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  • Red Hat: 2014:1101-01: kernel: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated kernel packages that fix multiple security issues and several bugs are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.4 Extended Update Support. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Important security [More...]



  • A track for everyone at OpenStack Summit
    On Tuesday, the OpenStack Foundation released the schedule for the upcoming summit in Paris, France. It's a monster of an agenda, featuring over 150 accepted talks and sessions, out of more than 1,100 proposed and voted on by community members.




  • Did Red Hat’s CTO Walk – Or Was He Pushed?
    It’s hard to believe the official story coming out of Raleigh, that CTO Brian Stevens abruptly resigned his position at Red Hat on Wednesday “to pursue another opportunity.” The company is being mainly mum on the subject, only offering a terse three sentence announcement on their website.


  • Fedora: From Live boot, to installation, to upgrade
    Linux New Media, the publishers of Linux Pro Magazine, recently published a special edition issue called Free from XP, which features Fedora 20. Recently they posted the Fedora installation article […]



  • Open source communities start to buzz about edX
    Open source software is hugely important to us here at edX, since it's what we do all day, every day. Two weeks ago, the O'Reilly company hosted their annual OSCON convention in Portland, Oregon—a convention focused on open source software. Of course, we had to be there. So, my edX colleague James Tauber and I packed our bags and headed to Oregon for a week of learning and teaching to meet wonderful people, and to get excited about open source. We even gave a presentation about edX!read more


  • How to install and configure ownCloud on Debian
    According to its official website, ownCloud gives you universal access to your files through a web interface or WebDAV. It also provides a platform to easily view, edit and sync your contacts, calendars and bookmarks across all your devices. Even though ownCloud is very similar to the widely-used Dropbox cloud storage, the primary difference is […]Continue reading...The post How to install and configure ownCloud on Debian appeared first on Xmodulo.Related FAQs:How to set up a transparent HTTPS filtering proxy on CentOS How to set up a secure FTP service with vsftpd on Linux


  • How To Build PHP 5.6 (PHP-FPM & FastCGI) with Zend OPcache And APCu For ISPConfig 3 On Debian 7 (Wheezy)
    How To Build PHP 5.6 (PHP-FPM & FastCGI) with Zend OPcache And APCu For ISPConfig 3 On Debian 7 (Wheezy)ISPConfig 3 has a builtin feature to support multiple PHP versions on one server and select the optimal PHP version for a website. This feature works with PHP-FPM and FastCGI. This tutorial shows how to build PHP 5.6 as a PHP-FPM and a FastCGI version on a Debian Wheezy server. These PHP 5.5 builds include Zend OPcache, and APCu.


  • Black Lab SDK 1.8 released
    Today we have released the new Black Lab SDK 1.8. With this release we added a lot of new tools for developing applications for Black Lab Linux and Ubuntu. The Black Lab SDK 1.8 has been tested and is supported on the following distributions: Black Lab Linux 5.x/6.x, Ubuntu 14.04, Kubuntu 14.04




  • Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) beta-1 released!
    The first beta of the Utopic Unicorn (to become 14.10) has now beenreleased! This beta features images for Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu GNOME,UbuntuKylin, Xubuntu and the Ubuntu Cloud images.


  • Determined Developer Resurrects Windows XP with Unofficial Service Pack 4
    Diehard Windows XP fans are having a hard time bidding the legacy operating system farewll -- by the numbers, it's estimated that some 15 percent (StatCounter) to just under 25 percent (Net Applications) of desktops are still running Windows XP. Save for businesses that pay a fee, Microsoft killed off support for Windows XP back in April, though one developer is determined to keep it alive with a new (and unofficial) Service Pack.


  • MIPS tempts hackers with Raspbery Pi-like dev board
    Hard to choose between Raspberry Pi, BeagleBone Black, and MinnowBoard Max? Now there’s another choice: the open source MIPS-based “Creator C120″ dev board. In a bid to harness some of the energy and enthusiasm swirling around today’s open, hackable single board computers Imagination Technologies, licensor of the MIPS ISA, has unveiled the ISA’s counter to […]


  • LibreOffice 4.3.1 “Fresh” announced
    The Document Foundation announces LibreOffice 4.3.1, the first minor release of LibreOffice 4.3 “fresh” family, with over 100 fixes (including patches for two CVEs, backported to LibreOffice 4.2.6-secfix, which is also available for download now).


  • Mid-cycle meetups for OpenStack developers and users
    Taking place twice a year, OpenStack's summits provide a great deal of the face-to-face interaction between developers, vendors, and users. But what about the rest of the year? Many projects opt to host mid-cycle meetups to bridge the gap to collaborate, make plans for the future, and knock out major tasks.



  • Mini-ITX board offers life after Marshalltowns death
    Habey announced an enhanced replacement for Intel’s discontinued Marshalltown thin Mini-ITX board. It jumps up to a 2GHz quad-core “Bay Trail-D” Celeron. Intel introduced the Desktop Board DN2800MT (aka “Marshalltown”) in Q1 of 2012 and it’s now gone EOL according to the product’s Intel ARK page. So Habey, the California-based subsidiary of Chinese firm NORCO Intelligent Technology, has seized on the opportunity to satisfy continuing Marshalltown demand by cranking out a “drop-in replacement” board backed by an assurance of long life-cycle support.



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  • Bye, Google Maps
    Citymapper is what happens when you actually understand user experience.





  • When Should You Show Up To A Party?
    Faced with an easy choice — get to a party on time and feel weird, or go late and arrive when everyone’s there — we’ve all adopted an unspoken rule: We arrive a bit after the advertised start time.






  • What Exactly Is The Dew Point?
    If you just read the words “Dew Point” and assumed it’s the time of day you can finally crack open a Mountain Dew, you are wrong.




  • Why Catherine Bellis Should Sue The NCAA
    Here's what America's Newest Tennis Sweetheart should do: Take the money, stick it in a trust fund, and smile for the cameras. Then, hire a lawyer and sue the shit out of the NCAA.



  • Music Streaming Is Booming, And That’s A Problem For Music Sales
    The problem for the music business is that most music streamers — around 80 percent of them — are free music streamers, relying on services like YouTube, Pandora and SoundCloud for the tunes, says Midia Research. And those ad-supported businesses generate about 10 percent of the revenue per user that subscription businesses do.


  • Snoop Dogg Is Now A White Guy Named Todd
    So this is what Snoop does in his spare time. Would have pegged him for more of a hacky sack kind of guy. Also, how much do you think White Men Connect is paying him?




  • Drake And Chris Brown Are Now On NYPD 'Hip Hop Squad' Watch List
    The NYPD’s “Hip-Hop Squad” has a number of rappers and stars — including Drake, Chris Brown and French Montana — on a special watch list and is stepping up surveillance on their New York parties in the wake of the Suge Knight shooting in LA, we’re told.


  • There Are Two Volcanoes Freaking People Out All Over The World Right Now
    Two volcanoes half a world apart are causing havoc today: Several flights have been diverted around an eruption in Papua New Guinea, and authorities in Iceland briefly put aviation on highest alert (again) due to a temperamental Mount Bardarbunga, which has been rumbling for the past week.


  • What We Learned This Week
    This week we learned why you don't piss off Bill Gates, people will pay more for a cooler than a smartwatch, and Tony didn't die at the end of "The Sopranos."


  • Branding Guyana
    Guyana is a place, unlike Aruba or Jamaica, not on anyone’s list of dream destinations. A few months earlier, I’d gotten an email asking if I wanted to visit. The note was from a company contracting development work from USAID. One of its projects was to rebrand the tiny, corrupt nation and promote ecotourism. I knew the catch.



  • Remembering The Wylie-Hoffert Case, A Double Murder With Three Victims
    A little over 50 years ago, in the last days of a summer something like this one, a woman returned home from her publishing job to find a literal bloody mess. Calculating how long it took her to return to Manhattan, police guessed she'd walked in on the crime-in-progress. Everything else was pure mystery.


  • How Much Should A Landlord Pay A Tenant To Move Out Of An Apartment?
    A rent-controlled apartment may be the most coveted asset in San Francisco. While rents are increasing 30-40% per year in parts of the city, rent control limits increases to about 1% a year. Landlords grumble about this discrepancy, but rent control is a fixture of the market; the vast majority of apartments in the city have been rent-controlled for decades.




  • Scientists Find Dimmer Switch For Memories In Mice
    Using a technique in which light is used to switch neurons on and off, neuroscientists at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology appear to have unlocked some secrets about how the brain attaches emotions to memories and how those emotions can be adjusted.





  • What Time Is It In The Universe?
    Even with all his moving and accelerating, with the planet, the solar system, getting on planes, taking elevators, and perhaps even some light jogging. In the immortal words of Kool Moe Dee. Do you know what time it is?Didn't Einstein tell us it's all relative? Does anyone actually know what time it is? I mean, aside from figuratively, or in a political sense.


  • Is Health Goth The New Street Goth?
    As an aesthetic it clearly owes a debt to street goth, but focuses on performance sportswear, bionic body parts, the hyperreal digital imagery seen in adverts and Net art, combat gear, and because being out of shape isn't futuristic, a dedication to athleticism.




  • Seven Days And Nights In The World's Largest, Rowdiest Retirement Community
    Boasting 100,000 residents over the age of 55, The Villages may be the fastest growing city in America. It’s a notorious boomtown for boomers who want to spend their golden years with access to 11 a.m. happy hours, thousands of activities, and no-strings-attached sex, all lorded over by one elusive billionaire.


  • Ebola Virus Mutating Rapidly As It Spreads
    The Ebola epidemic in West Africa has already killed more than 1,400 people — including five of the co-authors of the study decoding the virus. The paper is dedicated to their memory.


  • The World's First Live Anime
    Minarai Diva is the story of two idols in training: Ruri Aoi and Ui Harune. Over the course of each episode, they write lyrics to and even sing a newly completed song by the time it ends.  And it happens live right before your very eyes! Well, sort of.


  • MSN Messenger Is Finally Shutting Down After 15 Years
    Microsoft’s MSN Messenger, or Windows Live Messenger as it’s now known, will be fully retired on October 31st. The software maker originally announced its plans to shift users over to Skype last year, but Microsoft kept the service running in China. After October 31st Chinese Messenger users will need to use Skype, bringing an end to 15 years of the service.




  • World's Smartest Cities
    Essential places, people, trends, and ideas that have turned the world’s most intelligent cities into travelers’ hottest tickets.



  • An Atlantic City Piano Man Versus The Casinos
    Two years ago New Jersey’s casino development authority chose the house at 311 Oriental Avenue as one of the buildings it planned to condemn. It was destroying homes in order to create a two-a-half-block tourism district designed to enhance the fortunes of the flagging Revel casino. Almost every other owner of the 62 low-rise buildings and adjoining parcels to be condemned accepted the prices they were offered for their properties, but not Charlie Birnbaum.





  • The NFL’s Uneven History Of Punishing Domestic Violence
    Following the Rice incident, I went looking for every NFL suspension1 issued in the league’s 94-year history. I wanted to understand how violations like Rice’s, the ones unrelated to steroid or substance abuse, were determined. If domestic abuse warranted two games, what kinds of conduct violations warranted five games? Eight games? An entire season?


  • How Do They Pull Off The Vertigo Effect In Movies?
    You probably arrived at this page after pressing pause on "Vertigo" or "Jaws" or "Raging Bull" or "Poltergeist" or "Goodfellas" or "The Wire." A certain camera trick used in each of them might have broken your brain. While objects in the foreground appear the same size throughout a shot, objects in the background appear to morph in size.



  • How Would Stanley Kubrick Make A Videogame?
    Jack de Quidt talks about videogames as if they were made out of a fine silk. He describes how they feel to touch, how they smell, and what tastes they bring to the tongue. De Quidt doesn't just play games but seems to absorb them through his every orifice.


  • Anti-Ebola Drug ZMapp Makes Clean Sweep: 18 of 18 Monkeys Survive Infection
    Scientific American reports, based on a study published today in Nature, that ZMapp, the drug that has been used to treat seven patients during the current Ebola epidemic in West Africa, can completely protect monkeys against the virus, research has found. ... The drug — a cocktail of three purified immune proteins, or monoclonal antibodies, that target the Ebola virus — has been given to seven people: two US and three African health-care workers, a British nurse and a Spanish priest. The priest and a Liberian health-care worker who got the drug have since died. There is no way to tell whether ZMapp has been effective in the patients who survived, because they received the drug at different times during the course of their disease and received various levels of medical care. NPR also has an interview with study lead Gary Kobinger, who says that (very cautious) human trials are in the works, and emphasizes the difficulites of producing the drug in quantity.







  • Islamic State "Laptop of Doom" Hints At Plots Including Bubonic Plague
    Foreign Policy has an in-depth look at the contents of a laptop reportedly seized this year in Syria from a stronghold of the organization now known as the Islamic State, and described as belonging to a Tunisian national ("Muhammed S."). The "hidden documents" folder of the machine, says the report, contained a vast number of documents, including ones describing and justifying biological weapons: The laptop's contents turn out to be a treasure trove of documents that provide ideological justifications for jihadi organizations -- and practical training on how to carry out the Islamic State's deadly campaigns. They include videos of Osama bin Laden, manuals on how to make bombs, instructions for stealing cars, and lessons on how to use disguises in order to avoid getting arrested while traveling from one jihadi hot spot to another. ... The information on the laptop makes clear that its owner is a Tunisian national named Muhammed S. who joined ISIS in Syria and who studied chemistry and physics at two universities in Tunisia's northeast. Even more disturbing is how he planned to use that education: The ISIS laptop contains a 19-page document in Arabic on how to develop biological weapons and how to weaponize the bubonic plague from infected animals. ... "The advantage of biological weapons is that they do not cost a lot of money, while the human casualties can be huge," the document states.







  • Ask Slashdot: What Old Technology Can't You Give Up?
    An anonymous reader writes: It's the year 2014, and I still have a floppy drive installed on my computer. I don't know why; I don't own any floppy disks, and I haven't used one in probably a decade. But every time I put together a PC, it feels incomplete if I don't have one. I also have a Laserdisc player collecting dust at the bottom of my entertainment center, and I still use IRC to talk to a few friends. Software, hardware, or otherwise, what technology have you had a hard time letting go? (I don't want to put a hard limit on age, so you folks using flip-phones or playing on Dreamcasts or still inexplicably coding in Perl 4, feel free to contribute.)







  • Study: Social Networks Have Negative Effect On Individual Welfare
    An anonymous reader writes: A study of 50,000 people in Italy has found the impact of social networking on individual welfare to be "significantly negative." The researchers found that improvements in self-reported well-being occurred when online networking led to face-to-face interactions, but this effect was overwhelmed by the perceived losses in well-being (PDF) generated by interaction strictly through social networks. The researchers "highlight the role of discrimination and hate speech on social media which they say play a significant role in trust and well-being. Better moderation could significantly improve the well-being of the people who use social networks, they conclude."







  • Particle Physics To Aid Nuclear Cleanup
    mdsolar sends this report from Symmetry Magazine: Cosmic rays can help scientists do something no one else can: safely image the interior of the nuclear reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi plant. ... [M]uon tomography is similar to taking an X-ray, only it uses naturally produced muons. These particles don't damage the imaged materials and, because they already stream through everything on Earth, they can be used to image even the most sensitive objects. Better yet, a huge amount of shielding is needed to stop muons from passing through an object, making it nearly impossible to hide from muon tomography. ... By determining how muons scatter as they interact with electrons and nuclei within the item, the team's software creates a three-dimensional picture of what's inside. ... To prove the technology, the Los Alamos team shipped a demo detector system to a small, working nuclear reactor in a Toshiba facility in Kawasaki, Japan. There, they placed one detector on either side of the reactor core. "When we analyzed our data we discovered that in addition to the fuel in the reactor core, they had put a few fuel bundles off to the side that we didn't know about," says Morris. "They were really impressed that not only could we image the core, but that we also found those bundles."







  • Mozilla To Support Public Key Pinning In Firefox 32
    Trailrunner7 writes: Mozilla is planning to add support for public-key pinning in its Firefox browser in an upcoming version. In version 32, which would be the next stable version of the browser, Firefox will have key pins for a long list of sites, including many of Mozilla's own sites, all of the sites pinned in Google Chrome and several Twitter sites. Public-key pinning has emerged as an important defense against a variety of attacks, especially man-in-the-middle attacks and the issuance of fraudulent certificates. The function essentially ties a public key, or set of keys, issued by known-good certificate authorities to a given domain. So if a user's browser encounters a site that's presenting a certificate that isn't included in the set of pinned public keys for that domain, it will then reject the connection. The idea is to prevent attackers from using fake certificates in order to intercept secure traffic between a user and the target site.







  • This 'SimCity 4' Region With 107 Million People Took Eight Months of Planning
    Jason Koebler writes: Peter Richie spent eight months planning and building a megacity in vanilla SimCity 4, and the end result is mind-boggling: 107.7 million people living in one massive, sprawling region (video). "Traffic is a nightmare, both above ground and under," Richie said. "The massive amount of subway lines and subway stations are still congested during all times of the day in all neighborhoods of each and every mega-city in the region. The roadways are clogged at all times, but people still persist in trying to use them."







  • Robot Printer Brings Documents To Your Desk
    mrspoonsi sends this news from the BBC: Fuji Xerox has developed a new robotic printer that can move around a lounge or office to bring documents to the person who printed them. The printer is designed to be used primarily in public places as a way to keep sensitive documents secure. Sensors on the machine prevent it from bumping into people on the way. However, some analysts argued that the idea was not cost effective when compared with other secure printing methods. Fuji Xerox — a joint venture between the two firms — has been testing the printer this month at a business lounge in Tokyo. Each desk in the lounge is given a unique web address from which to print. Users access the address and upload documents to be printed. Once the printer receives the job, it moves to the intended recipient who then has to display a smart card to activate printing.







  • Intel's Haswell-E Desktop CPU Debuts With Eight Cores, DDR4 Memory
    crookedvulture writes: Intel has updated its high-end desktop platform with a new CPU-and-chipset combo. The Haswell-E processor has up to eight cores, 20MB of cache, and 40 lanes of PCI Express 3.0. It also sports a quad-channel memory controller primed for next-gen DDR4 modules. The companion X99 chipset adds a boatload of I/O, including 10 SATA ports, native USB 3.0 support, and provisions for M.2 and SATA Express storage devices. Thanks to the extra CPU cores, performance is much improved in multithreaded applications. Legacy comparisons, which include dozens of CPUs dating back to 2011, provide some interesting context for just how fast the new Core i7-5960X really is. Intel had to dial back the chip's clock speeds to accommodate the extra cores, though, and that concession can translate to slower gaming performance than Haswell CPUs with fewer, faster cores. Haswell-E looks like a clear win for applications that can exploit its prodigious CPU horsepower and I/O bandwidth, but it's clearly not the best CPU for everything. Reviews also available from Hot Hardware, PC Perspective, AnandTech, Tom's Hardware, and HardOCP.







  • IEEE Guides Software Architects Toward Secure Design
    msm1267 writes: The IEEE's Center for Secure Design debuted its first report this week, a guidance for software architects called "Avoiding the Top 10 Software Security Design Flaws." Developing guidance for architects rather than developers was a conscious effort the group made in order to steer the conversation around software security away from exclusively talking about finding bugs toward design-level failures that lead to exploitable security vulnerabilities. The document spells out the 10 common design flaws in a straightforward manner, each with a lengthy explainer of inherent weaknesses in each area and how software designers and architects should take these potential pitfalls into consideration.







  • Japanese Publishers Lash Out At Amazon's Policies
    Nate the greatest writes: Amazon is in a bitter contract fight with Hachette in the U.S. and Bonnier in Germany, and now it seems the retail giant is also in conflict with publishers in Japan. Amazon has launched a new rating system in Japan which gives preference to publishers with larger ebook catalogs (and publishers that pay higher fees), leading to complaints that Amazon is using its market power to blackmail publishers. Where have we heard that complaint before? The retailer is also being boycotted by a handful of Japanese publishers who disagree with Amazon offering a rewards program to students. The retailer gives students 10% of a book's price as points, which can be used to buy more books. This skirts Japanese fixed-price book laws, so several smaller publishers pulled their books from Amazon in protest. Businesses are out to make money and not friends, but Amazon sure is a lightning rod for conflicts, isn't it?







  • Astronomers Find What May Be the Closest Exoplanet So Far
    The Bad Astronomer writes: Astronomers have found a 5.4 Earth-mass planet orbiting the star Gliese 15A, a red dwarf in a binary system just 11.7 light years away (PDF). Other exoplanets candidates have been found that are closer, but they are as yet unconfirmed. This is more evidence that alien planets are common in the galaxy.







  • How Big Telecom Smothers Municipal Broadband
    Rick Zeman writes: The Center for Public Integrity has a comprehensive article showing how Big Telecom (aka, AT&T, Comcast, Charter, Time Warner) use lobbyists, paid-for politicians, and lawsuits (both actual and the threat thereof) in their efforts to kill municipal broadband. From the article: "The companies have also used traditional campaign tactics such as newspaper ads, push polls, direct mail and door-to-door canvassing to block municipal networks. And they've tried to undermine the appetite for municipal broadband by paying for research from think tanks and front groups to portray the networks as unreliable and costly."







  • Magnetic Stimulation Boosts Memory In Humans
    sciencehabit writes: Our memories are annoyingly glitchy. Names, dates, birthdays, and the locations of car keys fall through the cracks, losses that accelerate at an alarming pace with age and in neurodegenerative diseases. Now, by applying electromagnetic pulses through the skull to carefully targeted brain regions, researchers have found a way to boost memory performance in healthy people. The new study (abstract) sheds light on the neural networks that support memories and may lead to therapies for people with memory deficits, researchers say. Similar studies have been performed using electric current.







  • Coffee Naps Better For Alertness Than Coffee Or Naps Alone
    An anonymous reader writes: Caffeine is a staple of most workplaces — it's rare to find an office without a coffee pot or a fridge full of soda. It's necessary (or at least feels like it's necessary) because many workers have a hard time staying awake while sitting at a desk for hours at a time, and the alternative — naps — aren't usually allowed. But new research shows it might be more efficient for employers to encourage brief "coffee naps," which are more effective at returning people to an alert state than either caffeine or naps alone. A "coffee nap" is when you drink a cup of coffee, and then take a sub-20-minute nap immediately afterward. This works because caffeine takes about 20 minutes to get into your bloodstream, and a 20-minute nap clears adenosine from your brain without putting you into deeper stages of sleep. In multiple studies, tired participants who took coffee naps made fewer mistakes in a driving simulator after they awoke than the people who drank coffee without a nap or slept without ingesting caffeine.







  • US Government Fights To Not Explain No-Fly List Selection Process
    An anonymous reader writes: On August 6, U.S. District Judge Anthony Trenga ordered the federal government to "explain why the government places U.S. citizens who haven't been convicted of any violent crimes on its no-fly database." Unsurprisingly, the federal government objected to the order, once more claiming that to divulge their no-fly list criteria would expose state secrets and thus pose a national security threat. When the judge said he would read the material privately, the government insisted that reading the material "would not assist the Court in deciding the pending Motion to Dismiss (PDF) because it is not an appropriate means to test the scope of the assertion of the State Secrets privilege." The federal government has until September 7 to comply with the judge's order unless the judge is swayed by the government's objection.







  • Google Testing Drone Delivery System: 'Project Wing'
    rtoz writes: Google's research division, Google X, is developing a fleet of drones to deliver goods. This drone delivery system is called "Project Wing," and Google X has been developing it in secret for the past two years. During a recent test in Australia, drones successfully delivered a first aid kit, candy bars, dog treats, and water to a couple of Australian farmers. The self-flying vehicle uses four electrically-driven propellers to get around, and it has a wingspan of about five feet. It weighs just under 19 pounds and can take off and land without a runway. Google's long-term goal is to develop drones that could be used for disaster relief by delivering aid to isolated areas.







  • Microsoft Releases Replacement Patch With Two Known Bugs
    snydeq writes Microsoft has re-released its botched MS14-045/KB 2982791 'Blue Screen 0x50' patch, only to introduce more problems, InfoWorld's Woody Leonhard reports. "Even by Microsoft standards, this month's botched Black Tuesday Windows 7/8/8.1 MS14-045 patch hit a new low. The original patch (KB 2982791) is now officially 'expired' and a completely different patch (KB 2993651) offered in its stead; there are barely documented revelations of new problems with old patches; patches that have disappeared; a 'strong' recommendation to manually uninstall a patch that went out via Automatic Update for several days; and an infuriating official explanation that raises serious doubts about Microsoft's ability to support Windows 9's expected rapid update pace."







  • For $1.5M, DeepFlight Dragon Is an "Aircraft for the Water"
    Zothecula writes No one with red blood in their veins buys a sports car and hands the keys to a chauffeur, so one of the barriers to truly personal submarining has long been the need for a trained pilot, not to mention the massive logistics involved in transporting, garaging and launching the underwater craft ... until now. Pioneering underwater aviation company DeepFlight is set to show an entirely new type of personal submarine at the 2014 Monaco Yacht Show next week, launching the personal submarine era with a submersible that's reportedly so easy to pilot that it's likely to create a new niche in the tourism and rental market.







  • Australian Consumer Watchdog Takes Valve To Court
    angry tapir writes The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, a government funded watchdog organization, is taking Valve to court. The court action relates to Valve's Steam distribution service. According to ACCC allegations, Valve misled Australian consumers about their rights under Australian law by saying that customers were not entitled to refunds for games under any circumstances.







  • How the World's Fastest Electric Car Is Pushing Wireless Charging Tech
    An anonymous reader writes With the first ever season of Formula E revving up in China next month, it's clear there's more to electric cars than Tesla. But the race cars hitting the track in Beijing don't have anything on the speed of Drayson Racing Technology's Lola B12 69/EV, which holds the record for the world's fastest lightweight electric car, and which uses the kind of power technologies that could one day have applications off the track too—like charging your phone wirelessly.







  • Why Women Have No Time For Wikipedia
    Andreas Kolbe writes Wikipedia is well known to have a very large gender imbalance, with survey-based estimates of women contributors ranging from 8.5% to around 16%. This is a more extreme gender imbalance than even that of Reddit, the most male-dominated major social media platform, and it has a palpable effect on Wikipedia content. Moreover, Wikipedia editor survey data indicate that only 1 in 50 respondents is a mother – a good proportion of female contributors are in fact minors, with women in their twenties less likely to contribute to Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation efforts to address this "gender gap" have so far remained fruitless. Wikipedia's demographic pattern stands in marked contrast to female-dominated social media sites like Facebook and Pinterest, where women aged 18 to 34 are particularly strongly represented. It indicates that it isn't lack of time or family commitments that keep women from contributing to Wikipedia – women simply find other sites more attractive. Wikipedia's user interface and its culture of anonymity may be among the factors leading women to spend their online time elsewhere.







  • Software Error Caused Soyuz/Galileo Failure
    schwit1 writes An investigation into the recent failed Soyuz launch of the EU's Galileo satellites has found that the Russian Fregat upper stage fired correctly, but its software was programmed for the wrong orbit. From the article: "The failure of the European Union’s Galileo satellites to reach their intended orbital position was likely caused by software errors in the Fregat-MT rocket’s upper-stage, Russian newspaper Izvestia reported Thursday. 'The nonstandard operation of the integrated management system was likely caused by an error in the embedded software. As a result, the upper stage received an incorrect flight assignment, and, operating in full accordance with the embedded software, it has delivered the units to the wrong destination,' an unnamed source from Russian space Agency Roscosmos was quoted as saying by the newspaper."







  • IBM Opens Up Its Watson Supercomputer To Researchers
    An anonymous reader writes IBM has announced the "Watson Discovery Advisor" a cloud-based tool that will let researchers comb through massive troves of data, looking for insights and connections. The company says it's a major expansion in capabilities for the Watson Group, which IBM seeded with a $1 billion investment. "Scientific discovery takes us to a different level as a learning system," said Steve Gold, vice president of the Watson Group. "Watson can provide insights into the information independent of the question. The ability to connect the dots opens up a new world of possibilities."







  • The Executive Order That Led To Mass Spying, As Told By NSA Alumni
    An anonymous reader writes with this Ars piece about the executive order that is the legal basis for the U.S. government's mass spying on citizens. One thing sits at the heart of what many consider a surveillance state within the US today. The problem does not begin with political systems that discourage transparency or technologies that can intercept everyday communications without notice. Like everything else in Washington, there's a legal basis for what many believe is extreme government overreach—in this case, it's Executive Order 12333, issued in 1981. “12333 is used to target foreigners abroad, and collection happens outside the US," whistleblower John Tye, a former State Department official, told Ars recently. "My complaint is not that they’re using it to target Americans, my complaint is that the volume of incidental collection on US persons is unconstitutional.” The document, known in government circles as "twelve triple three," gives incredible leeway to intelligence agencies sweeping up vast quantities of Americans' data. That data ranges from e-mail content to Facebook messages, from Skype chats to practically anything that passes over the Internet on an incidental basis. In other words, EO 12333 protects the tangential collection of Americans' data even when Americans aren't specifically targeted—otherwise it would be forbidden under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) of 1978.












  • Ninja Pirate Zombie Vampires versus Chuck Norris and the Space Marines
    Harvest of Brains
    Weekend Big Data Project No fewer than 1,784 of you kindly volunteered to have your brains slurped in the initial stage of the Weekend Register's pioneering attempt to use hefty-data techniques to solve the most pressing puzzle of our era - namely who would win in a fight: pirates, ninjas, zombies, vampires, werewolves, aliens, robots, jedi, various kinds of human troops, and plucky civilians with improvised weapons?…



  • Community chest: Storage firms need to pay open-source debts
    Samba implementation? Time to get some devs on the job
    Storagebod Linux and *BSD have completely changed the storage market. They are the core of so many storage products, allowing startups and established vendors alike to bring new products to the market more rapidly than previously possible.…















  • The A-to-Z of storage news: Your quick 'n' dirty tasting menu
    Weren't at VMworld? Here's what you missed
    The time around VMworld - which runs from 25 to 28 August in San Francisco – saw a frenetic pace of announcements which were obliterated from the main news radar screens by things like VMware’s EVO: RAIL. Here’a catch-up list of many of them.…


  • Euro banks will rip out EVERYTHING and buy proper backend systems ... LOL, fooled ya
    Survey says everyone's winging it with IT, as usual
    European banks are in a "holding pattern" when it comes to integrating the latest technology into their core banking systems, with the majority only carrying out modernisation initiatives when necessary rather than with a view towards long-term transformation, according to a new survey.…


  • Server sales show signs of slight surge
    Hooray for hyperscale, which now outsells Oracle and Cisco
    Server sales continue to rise, according to IDC's new Worldwide Quarterly Server Tracker, which suggests the long-term outlook for servers might even be half-way decent.…



  • Like condoms, data now comes in big and HUGE sizes
    Linux Foundation lights a fire under storage devs with new conference
    If condoms were made in a range of different sizes, the old joke goes, the options would be “huge”, “gigantic” and “enormous”.…



  • Software bug caught Galileo sats in landslide, no escape from reality
    Life had just begun, code error means Russia's gone and thrown it all away
    The European Space Agency's (ESA's) embarrassment at having two of its Galileo satnav birds land in the wrong orbit has been blamed on bad programming of the Soyuz craft that hauled the satellites aloft.…



  • Feds salute plucky human ROBOT-FIGHTERS
    Winners of DEFCON robocall-crushing competition showered in cash, praise
    The United States Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has announced over US$12,000 in prizes in its “Zapping Rachel” robocall contest, which was held at this year's DEFCON hacking conference in Las Vegas.…



  • Suppose they gave a VMworld and vSphere didn't show up?
    Virtzilla's flagship was hard to find in SFO, but is coming along nicely
    VMworld 2014 A hypothetical VMworld 2014 attendee utterly unfamiliar with VMware could conceivably have emerged from the event unaware that the company's flagship product is called vSphere.…







  • HP busts out new ProLiant Gen9 servers
    Think those are cool? Wait till you get a load of our racks
    Hewlett-Packard has announced the first in a series of new Gen9 servers, racks and blades it reckons turn HP’s existing designs on their head.…






  • All-flash array shipper Violin plays concerto after re-stringing
    Cuts its losses - literally
    +Comment Violin CEO Kevin DeNuccio has cut the flash array shipper's losses to a fraction of what they were in their previous results, and grown revenue over the previous quarter. It’s still lower than a year ago, but a landmark for all that. Violin is no longer on the road to perdition.…


  • IBM: OK, Watson, you've won Jeopardy. Now, CURE CANCER
    Uber-computer to analyse reams of research
    IBM has found yet another use for its Jeopardy-winning Watson supercomputer, launching a new system called Watson Discovery Advisor to analyse scientific and medical research.…


  • Racing Post escapes ICO fine after leaking info of 677K punters
    Stewards' inquiry faults unsaddled website
    UK sports-betting newspaper the Racing Post has received a stern warning – but not a fine – after it emerged that it had aired the private details of more than 677,000 customers as the result of a security breach last year.…



  • Groupon sales reps' overtime pay suit not eligible for class action
    Judge reckons their jobs were too different to be lumped into one court case
    Groupon sales staff have failed to get class action status for their lawsuit against the firm, which accuses the voucher bazaar of not bothering to pay them for overtime before and after its 2011 IPO.…





Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM