embrace open source, and more.Open source news roundup for August 21-27, 2016read more


  • Vale, LOGO creator Seymour Papert, who taught us that code can be creative play
    Arduino-fiddling kids, and the rest of us, owe Papert a debt of gratitudeBack when dinosaurs ruled the Earth and I was a kid, I received the gift of a "100-in-1 Electronics Kit" that taught me the basics of electrical circuit design as I strung pre-cut wires between springy posts. At the very centre of this kit - its beating heart - a single transistor could be wired to work in an amplifier, or AM radio, or tone generator.…




  • KaOS Brings Serious Relevance Back to KDE
    I have to confess, KDE has never succeeded in winning me over. During its 3.x days, I found it too much like Windows. When it finally shifted to the next iteration (4.x, aka Plasma), I thought the new additions were interesting, but, as a whole, the platform suffered from serious stability issues. I also gave 5 a try a few times and found it buggy and slow.



  • Rugged 3.5-inch SBC runs Linux or Android on i.MX6
    Logic Supply has introduced a “ICM-3011” 3.5-inch board with a dual-core i.MX6, wide-range power input, and extended temperature operation. Like the recent Pico-ITX form factor ICM-2010 SBC that’s also available in an ICS-2010 mini-PC, the ICM-3011 was built by Taipei-based Embux, and is being distributed and supported by Logic Supply.




Error: It's not possible to reach RSS file http://www.newsforge.com/index.rss ...

  • Russia's Most Powerful Weapon Is The Spread Of Lies
    The Soviet Union devoted considerable resources to spreading false stories. But now disinformation is regarded as an important aspect of Russian military doctrine, and it's disseminated with far greater sophistication and volume than ever before.


  • Millennials Are Ruining Vacation, And Other Facts
    Welcome to What We Learned This Week, a digest of the most curiously important facts from the past few days. This week: Young people hate vacation, Google search is sometimes bad and paper can cut wood.






  • The Scariest Video Game Monster Is Time
    One of the few things that players have control over is the passage of time. You can slow it, pause it, rewind or fast forward but time will always, inevitably advance.


  • The Competitive Vaping National Championship*
    It all comes down to this. This weekend, 14 women and a seemingly endless men traveled to Las Vegas to vie against one another for glory, prize money, free stuff and the chance to prove that all that time spent puffing on an e-cig wasn't wasted.



  • The Pastor Who Kimye and Bieber Made Famous
    For most of televangelicalism's history, the TV follows the church. But when Vous Church was born last fall, its arrival was documented on an Oxygen reality show calledRich in Faith, and even then, the titular Rich, Pastor Rich Wilkerson Jr., was already almost famous.




  • The Bird That Understands Humans
    On the African savanna, a fascinating and unprecedented partnership between people and wild birds gets started with a simple "brrr-hm."



  • What I've Learned Cutting Hair In Jail
    I get sent to the hole all the time. Not because I’ve done something wrong, but because I’m the barber, which means I’m also the best friend of every guy in there. I cuteveryone’s hair, from murderers and rapists to first-timers put in for a fight.


  • Mapping The 10,000 Most Powerful Earthquakes Since 1900
    Since 1900, there have been over 10,000 earthquakes that have registered above a 6 on the Richter Scale, including the 6.2 and 6.8 quakes that hitItalyand Myanmar this week.This animated map shows the locations of those earthquakes appearing in chronological order.







  • Ever Used A McDonald’s Drive Thru? Thank The US Army
    Army regulations near Fort Huachuca in Sierra Vista, Arizona prevented soldiers from wearing their fatigues in local businesses around the base.The local McDonalds wanted to accommodate the soldiers and decided to install a window that the soldiers could drive up to and order from their cars.



  • Seriously, Stop Driving Slowly In The Left Hand Lane
    In case you missed the memo, the left lane is for passing. When you take your sweet time on the left, faster drivers have to weave through traffic and change lanes multiple times increasing the risk of accident.


  • Attack Of The Killer Robots
    Forget about drones, forget about dystopian sci-fi — a terrifying new generation of autonomous weapons is already here. Meet the small band of dedicated optimists battling nefarious governments and bureaucratic tedium to stop the proliferation of killer robots and, just maybe, save humanity from itself.




  • A Brief History Of Annoying Children's TV Characters
    Television programming for children is not known for its subtlety. Keeping the attention of small viewers requires literal bells and whistles, which means TV shows for kids are usually loud, bright, and, frankly, pretty annoying.





  • Players Seek 'No Man's Sky' Refunds, Sony's Content Director Calls Them Thieves
    thegarbz writes: As was covered previously on Slashdot the very hyped up game No Man's Sky was released to a lot of negative reviews about game-crashing bugs and poor interface choices. Now that players have had more time to play the game it has become clear that many of the features hyped by developers are not present in the game, and users quickly started describing the game as "boring".   Now, likely due to misleading advertising, Steam has begun allowing refunds for No Man's Sky regardless of playtime, and there are reports of players getting refunds on the Play Station Network as well despite Sony's strict no refund policy.  Besides Sony, Amazon is also issuing refunds, according to game sites. In response, Sony's former Strategic Content Director, Shahid Kamal Ahmad, wrote on Twitter, "If you're getting a refund after playing a game for 50 hours you're a thief." He later added "Here's the good news: Most players are not thieves. Most players are decent, honest people without whose support there could be no industry." In a follow-up he acknowledged it was fair to consider a few hours lost to game-breaking crashes, adding "Each case should be considered on its own merits and perhaps I shouldn't be so unequivocal."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • 'Longest Living Human' Says He Is Ready For Death At 145
    Slashdot reader schwit1 quotes an article from The Telegraph: An Indonesian man who claims to be the longest living human in recorded history has described how he "just wants to die". Mbah Gotho, from Sragen in central Java, was born on December 31, 1870, according to the date of birth on his identity card. Now officials at the local record office say they have finally been able to confirm that remarkable date as genuine. If independently confirmed, the findings would make Mr Gotho a staggering 145 years old -- and the longest lived human in recorded history. "One of Mr Gotho's grandsons said his grandfather has been preparing for his death ever since he was 122," according to the article. Though he lived long enough to meet his great-great grandchildren, he's already outlived four wives, all 10 of his brothers and sisters, and all of his children.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • RIP John Ellenby, Godfather of the Modern Laptop
    John Ellenby managed the development of the Alto II before starting the company that built the world's first successful "clamshell" laptop. Slashdot reader fragMasterFlash quotes the New York Times: Ellenby, a British-born computer engineer who played a critical role in paving the way for the laptop computer, died on August 17 in San Francisco. He was 75... Mr. Ellenby's pioneering work came to fruition in the early 1980s, after he founded Grid Systems, a company in Mountain View, California. As chief executive, he assembled an engineering and design team that included the noted British-born industrial designer William Moggridge. The team produced a clamshell computer with an orange electroluminescent flat-panel display that was introduced as the Compass. It went to market in 1982. The Compass is now widely acknowledged to have been far ahead of its time.  Back in the 1980s, NASA used them as backup navigational devices on the space shuttle -- one was recovered from the wreckage of the Space Shuttle Challenger -- and John Poindexter, America's national security advisor during the Reagan administration, described them as "built like an armored tank". Data storage cost $8,150 -- equivalent to $20,325 today.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • New Ransomware Poses As A Windows Update
    Slashdot reader MojoKid quotes an article from Hot Hardware: A security researcher for AVG has discovered a new piece of ransomware called Fantom that masquerades as a critical Windows update. Victims who fall for the ruse will see a Windows screen acting like it's installing the update, but what's really happening is that the user's documents and files are being encrypted in the background...   The scam starts with a pop-up labeled as a critical update from Microsoft. Once a user decides to apply the fake update, it extracts files and executes an embedded program called WindowsUpdate.exe... As with other EDA2 ransomware, Fantom generates a random AES-128 key, encrypts it using RSA, and then uploads it to the culprit. From there, Fantom targets specific file extensions and encrypts those files using AES-128 encryption... Users affected by this are instructed to email the culprit for payment instructions.   While the ransomware is busy encrypting your files, it displays Microsoft's standard warning about not turning off the computer while the "update" is in progress. Pressing Ctrl+F4 closes that window, according to the article, "but that doesn't stop the ransomware from encrypting files in the background."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Kim Dotcom Will Revive Megaupload, Linking File Transfers To Bitcoin Microtransactions
    Long-time Slashdot reader SonicSpike quotes an article from Fortune: The controversial entrepreneur Kim Dotcom said last month that he was preparing to relaunch Megaupload, the file-sharing site that U.S. and New Zealand authorities dramatically shut down in 2012, with bitcoins being involved in some way... This system will be called Bitcache, and Dotcom claimed its launch would send the bitcoin price soaring way above its current $575 value. The launch of Megaupload 2.0 will take place on January 20, 2017, he said, urging people to "buy bitcoin while cheap, like right now, trust me..." Crucially, Dotcom said the Bitcache system would overcome bitcoin's scaling problems. "It eliminates all blockchain limitations," he claimed.  Every file transfer taking place over Megaupload "will be linked to a tiny Bitcoin micro transaction," Dotcom posted on Twitter. His extradition trial begins Monday, and he's asking the court to allow live-streaming of the trial "because of global interest in my case." Meanwhile, the FBI apparently let the registration lapse on the Megaupload domain, which they seized in 2012, and Ars Technica reports that the site is now full of porn ads.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • EU Copyright Reform Proposes Search Engines Pay For Snippets
    An anonymous Slashdot reader reports that the European Commission "is planning reforms that would allow media outlets to request payment from search engines such as Google, for publishing snippets of their content in search results." The Stack reports:  The working paper recommends the introduction of an EU law that covers the rights to digital reproduction of news publications. This would essentially make news publishers a new category of rights holders under copyright law, thereby ensuring that "the creative and economic contribution of news publishers is recognized and incentivized in EU law, as it is today the case for other creative sectors."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Microsoft Lost a City Because They Used Wikipedia Data
    "Microsoft can't tell North from South on Bing Maps," joked The Register, reporting that Microsoft's site had "misplaced Melbourne, the four-million-inhabitant capital of the Australian State of Victoria." Long-time Slashdot reader RockDoctor writes: Though they're trying to minimise it, the recent relocation of Melbourne Australia to the ocean east of Japan in Microsoft's flagship mapping application is blamed on someone having flipped a sign in the latitude given for the city's Wikipedia page. Which may or may not be true. But the simple stupidity of using a globally-editable data source for feeding a mapping and navigation system is ... "awesome" is (for once) an appropriate word.   Well, it's Bing, so at least no-one was actually using it.   "Bing's not alone in finding Australia hard to navigate," reports The Register. "In 2012 police warned not to use Apple Maps as it directed those seeking the rural Victorian town of Mildura into the middle of a desert."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Apple Fixes Three Zero Days Used In Targeted Attack
    Trailrunner7 quotes a report from On The Wire: Apple has patched three critical vulnerabilities in iOS that were identified when an attacker targeted a human rights activist in the UAE with an exploit chain that used the bugs to attempt to remotely jailbreak and infect his iPhone. The vulnerabilities include two kernel flaws and one in WebKit and Apple released iOS 9.3.5 to fix them. The attack that set off the investigation into the vulnerabilities targeted Ahmed Mansoor, an activist living in the UAE. Earlier this month, he received a text message that included a link to what was supposedly new information on human rights abuses. Suspicious, Manor forwarded the link to researchers at the University of Toronto's Citizen Lab, who recognized what they were looking at. "On August 10 and 11, 2016, Mansoor received SMS text messages on his iPhone promising ;new secrets' about detainees tortured in UAE jails if he clicked on an included link. Instead of clicking, Mansoor sent the messages to Citizen Lab researchers. We recognized the links as belonging to an exploit infrastructure connected to NSO Group, an Israel-based 'cyber war' company that sells Pegasus, a government-exclusive "lawful intercept" spyware product," Citizen Lab said in a new report on the attack and iOS flaws.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Japanese Government Plans Cyber Attack Institute
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Stack: The government of Japan will create an institute to train employees to counter cyber attacks. The institute, which will be operational early next year, will focus on preventing cyber attacks on electrical systems and other infrastructure. The training institute, which will operate as part of Japan's Information Technology Promotion Agency (IPA), is the first center for training in Japan to focus on preventing cyber attacks. A government source said that the primary aims will be preventing a large-scale blackout during the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics in 2020, and stopping leaks of sensitive power plant designs. The source also stated that there is potential for a joint exercise in cyber awareness between the Japanese group and foreign cybersecurity engineers in the future.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • 'Social Media ID, Please?' Proposed US Law Greeted With Anger
    The U.S. government announced plans to require some foreign travelers to provide their social media account names when entering the country -- and in June requested comments. Now the plan is being called "ludicrous," an "all-around bad idea," "blatant overreach," "desperate, paranoid heavy-handedness," "preposterous," "appalling," and "un-American," reports Slashdot reader dcblogs: That's just a sampling of the outrage. Some 800 responded to the U.S. request for comments about a proposed rule affecting people traveling from "visa waiver" countries to the U.S., where a visa is not required. This includes most of Europe, Singapore, Chile, Japan, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand... In a little twist of irony, some critics said U.S. President Obama's proposal for foreign travelers is so bad, it must have been hatched by Donald Trump.    "Travelers will be asked to provide their Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Google+, and whatever other social ID you can imagine to U.S. authorities," reports Computer World. "It's technically an 'optional' request, but since it's the government asking, critics believe travelers will fear consequences if they ignore it..."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Domino's Will Deliver Pizza By Drone and By Robot
    An anonymous Slashdot reader quotes CNN Money's report that "pizzas will soon be dropping from the heavens":  Domino's demonstrated its ability to deliver food via a drone Thursday in New Zealand and plans to test actual deliveries to customers next month. "It doesn't add up to deliver a two kilogram package in a two-ton vehicle," said Scott Bush, a general manager for Domino's Pizza Enterprises, which is independent of the U.S. chain and operates in seven countries. "In Auckland, we have such massive traffic congestion it just makes sense to take to the airways."   A Domino's customer who requests a drone delivery will receive a notification when their delivery is approaching. After going outside and hitting a button on their smartphone, the drone will lower the food via a tether. Once the package is released, the drone pulls the tether back up and flies back to the Domino's store.    Robotics Trends has video from the flight, and reports that Domino's is also testing a pizza-delivering robot. Their Domino's Robotics Unit "has four wheels, is less than three feet tall, and has a heated compartment that can hold up to 10 pizzas. It can deliver pizzas within a 12.5-mile radius before needing to be recharged."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • US Patients Battle EpiPen Prices And Regulations By Shopping Online
    "The incredible increase in the cost of EpiPens, auto-injectors that can stop life-threatening emergencies caused by allergic reactions, has hit home on Capitol Hill," reports CNN. Slashdot reader Applehu Akbar reports that the argument "has now turned into civil war in the US Senate":  One senator's daughter relies on Epi-Pen, while another senator's daughter is CEO of Mylan, the single company that is licensed to sell these injectors in the US. On the worldwide market there is no monopoly on these devices... Is it finally time to allow Americans to go online and fill their prescriptions on the world market?    Time reports some patients are ordering cheaper EpiPens from Canada and other countries online, "an act that the FDA says is technically illegal and potentially dangerous." But the FDA also has "a backlog of about 4,000 generic drugs" awaiting FDA approval, reports PRI, noting that in the meantime prices have also increased for drugs treating cancer, hepatitis C, and high cholesterol. In Australia, where the drug costs just $38, one news outlet reports that the U.S. "is the only developed nation on Earth which allows pharmaceutical companies to set their own prices."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Linus Loves GPL, But Hates GPL Lawsuits
    Long-time Slashdot reader sfcrazy writes: During LinuxCon, Torvalds was full of praise for GNU GPL: "The GPL ensures that nobody is ever going to take advantage of your code. It will remain free and nobody can take that away from you. I think that's a big deal for community management... FSF [Free Software Foundation] and I don't have a loving relationship, but I love GPL v2. I really think the license has been one of the defining factors in the success of Linux because it enforced that you have to give back, which meant that the fragmentation has never been something that has been viable from a technical standpoint." And he thinks the BSD license is bad for everyone: "Over the years, I've become convinced that the BSD license is great for code you don't care about," Torvalds said. But Linus also addressed the issue of enforcing the GPL on the Linux foundation mailing list when someone proposed a discussion of it at Linuxcon. "I think the whole GPL enforcement issue is absolutely something that should be discussed, but it should be discussed with the working title 'Lawyers: poisonous to openness, poisonous to community, poisonous to projects'... quite apart from the risk of loss in a court, the real risk is something that happens whether you win or lose, and in fact whether you go to court or just threaten: the loss of community, and in particular exactly the kind of community that can (and does) help. You lose your friends."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • BitTorrent Cases Filed By Malibu Media Will Proceed, Rules Judge
    Long-time Slashdot reader NewYorkCountryLawyer writes: In the federal court for the Eastern District of New York, where all Malibu Media cases have been stayed for the past year, the Court has lifted the stay and denied the motion to quash in the lead case, thus permitting all 84 cases to move forward. In his 28-page decision (PDF), Magistrate Judge Steven I. Locke accepted the representations of Malibu's expert, one Michael Patzer from a company called Excipio, that in detecting BitTorrent infringement he relies on "direct detection" rather than "indirect detection", and that it is "not possible" for there to be misidentification.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • New SWEET32 Crypto Attacks Speed Up Deprecation of 3DES, Blowfish
    Researchers "have devised a new way to decrypt secret cookies which could leave your passwords vulnerable to theft," reports Digital Trends. Slashdot reader msm1267 writes: New attacks revealed today against 64-bit block ciphers push cryptographic ciphers such as Triple-DES (3DES) and Blowfish closer to extinction. The attacks, known as SWEET32, allow for the recovery of authentication cookies from HTTPS traffic protected by 3DES, and BasicAUTH credentials from OpenVPN traffic protected by default by Blowfish. In response, OpenSSL is expected to remove 3DES from its default bulid in 1.1.0, and lower its designation from High to Medium 1.0.2 and 1.0.1. OpenVPN, meanwhile, is expected to release a new version as well with a warning about Blowfish and new configuration advice protecting against the SWEET32 attacks. The researchers behind SWEET32 said this is a practical attack because collisions begin after a relatively short amount of data is introduced. By luring a victim to a malicious site, the attacker can inject JavaScript into the browser that forces the victim to connect over and over to a site they're authenticated to. The attacker can then collect enough of that traffic -- from a connection that is kept alive for a long period of time -- to recover the session cookie.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.






  • 'Fake CEO' Chinese chap cuffed in $54m fraud probe
    Money laundering charges after chief exec imitation trick
    Police in Hong Kong have arrested a Chinese man on charges of laundering the proceeds of an online robbery that netted millions of dollars.…


  • Rackspace finds its $4.3bn sugar daddy
    Cloud wrangler inks deal to go private
    Cloud management provider Rackspace says that it will be going private in a deal that will pay shareholders $4.3bn.…




  • Go forth Spitzer! To infinity and....
    Telescope to enter new "Beyond" phase
    NASA’s trusty Spitzer Space Telescope is set to enter the next stage of its mission which has been dubbed “Beyond” in October.…








  • Corporates ARE sniffing around Windows 10, says Computacenter
    Half-yearly results lets them punt unloved OS again
    Bulky corporate enterprise punters are starting to fall for the, ahem, charms of Windows 10, Computacenter's chief executive claimed today as he flashed his firm’s calendar first half-year trading figures.…


  • Pure Storage notches up a 93 per cent growth rate. Not bad, not bad
    They're still losing tens of millions, though
    Pure Storage grew revenues 93 per per cent year-on-year in its second fiscal 2017 quarter to a record $163.2m, achieving an annual run rate of $650m; the billion looks attainable. NetApp's all-flash array run rate is about $775m while EMC's is a past a billion dollars.…





  • Robot babies fail in role as teenage sex deterrents
    'Infant simulators' that cry and go Code Brown don't stop girls from having actual kids
    Robot babies have been found to be an ineffective educational tool for those hoping to prevent teenaged pregnancies.…


  • Sysadmin sticks finger in pipe, saves data centre from flood
    Then the suits boarded up an exhaust vent that dirtied their BMWs
    On-Call Thank Crom it's Friday! At the end of today you can get on with what is best in life, which we hope includes reading this instalment of On-Call, our weekly look at legendary tales of IT gone wrong.…




  • Mozilla breathes petition-of-fire at EU copyright laws
    A plague on artists using pre-internet IP laws to ruin your holiday snaps, and the Internet
    The Mozilla Foundation has decided the time is right to scorch the European Union's copyright law, which it says “undermines innovation and creativity on the internet.”…


  • Juno probe to graze Jupiter on Saturday
    Closest encounter with gas giant will see craft close to just 4,200km from cloud-tops
    Strap in for a bumpy ride, Earthlings: the Juno probe will make its closest approach to Jupiter on Saturday when it comes within just 4,200km of the gas giant's uppermost clouds.…


  • A USB stick as a file server? We've done it!
    SanDisk's 'Connect Wireless Stick' is made for mobile, but we've bent it to become a 'Campfire NAS'
    Road test Last week Vulture South got its hands on an intriguing SanDisk product called the “Connect Wireless Stick”.…





  • IoT manufacturer caught fixing security holes
    Smart lock maker August fails to ignore flaws
    In a shocking development, smart lock manufacturer August has been caught promptly patching security holes discovered in its product.…


  • MIT brainiacs triple the speed, double the range of Wi-Fi
    MegaMIMO gives data a smooth ride
    Video Researchers at MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab (CSAIL) think they have perfected a system that dramatically improves Wi-Fi connections by eliminating signal interference.…







  • NHS injects tender for PC and peripherals kit with 500m
    Who said there's no money in the kitty for junior doctors... oh Gov.UK did
    The UK's NHS has a 500m budget to burn on PCs, printers and monitors in the latest mega framework tender to be dangled in front of ravenous tech suppliers.…



  • WhatsApp is to hand your phone number to Facebook
    Roses are red, violets are blue, Facebook knows all that you think, say and do
    WhatsApp has updated its terms and privacy policy for the first time in four years as part of parent company Facebook’s plans to generate cash through app users' data.…


  • Tech Data swings and misses Wall Street moneymen's target
    CEO: IT spending weaker than expected but we grabbed rivals by the short and curlies
    Tech Data's latest quarterly financials show a distributor wrestling with “weaker than expected” IT spending and trying to dip into “pockets of demand” across Europe and the Americas.…





  • Arthur C Clarke award won by Adrian Tchaikovsky
    Children of Time features talking space spiders
    The book Children of Time by British sci-fi author Adrian Tchaikovsky has been announced as the winner of this year’s Arthur C Clarke award.…






  • Movers and shakers: Execs take a hike from Lenovo and HPE
    Plus one greybeard lands at enterprise licensing biz Crayon
    A couple of industry greybeards at Lenovo and Hewlett Packard Enterprise have quietly packed their bags for a permanent vacation while another vendor old timer has moved to another channel biz.…


Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM