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  • Red Hat: 2014:1658-01: java-1.6.0-sun: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated java-1.6.0-sun packages that fix several security issues are now available for Oracle Java for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5, 6, and 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Important security [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:1657-01: java-1.7.0-oracle: Critical Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated java-1.7.0-oracle packages that fix several security issues are now available for Oracle Java for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5, 6, and 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Critical security [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:1655-01: libxml2: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated libxml2 packages that fix one security issue are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Moderate security [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:1654-01: rsyslog7: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated rsyslog7 packages that fix one security issue are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Important security [More...]




  • Red Hat: 2014:1652-01: openssl: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated openssl packages that contain a backported patch to mitigate the CVE-2014-3566 issue and fix two security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7. [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:1653-01: openssl: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated openssl packages that contain a backported patch to mitigate the CVE-2014-3566 issue are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Moderate security [More...]



  • Red Hat: 2014:1648-01: flash-plugin: Critical Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An updated Adobe Flash Player package that fixes multiple security issues is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 and 6 Supplementary. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Critical security [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:1647-01: thunderbird: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An updated thunderbird package that fixes multiple security issues is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 and 6. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Important security [More...]


  • HandyLinux 1.7 Screenshot Tour
    Announcing the release of HandyLinux 1.7, a novice-friendly distribution that features an intuitive start menu with application launchers and Internet bookmarks - based on the stable Debian GNU/Linux 7.0. The HandyMenu application, the distribution's main feature, has been upgraded to version 2.3; it sees the Facebook button is gone, replaced by a link to Framasoft's free services. Some of the other items in the changelog include: redesign of the browser's start page; addition of gpart and Yelp; clean-up of documentation files; addition of "social launchers" for direct access to popular social sites; addition of the Diaspora launcher; software updates to Debian 7.7.



  • Tails 1.2 : Video Review and Screenshot Tours
    Tails 1.2 is released and announced by Tails developers bring with new feature and improvement. As we know, Tails is a live linux distribution based on debian and focused to preserve your privacy and anonymity. It helps you to use the Internet anonymously and circumvent censorship almost anywhere you go and on any computer but leaving no trace unless you ask it to explicitly.


  • PeaZip 5.5 Overview & Ubuntu Installation
    The latest version of PeaZip, release 5.5, a powerful, open-source file archiver and compression tool, shipped today with new features for the backend, the file manager, and the extraction and archiving tools.


  • Nifty Free Image Viewers
    There are so many image viewers that are available for Linux that it can make selection difficult. Here's a small selection and a review of each.



  • Organizer Confirms Both POSSCON and ‘Great Wide Open’ in 2015
    As it turns out, neither rumor was correct. A few days back, Todd Lewis, the Executive Director-Columbia for IT-oLogy, told FOSS Force that both events are very much on the slate for 2015. “We’ll be doing POSSCON and Great Wide Open in 2015,” he wrote in an email. “We’ll announce dates at All Things Open [(ATO), another open source conference hosted by IT-oLogy] and both will take place in the spring. The Call for Speakers for both events will be open and we encourage anyone with an interest to submit a talk and participate.”



  • Torvalds CONFESSES: 'I'm pretty good at alienating devs'
    Linux Lord Linus Torvalds has admitted that his tendency to use strong language has alienated other members of the Linux community. In a Q&A with Intel's chief Linux and open source chap Dirk Hohndel at LinuxCon Europe in Düsseldorf on Wednesday, Torvalds was asked what he'd do differently if given the chance.


  • Open source moves from accepted to expected
    Dwight Merriman is executive chairman and co-founder of MongoDB, an open source document database. Prior to MongoDB, Dwight was co-founder of DoubleClick and Panther Express (CDNetworks). He will give a keynote at the upcoming All Things Open conference in Raleigh this year. In this interview, I asked him a few questions about open source, MongoDB's business model, the challenges of hiring developers, and more. Dwight discusses open source and how it has moved from being accepted to expected.


  • Send video to Chromecast or Roku with Firefox for Android
    Mozilla adds a new feature to the overlooked Firefox mobile browser that allows you to play any web video on a compatible device. Interconnected devices are becoming more and more ubiquitous, with TV-connected devices such as Chromecast being easily controlled from any phone, tablet or computer with a Chrome browser installed. This remote play feature is now being made available for Firefox on Android, similar to YouTube remote play.


  • CAINE 6 “Dark Matter” review
    CAINE 6 uses an installation application called systemback and is the first CAINE installer that I could not use. No matter where I tried to install CAINE 6, systemback failed to start.



  • Mobile pico projector does surround sound too
    A mobile, Android A/V robot on Kickstarter called the “Keecker” offers surround sound, a pico projector, a panoramic camera, sensors, and 1TB of storage. The word “robot” is never used on the Keecker Kickstarter page, but the device rolls around like other household bots. The Keecker navigates with the help of smartphone instructions, as well […]


  • Open source drones, open source in Europe, and more
    In this week's edition of our open source news roundup, we take a look at open source in Europe, Adobe dropping support for Linux, open source drones, and more!Open source news for your reading pleasure.October 11 - 17, 2014read more


  • Open Source Women, Preinstalled Linux & the SF Giants
    Glaringly left out, of course, is one of the better Linux hardware makers, ZaReason, a long-time FOSS manufacturer of a wide range of hardware, from tablets to servers. Truth in advertising: I have a long history of using ZaReason hardware, and every laptop and desktop that I’ve had — whether for review or purchase — has been outstanding. The laptop I once used on a daily basis was absconded by my teenage daughter, who now puts the hardware through some pretty rigorous paces for an out-of-production model (an Alto 3880).



  • Nintendo Bricks Wii U Consoles Unless Owners Agree To New EULA
    Nintendo: it protects what it believes it owns with great vigor. The company has rarely missed an opportunity to make sure that other people are not allowed to alter or mess with the stuff Nintendo insists is Nintendo's. In an apparent effort to maximize the irony combo-meter, Nintendo also has been known to make sure that customers don't mess with or alter the properties those customers actually own, such as online support for games that Nintendo decided to alter long after purchase... just because.But the cold grip of Nintendo's control over its customers' property is apparently no longer limited to games. Nintendo recently released an update for the Wii U that forces you to "agree" to a new end-user license agreement, or else it simply bricks the console altogether.




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  • 'Hi, Folks'
    How a once-friendly, neighborly word — "folks " — became a quiet sort of insult.


  • How Facebook Is Wrecking Political News
    It’s almost impossible to overstate how important Facebook is to online news sites, which live and die at the whims of the social network’s algorithm. With the 2014 midterm elections racing to the Nov. 4 finish line, however, this imbalance of power has become downright dangerous.





  • Does The Culture Of Tipping Make Waitresses More Vulnerable To Sexual Harassment?
    “I know I should have my dignity, this is a professional job, I shouldn’t really have to whore myself out. But if he’s buying 12-year-old whiskey, it could be a very precarious situation. If I say ‘Hey, treat me with respect,’ and he says, ‘What a bitch, I’m just not going to tip her,’ … you lose all of your money.”


  • Watching 'Dear White People' At Harvard
    "Dear White People" follows four black students at a prestigious, majority-white college, where racial tensions are threatening to bring chaos to campus. So why not catch a screening at Harvard?






  • The Origins Of My Pyromania
    I did most of my fire-lighting in the bathroom, operating under the theory that bathroom tile wasn’t flammable. The first time I lit a match and sprayed the tiny flame with Aqua Net, the ensuing fireball was so big and breathtaking that I felt satisfied — and only a little afraid.



  • Bias In The Box
    For capital juries across America, race still plays a role in who gets to serve.


  • Hero Saves Man From Burning Home
    A duplex in Fresno caught fire on Saturday morning trapping a man inside. Watch as one man decided take action and run into the blaze.





  • 11 Beautiful Minutes Of Dogs Pretending To Be Supreme Court Justices
    "Last Week Tonight" did something wonderful Sunday night. John Oliver and his crew released almost 11 minutes of footage of dogs dressed up as the members of the Supreme Court of the United States for news outlets to use for reenactment purposes. Who needs cameras in the courtroom when we've got these cute pups?





  • Serena Williams Fires Back Against 'Sexist,' 'Racist' Comments
    Serena Williams says comments by the head of the Russian Tennis Federation referring to her and older sister Venus as "brothers" were bullying, sexist and racist, and that she supported the one-year suspension imposed by the WTA against the official.








  • The Dutch Boy Mopping Up A Sea Of Plastic
    Boyan Slat is a 20-year-old on a mission — to rid the world's oceans of floating plastic. He has dedicated his teenage years to finding a way of collecting it. But can the system really work — and is there any point when so much new plastic waste is still flowing into the sea every day?


  • What The World Eats
    Did you know that Chinese consumers eat more meat, by calories, than Americans? Break down how nations chow down.


  • 'SimCity' That I Used To Know
    "SimCity," the classic PC game that makes mayors out of middle schoolers, turned 25 last week. Well, actually that’s a common misconception  —  the IBM version of "SimCity" was released in October of ‘89, but the original came out in February. I found this out from Will Wright, the game design guru behind "SimCity" and the genre of games it spawned, whose mental history of the legendary game is far more accurate than the Internet’s. “I think everybody just puts too much trust in Wikipedia,” he said.


  • Homer's Last Theorem
    A look into the deep, dark, strangely complicated world of "Simpsons" mathematics.



  • Watch Live As A Mountain-Sized Comet Zooms By Mars
    To impress upon you the importance of this occasion, an event like this has never taken place in the course of human history, and it's possible that we'll never see something like it again for a very long time.



  • What It's Like To Be Stoned At The Grocery Store
    You know how they say don't shop when you're hungry? You probably shouldn't do it while you're stoned either. Additionally, we're pleasantly surprised with BuzzFeed's foray into sketch comedy.


  • Why Athletes Thank God
    Dismiss their heavenly gratitude if you must, but their motives may be less transparent and more purposeful than you realize.



  • When Women Stopped Coding
    ​Mark Zuckerberg. Bill Gates. Steve Jobs. Most of the big names in technology are men. But a lot of computing pioneers, the ones who programmed the first digital computers, were women. And for decades, the number of women in computer science was growing. But in 1984, something changed. The number of women in computer science flattened, and then plunged.




  • The Largest Ship In the World Is Being Built In Korea
    HughPickens.com writes Alastair Philip Wiper writes that at 194 feet wide and 1,312 feet long, the Matz Maersk Triple E is the largest ship ever built, capable of carrying 18,000 20-foot containers. Its propellers weigh 70 tons apiece and it is too big for the Panama Canal, though it can shimmy through the Suez. A U-shaped hull design allows more room below deck, providing capacity for 18,000 shipping containers arranged in 23 rows – enough space to transport 864 million bananas. The Triple-E is constructed from 425 pre-fabricated segments, making up 21 giant "megablock" cross sections. Most of the 955,250 liters of paint used on each ship is in the form of an anti- corrosive epoxy, pre-applied to each block. Finally, a polyurethane topcoat of the proprietary Maersk brand color "Hardtop AS-Blue 504" is sprayed on. Twenty Triple-E class container ships have been commissioned by Danish shipping company Maersk Lines for delivery by 2015. The ships are being built at the Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering factory in the South Korean port of Opko. The shipyard, about an hour from Busan in the south of the country, employs about 46,000 people, and "could reasonably be described as the worlds biggest Legoland," writes Wiper. "Smiling workers cycle around the huge shipyard as massive, abstractly over proportioned chunks of ships are craned around and set into place." The Triple E is just one small part of the output of the shipyard, as around 100 other vessels including oil rigs are in various stages of completion at the any time." The vessels will serve ports along the northern-Europe-to-Asia route, many of which have had to expand to cope with the ships' size. "You don't feel like you're inside a boat, it's more like a cathedral," Wiper says. "Imagine this space being full of consumer goods, and think about how many there are on just one ship. Then think about how many are sailing round the world every day. It's like trying to think about infinity."







  • Ask Slashdot: LTE Hotspot As Sole Cellular Connection?
    New submitter iamacat writes I am thinking of canceling my regular voice plan and using an LTE hotspot for all my voice and data needs. One big draw is ability to easily use multiple devices without expensive additional lines or constantly swapping SIMs. So I can have an ultra compact Android phone and an iPod touch and operate whichever has the apps I feel like using. Or, if I anticipate needing more screen real estate, I can bring only a Nexus 7 or a laptop and still be able to make and receive VoIP calls. When I am home or at work, I would be within range of regular WiFi and not need to eat into the data plan or battery life of the hotspot. Has anyone done something similar? Did the setup work well? Which devices and VoIP services did you end up using? How about software for automatic WiFi handoffs between the hotspot and regular home/work networks?







  • The Woman Who Should Have Been the First Female Astronaut
    StartsWithABang writes We like to think of the Mercury 7 — the very first group of NASA astronauts — as the "best of the best," having been chosen from a pool of over 500 of the top military test pilots after three rounds of intense physical and mental tests. Yet when women were allowed to take the same tests, one of them clearly distinguished herself, outperforming practically all of the men. If NASA had really believed in merit, Jerrie Cobb would have been the first female in space, even before Valentina Tereshkova, more than 50 years ago. She still deserves to go.







  • 3-D Printed "Iron Man" Prosthetic Hands Now Available For Kids
    PC World (drawing on an article from 3DPrint.com) notes that inventor Pat Starace has released his plans for a 3-D printable prosthetic hand designed to appeal both to kids who need it and their parents (who can't all afford the cost of conventional prostheses). The hand "has the familiar gold-and-crimson color scheme favored by Ol' Shellhead, and it's designed with housings for a working gyroscope, magnetometer, accelerometer, and other "cool sensors", as well as a battery housing and room for a low-power Bluetooth chip and charging port." It takes about 48 hours in printing time (and "a lot" of support material), but the result is inexpensive and functional.







  • If You're Connected, Apple Collects Your Data
    fyngyrz (762201) writes It would seem that no matter how you configure Yosemite, Apple is listening. Keeping in mind that this is only what's been discovered so far, and given what's known to be going on, it's not unthinkable that more is as well. Should users just sit back and accept this as the new normal? It will be interesting to see if these discoveries result in an outcry, or not. Is it worse than the data collection recently reported in a test version of Windows?







  • In UK, Internet Trolls Could Face Two Years In Jail
    An anonymous reader writes with this news from The Guardian about a proposed change in UK law that would greatly increase the penalties for online incivility: Internet trolls who spread "venom" on social media could be jailed for up to two years, the justice secretary Chris Grayling has said as he announced plans to quadruple the maximum prison sentence. Grayling, who spoke of a "baying cybermob", said the changes will allow magistrates to pass on the most serious cases to crown courts. The changes, which will be introduced as amendments to the criminal justice and courts bill, will mean the maximum custodial sentence of six months will be increased to 24 months. Grayling told the Mail on Sunday: "These internet trolls are cowards who are poisoning our national life. No one would permit such venom in person, so there should be no place for it on social media. That is why we are determined to quadruple the six-month sentence.







  • Gigabit Cellular Networks Could Happen, With 24GHz Spectrum
    An anonymous reader writes A Notice of Inquiry was issued by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) on Friday that focuses research on higher frequencies for sending gigabit streams of mobile data. The inquiry specifically states that its purpose is to determine "what frequency bands above 24 GHz would be most suitable for mobile services, and to begin developing a record on mobile service rules and a licensing framework for mobile services in those bands". Cellular networks currently use frequencies between 600 MHz to 3 GHz with the most desirable frequencies under 1 GHz being owned by AT&T and Verizon Wireless. The FCC feels, however, that new technology indicates the potential for utilizing higher frequency ranges not necessarily as a replacement but as the implementation necessary to finally usher in 5G wireless technology. The FCC anticipates the advent of 5G commercial offerings within six years.







  • Soda Pop Damages Your Cells' Telomeres
    BarbaraHudson writes Those free soft drinks at your last start-up may come with a huge hidden price tag. The Toronto Sun reports that researchers at the University of California — San Francisco found study participants who drank pop daily had shorter telomeres — the protective units of DNA that cap the ends of chromosomes in cells — in white blood cells. Short telomeres have been associated with chronic aging diseases such as heart disease, diabetes and some forms of cancer. The researchers calculated daily consumption of a 20-ounce pop is associated with 4.6 years of additional biological aging. The effect on telomere length is comparable to that of smoking, they said. "This finding held regardless of age, race, income and education level," researcher Elissa Epel said in a press release.







  • NASA Cancels "Sunjammer" Solar Sail Demonstration Mission
    An anonymous reader writes "Space News reports that NASA has cancelled its solar sail demonstration mission (also known as Sunjammer) citing "a lack of confidence in its contractor's ability to deliver." "Company president Nathan] Barnes said that in 2011 he reached out to several NASA centers and companies that he believed could build the spacecraft and leave L'Garde free to focus on the solar sail. None of those he approached — he only identified NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California — took him up on the offer. Rather than give up on the opportunity to land a NASA contract, L'Garde decided to bring the spacecraft development in house. It did not work out, and as of Oct. 17, the company had taken delivery of about $2 million worth of spacecraft hardware including a hydrazine tank from ATK Space Systems of Commerce, California, and four mono-propellant thrusters from Aerojet Rocketdyne of Sacramento, California."







  • Brain Patterns Give Clues To Why Some People Just Keep Gambling
    Research from several UK universities, as reported by Time, indicates that the brain activity of compulsive gamblers shows a marked difference in response to pleasure-triggering behavior, which may help explain why they have trouble stopping: [The participants] took an amphetamine capsule, which unleashes endorphins with similar effects to the rush you get from exercise or alcohol, the study says. An additional PET scan revealed that pathological gamblers responded differently to the drug. They released fewer endorphins than those who didn't gamble, and they also reported lower levels of euphoria on a questionnaire afterward. This might help explain the addictive part of pathological gambling: to get pleasure from the act, problem gamblers might need more of it or to work harder for it.







  • Watch Comet Siding Spring's Mars Fly-By, Live
    From the L.A. Times, and with enough time to tune in, comes this tip: Comet Siding Spring's closest approach to the red planet will occur at 11:27 a.m. [Pacific Time] on Sunday. At its closest approach, the comet will come within 87,000 miles of Mars. That's 10 times closer than any comet on record has ever come to Earth. Sadly, this historic flyby is not visible to the naked eye. People who live in the Southern Hemisphere have a shot at seeing the comet if they have access to a good telescope six inches or wider. However, most of us in the Northern Hemisphere will not be able to see the comet at all, experts say, no matter how big a telescope we've got. Here to save the cometary day is astronomy website Slooh.com. Beginning at 11:15 a.m PDT on Sunday, it will host a live broadcast of the comet's closest approach to Mars, as seen by the website's telescopes in South Africa and in the Canary Islands. Later in the day, beginning at 5:30 p.m. PDT, Slooh will broadcast another view of the comet from a telescope in Chile.







  • Ask Slashdot: Good Hosting Service For a Parody Site?
    An anonymous reader writes "Ok, bear with me now. I know this is not PC Mag 2014 review of hosting services. I am thinking of getting a parody website up. I am mildly concerned about potential reaction of the parodee, who has been known to be a little heavy handed when it comes to things like that. In short, I want to make sure that the hosting company won't flake out just because of potential complaints. I checked some companies and their TOS and AUPs all seem to have weird-ass restrictions (Arvixe, for example, has a list of unacceptable material that happens to list RPGs and MUDS ). I live in U.S.; parodee in Poland. What would you recommend?"







  • No More Lee-Enfield: Canada's Rangers To Get a Tech Upgrade
    ControlsGeek writes The Lee-Enfield .303 rifle is being phased out for use by the Canadian Rangers, a Northern aboriginal branch of the Armed Forces. The rifle has been in service with the Canadian military for 100 years and is still being used by the Rangers for its unfailing reliability in Arctic conditions. If only the hardware that we use in computers could have such a track record. The wheels turn slowly, though, and it's not clear what kind of gun will replace the Enfields.







  • Apple Doesn't Design For Yesterday
    HughPickens.com writes Erik Karjaluoto writes that he recently installed OS X Yosemite and his initial reaction was "This got hit by the ugly stick." But Karjaluoto says that Apple's decision to make a wholesale shift from Lucida to Helvetica defies his expectations and wondered why Apple would make a change that impedes legibility, requires more screen space, and makes the GUI appear fuzzy? The Answer: Tomorrow. Microsoft's approach with Windows, and backward compatibility in general, is commendable. "Users can install new versions of this OS on old machines, sometimes built on a mishmash of components, and still have it work well. This is a remarkable feat of engineering. It also comes with limitations — as it forces Microsoft to operate in the past." But Apple doesn't share this focus on interoperability or legacy. "They restrict hardware options, so they can build around a smaller number of specs. Old hardware is often left behind (turn on a first-generation iPad, and witness the sluggishness). Meanwhile, dying conventions are proactively euthanized," says Karjaluoto. "When Macs no longer shipped with floppy drives, many felt baffled. This same experience occurred when a disk (CD/DVD) reader no longer came standard." In spite of the grumblings of many, Karjaluoto doesn't recall many such changes that we didn't later look upon as the right choice.







  • Be True To Your CS School: LinkedIn Ranks US Schools For Job-Seeking Programmers
    theodp writes "The Motley Fool reports that the Data Scientists at LinkedIn have been playing with their Big Data, ranking schools based on how successful recent grads have been at landing desirable software development jobs. Here's their Top 25: CMU, Caltech, Cornell, MIT, Princeton, Berkeley, Univ. of Washington, Duke, Michigan, Stanford, UCLA, Illinois, UT Austin, Brown, UCSD, Harvard, Rice, Penn, Univ. of Arizona, Harvey Mudd, UT Dallas, San Jose State, USC, Washington University, RIT. There's also a shorter list for the best schools for software developers at startups, which draws a dozen schools from the previously mentioned schools, and adds Columbia, Univ. of Virginia, and Univ. of Maryland College Park. If you're in a position to actually hire new graduates, how much do you care about applicants' alma maters?







  • BBC Takes a Stand For the Public's Right To Remember Redacted Links
    Martin Spamer writes with word that the BBC is to publish a continually updated list of its articles removed from Google under the controversial 'right to be forgotten' notices." The BBC will begin - in the "next few weeks" - publishing the list of removed URLs it has been notified about by Google. [Editorial policy head David] Jordan said the BBC had so far been notified of 46 links to articles that had been removed. They included a link to a blog post by Economics Editor Robert Peston. The request was believed to have been made by a person who had left a comment underneath the article. An EU spokesman later said the removal was "not a good judgement" by Google.







  • Canada Will Ship 800 Doses of Experimental Ebola Drug to WHO
    The WSJ reports that 800 doses of an experimental vaccine for Ebola, developed over a decade at Public Health Agency of Canada’s main laboratory in Winnipeg, will be shipped to the World Health Organization in an effort to help fight the ongoing Ebola crisis in West Africa: The vaccine will be shipped by air from Winnipeg, Manitoba, to the University Hospital of Geneva via specialized courier. The vials will be sent in three separate shipments as a precautionary measure, due to the challenges in moving a vaccine that must kept at a very low temperature at all times. ... The vaccine had shown “very promising results in animal research” and earlier this week, Ottawa announced the start of clinical trials on humans at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research in the U.S. ... The government has licensed NewLink Genetics Corp. , of the U.S., through its wholly owned subsidiary BioProtection Systems Corp. to further develop the vaccine for use in humans. The government owns the intellectual property rights associated with the vaccine.







  • Despite Patent Settlement, Apple Pulls Bose Merchandise From Its Stores
    Apple has long sold Bose headphones and speakers in its retail stores, including in the time since it acquired Bose-competitor Beats Audio, and despite the lawsuit filed by Bose against Apple alleging patent violations on the part of Beats. That's come to an end this week, though: Apple's dropped Bose merchandise both in its retail locations and online, despite recent news that the two companies have settled the patent suit.







  • iFixit Tears Apart Apple's Shiny New Retina iMac
    iFixit gives the new Retina iMac a score of 5 (out of 10) for repairability, and says that the new all-in-one is very little changed internally from the system (non-Retina) it succeeds. A few discoveries along the way: The new model "retains the familiar, easily accessible RAM upgrade slot from iMacs of yore"; the display panel (the one iin the machine disassmbled by iFixit at least) was manufactured by LG Display; except for that new display, "the hardware inside the iMac Intel 27" Retina 5K Display looks much the same as last year's 27" iMac." In typical iFixit style, the teardown is documented with high-resolution pictures and more technical details.







  • Robot SmackDowns Wants To Bring Robot Death Matches To an Arena Near You
    Business Insider profiles Andrew Stroup, Gui Cavalcanti and Matt Oehrlein, who are trying to get off the ground a robot competition league, called Robot SmackDowns. The idea, as you might guess from the name, is to showcase violence and drama to draw on the crowd-appeal of wrestling, NASCAR, and monster truck rallies: this is definitely not Dean Kamen's FIRST — it's giant mechanical beasts shooting at and otherwise trying to destroy each other. And it's not quite right to call them robots in the usual sense; they're more like mecha: "In a MegaBots battle, a two-member team sits inside the bot's upper torso, where the controls systems are housed. Although the co-founders assure me that the pilot and gunner are well protected inside, the situation presents a heightened suspense. Each 15,000-pound robot is equipped with six-inch cannons inside its arms that fire paint-filled missiles and cannon balls at 120 miles per hour. Good aim can cause enough damage to jam its opponent's weapons system or shoot off a limb." They'll be launching a Kickstarter campaign soon; according to the article, "Assuming it raises enough money to build a fleet, [the company's] plan is to take the bots on the road. They will tour the country, face off in epic battles against other MegaBots, and build a fan base. Stroup says (without giving specifics) networks have reached out and will closely watch how MegaBot, Inc.'s upcoming Kickstarter campaign performs. The possibilities for distribution seem endless, though the team is tight-lipped about the exact direction it's headed."







  • JavaScript and the Netflix User Interface
    CowboyRobot writes Alex Liu is a senior UI engineer at Netflix and part of the core team leading the migration of Netflix.com to Node.js. He has an article at ACM's Queue in which he describes how JavaScript is used at Netflix. "With increasingly more application logic being shifted to the browser, developers have begun to push the boundaries of what JavaScript was originally intended for. Entire desktop applications are now being rebuilt entirely in JavaScript—the Google Docs office suite is one example. Such large applications require creative solutions to manage the complexity of loading the required JavaScript files and their dependencies. The problem can be compounded when introducing multivariate A/B testing, a concept that is at the core of the Netflix DNA. Multivariate testing introduces a number of problems that JavaScript cannot handle using native constructs, one of which is the focus of this article: managing conditional dependencies."







  • Snapchat Will Introduce Ads, Attempt To Keep Them Other Than Creepy
    As reported by VentureBeat, dissapearing-message service Snapchat is introducing ads. Considering how most people feel about ads, they're trying to ease them in gently: "Ads can be ignored: Users will not be required to watch them. If you do view an ad, or if you ignore it for 24 hours, it will disappear just like Stories do." Hard to say how much it will mollify the service's users, but the company says "We won’t put advertisements in your personal communication – things like Snaps or Chats. That would be totally rude. We want to see if we can deliver an experience that’s fun and informative, the way ads used to be, before they got creepy and targeted."







  • Florida Supreme Court: Police Can't Grab Cell Tower Data Without a Warrant
    SternisheFan writes with an excerpt from Wired with some (state-specific, but encouraging) news about how much latitude police are given to track you based on signals like wireless transmissions. The Florida Supreme Court ruled Thursday that obtaining cell phone location data to track a person's location or movement in real time constitutes a Fourth Amendment search and therefore requires a court-ordered warrant. The case specifically involves cell tower data for a convicted drug dealer that police obtained from a telecom without a warrant. But the way the ruling is written (.pdf), it would also cover the use of so-called "stingrays" — sophisticated technology law enforcement agencies use to locate and track people in the field without assistance from telecoms. Agencies around the country, including in Florida, have been using the technology to track suspects — sometimes without obtaining a court order, other times deliberately deceiving judges and defendants about their use of the devices to track suspects, telling judges the information came from "confidential" sources rather than disclose their use of stingrays. The new ruling would require them to obtain a warrant or stop using the devices. The American Civil Liberties Union calls the Florida ruling "a resounding defense" of the public's right to privacy.







  • Apple's Next Hit Could Be a Microsoft Surface Pro Clone
    theodp writes "Good artists copy, great artists steal," Steve Jobs used to say. Having launched a perfectly-timed attack against Samsung and phablets with its iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, Leonid Bershidsky suggests that the next big thing from Apple will be a tablet-laptop a la Microsoft's Surface Pro 3. "Before yesterday's Apple [iPad] event," writes Bershidsky, "rumors were strong of an upcoming giant iPad, to be called iPad Pro or iPad Plus. There were even leaked pictures of a device with a 12.9-inch screen, bigger than the Surface Pro's 12-inch one. It didn't come this time, but it will. I've been expecting a touch-screen Apple laptop for a few years now, and keep being wrong.







  • Ask Slashdot: Stop PulseAudio From Changing Sound Settings?
    New submitter cgdae writes Does anyone know how to stop PulseAudio/Pavucontrol from changing sound settings whenever there is a hardware change such as headphones being plugged in/out or docking/undocking my laptop ? I recently had to install PulseAudio on my Debian system because the Linux version of Skype started to require it. Ever since, whenever i dock/undock or use/stop using headphones, all sound disappears, and i have to go to Pavucontrol and make random changes to its 'Output Devices' or 'Speakers' or 'Headphones' tab, or mute/unmute things, or drag a volume slider which has inexplicably moved to nearly zero, until sound magically comes back again. I've tried creating empty PulseAudio config files in my home directory, and/or disabling the loading of various PulseAudio modules in /etc/pulse/*.conf, but i cannot stop PulseAudio from messing things up whenever there's a hardware change. It's really frustrating that something like PulseAudio doesn't have an easy-to-find way of preventing it from trying (and failing) to be clever. [In case it's relevant, my system is a Lenovo X220 laptop, with Debian jessie, kernel 3.14-2-amd64. I run fvwm with an ancient config.]







  • Xperia Z3: Crikey, Sony – ANOTHER flagship phondleslab?
    The Fourth Amendment... and it IS better
    Review The decisions that must be going on at Sony’s mobile R&D division are certainly intriguing, if not baffling. Six months after it was launched, the Xperia Z2 has been replaced by the Z3 and barely nine months after it was launched, the Z1 Compact has been replaced by the Z3 Compact (there wasn’t a Z2 Compact, so don’t panic).…



  • The 'fun-nification' of computer education – good idea?
    Compulsory code schools, luvvies love it, but what about Maths and Physics?
    Battle of Ideas The idea that computer programming should be compulsory in schools is hugely popular with metropolitan media luvvies and quango-hoppers - but serious questions were raised by people who do it and teach it this weekend.…



  • Violin: Don't weep for Tier 1 storage... it'll soon be flashtastic
    CEO: Scale-out hyper-converged systems? Pah!
    Comment Flash will replace all enterprise tier 1 storage, and shared arrays will prevail over server-side SANs, while network latency remains a solvable computer science problem, argues Violin Memory CEO Kevin DeNuccio.…


  • Hey, iPhone 6 fanbois: Apple's bonk to 'Pay' app is GO
    Scrump up the sales volume
    Apple will open up its new bonk-to-pay system to its newest phones, the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, today, with fanbois able to bonk shiny-shinys to purchase stuff online or at 220,000 stores.…




  • Twitter 'news' spreads faster than Ebola #FakeCures #Malware
    Security watchers warn to brace for scams
    Social media has become a conduit for the spread of fake cures and treatments for Ebola. As if that weren't bad enough, confusion about the epidemic is also being harnessed to push malware and other cybercrime scams, security watchers warn.…


  • Police stats inflate the number of guns actually stolen in Blighty
    Guns, or objects licensed as guns? Big difference between the two
    Analysis The Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) has claimed that more legally owned firearms were lost or stolen over the last few years than appears to be the case, according to an exclusive analysis by The Register.…






  • Visual voicemail hack makes your messages a snack
    Rate limiter patch is a fun MEELLION-user DoS banhammer
    Ruxcon Sydney penetration tester Shubham 'Shubs' Shah has urged US and European researchers to probe their telco's voicemail security after he found accounts held by local telcos Vodafone and Optus were open to attack.…


  • Microsoft pulls another dodgy patch
    Redmond makes a hash of hashing add-on
    Another Patch Update Tuesday, another red face for Microsoft, which has again been forced to pull a patch to prevent nasty side-effects.…


  • 'LulzSec leader Aush0k' found to be naughty boy not worthy of jail
    15 months home detention leaves egg on feds' faces as they grab for more power
    The man that Australia's Federal Police once described as "a self-proclaimed leader of the group ‘Lulz Security’ (Lulzsec) has been sentenced to 15 months of home detention, after a local magistrate decided he was just a very naughty boy.…



  • FCC, Google cast eye over millimetre wireless
    The smaller the wave, the bigger 5G's chances of success
    The US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is firing up an investigation into millimetre-wave frequency spectrum allocations, and Google has filed an application to fool around with the same band.…


  • Oz privacy comish says breaches could double this year
    Åustralian outfits have already 'fessed up to sixty breaches since March 2014
    The office of Australia's Federal Privacy Commissioner has received 60 voluntary data breach notifications in the six months since 12 March compared to 71 received in the 2014 financial year.…



  • ICT ministers mark out net-regulation patch ahead of ITU plenipot
    Busan Declaration looks like a statement of intent
    The ITU has kicked off three weeks of wrangling over the future of the Internet – the 2014 Plenipotentiary – with a ministerial statement that's likely to spark concerns about the direction of the coming summit.…


  • WAITER! There's a Flappy Bird in my Lollipop!
    New Android release includes frustrating, derivative, Easter Egg
    Google's practice of leaving Easter Eggs in Android appears to have continued, with a chap spotting a Flappy Bird clone in the new version 5.0, aka Lollipop, release.…


  • FIRST standards to clean up messy CERTs
    Sharing is caring, but not for Blighty
    The global gathering of incident responders FIRST is spearheading a global standards effort to reform and unify the operations of government and large enterprise computer emergency response teams (CERTs).…


  • NBN Co adds 'burbs to copper map, claims 'speed up' rollout
    140 lucky locations won't get fibre
    NBN Co has re-designated 140 suburbs from fibre-to-the-premises to fibre-to-the-node, a move it says will deliver high-speed connections to the target locations earlier than would otherwise have been a case.…


  • Human spaceships dodge COMET debris pelting off Mars
    Odyssey orbiter yet to report, though, comet's trailing trash poses new threat
    Comet Siding Spring has passed the Red Planet, apparently without incident to the various human machines in the neighbourhood of the ochre orb.…


  • Austrian telco trials G.fast as 'interim solution'
    Commercial services planned for 2016, long-term plan calls for fibre
    Telekom Austria is the latest outfit to trumpet the virtues of the yet-to-be-ratified G.fast standard, announcing that a deployment trial conducted with Alcatel-Lucent achieved speeds beyond 100 Mbps per household.…


  • vSphere meets iCylinder in new VMware update
    Virtzilla to support Mac Pro with patches and something called 'vSphere .NEXT'
    VMware has emitted a small update to ESXi that, among other things, adds support for the Mac Pro.…


  • No sail: NASA spikes Sunjammer
    'Solar sail' demonstrator project binned
    Reports are emerging that NASA has decided not to go ahead with next year's Sunjammer mission, which was to demonstrate the use of “solar sail” propulsion.…






  • Are you a gun owner? Let us in OR ELSE, say Blighty's top cops
    Populist campaign goes off at half cock
    Downrange The Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) has announced a legal tweak intended to allow police officers to turn up at the homes of gun owners, without warning, and demand to inspect guns stored on the premises. A new Crimestoppers hotline is also in operation to encourage people to dob in gun owners they suspect of wrongdoing. However, as even the police themselves admit, gun crime is falling.…




  • Space exploration is just so lame. NEW APPS are mankind's future
    We feel obliged to point out the headline statement is total, utter cobblers
    CoTW What's more important: Angry Birds or the Space Shuttle? According to one Register commentard, it's the former. No, really - and yes, it's time for Comment of the Week once again.…


  • Happiness economics is bollocks. Oh, UK.gov just adopted it? Er ...
    Opportunity doesn't knock; it costs us instead
    Worstall @ the Weekend As is ever the case, by the time squares have caught on to the value of whatever hipsters have been doing this week, the latter are off doing something else entirely. Much the same happens with economic fashions: it takes time for those not actually involved in the subject to grok to what the cool kids are saying and by the time they do actually grasp it it's all entirely out of date.…



  • Want a more fuel efficient car? Then redesign it – here's how
    43mpg from a Jaguar XJ-S
    Crawling from the Wreckage Cars are mass-produced consumer products sold to users who mostly know very little about them. They are optimised to make a profit for the manufacturer, so low build cost is paramount for most manufacturers – which automatically excludes many design and engineering ideas that would raise efficiency. John Watkinson has been busy in the garage and applied those concepts to his own vehicle and found that they work.










  • Citizenfour: Poitras' doco is about NSA and GCHQ – NOT Snowden
    Forget the character - concentrate on the PLOT ... against YOUR freedom
    Review There is no subtlety in the political stance of Laura Poitras, which makes Citizenfour a completely one-sided documentary. Yet oddly enough, this bias doesn’t detract from the power of the film that covers a week in a Hong Kong hotel bedroom, during which Edward Snowden reveals himself and the extent of the NSA’s cyber-surveillance to Poitras, Glenn Greenwald and fellow Guardian journalist Ewen MacAskill.…


  • Carry On Cosmonaut: Willful Child is a poor taste Star Trek parody
    Cringeworthy, crude and crass jokes abound in Steven Erikson’s sci-fi debut
    Page File Anyone who’s read Steven Erikson's Malazan Book of the Fallen, a searingly bleak and intricate fantasy series, will be bitterly disappointed with Willful Child (and yes, pedants, that is how he spells it).…


Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM