Recent Changes - Search:
NTLUG

Linux is free.
Life is good.

Linux Training
10am on Meeting Days!

1825 Monetary Lane Suite #104 Carrollton, TX

Do a presentation at NTLUG.

What is the Linux Installation Project?

Real companies using Linux!

Not just for business anymore.

Providing ready to run platforms on Linux

Show Descriptions... (Show All) (Single Column)


  • Red Hat: 2014:0888-01: qemu-kvm-rhev: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated qemu-kvm-rhev packages that fix several security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 3.0 and 4.0. The Red Hat Security Response Team has rated this update as having Moderate [More...]





  • Red Hat: 2014:0939-01: python-django-horizon: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated python-django-horizon packages that fix three security issues, multiple bugs, and add an enhancement are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 5.0 (Icehouse) for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. [More...]








  • The Barnaby Jack Few Knew: Celebrated Hacker Saw Spotlight as 'Necessary Evil'
    When celebrated computer hacker Barnaby Jack died suddenly a year ago at the age of 35, headlines around the world touted the Steve Jobs-style pizazz he brought to cyber-security conferences and his show-stopping stunts such as breaking into ATMs and pacemakers. In hacker circles, he was known as the life of the party.


  • Ubuntu 14.04.1 LTS released
    In today's open source roundup: Canonical releases an update to Ubuntu 14.04. Plus: The NY Times bashes open source for not making enough money, and a review of Deepin 2014.


  • What I Learned from Edward Snowden at the Hacker Conference
    It was 1 PM last Saturday and Edward Snowden was about to be televised. His audience was the crowd at the Hackers On Planet Earth conference, a group of people no one would ever mistake for attendees at a political convention. Amid the sea of black clothing were many unconventional fashion statements: purple bandanas and balloon pants, and tartan kilts, and white robes, and green hair.


  • Program Octave
    Learn how to use Octave shell, program basic Octave scripts, functions, packages and much more...


  • How To Install ownCloud 7 On Ubuntu 14.04
    How To Install ownCloud 7 On Ubuntu 14.04This document describes how to install and configure ownCloud 7 on Ubuntu 14.04. I will also connect to the ownCloud Server's data with another Ubuntu 14.04 Desktop and a Windows 7 machine. ownCloud provides access to your data through a web interface or WebDAV while providing a platform to easily view, sync and share across devices—all under your control. ownCloud’s open architecture is extensible via a simple but powerful API for applications and plugins and works with any storage.


  • Celebrating sysadmins in the cloudy future
    System administration can be a thankless job. To all of the tireless administrators out there who keep the systems we reply upon up and running, today is the day that we say thank you!read more


  • Google devs: Tearing Chrome away from OpenSSL not that easy
    Custom BoringSSL fork not quite a drop-in replacement yetGoogle is trying to migrate its Chrome browser away from the buggy OpenSSL cryptography library toward BoringSSL, its homegrown fork, but swapping out the crypto code is proving more difficult than it sounds.…


  • Security risks posed by smart meters
    In a world of always-on connectivity, Internet of Everything and Internet of Things, where most devices now have an embedded computer, the risk posed by hackers tampering with them cannot be overlooked.



  • How to use awk command in Linux
    Text processing is at the heart of Unix. From pipes to the /proc subsystem, the "everything is a file" philosophy pervades the operating system and all of the tools built for it. Because of this, getting comfortable with text-processing is one of the most important skills for an aspiring Linux system administrator, or even any […]Continue reading...The post How to use awk command in Linux appeared first on Xmodulo.No related FAQ.



  • Nginx Plus r4 Improves Web Server Security
    Nginx Plus is the commercially supported enterprise release of the widely deployed open-source Nginx Web server. According to the June 2014 Netcraft Web Server Survey, Nginx is powering 134 million sites around the world. The first Nginx Plus release debuted back in August 2013, providing users with additional high-availability features on top of the open-source base. New versions of Nginx Plus are now released every three months. The Nginx Plus r4 release is based on the open-source Nginx 1.7.3 release, which was released on July 8.


  • Deepin 2014 review
    Deepin Desktop Environment 2.0, which made its debut on Deepin 2014, is a redesigned version of what shipped in Deepin 2013.


  • How Hackers Hid a Money-Mining Botnet in Amazon's Cloud
    Hackers have long used malware to enslave armies of unwitting PCs, but security researchers Rob Ragan and Oscar Salazar had a different thought: Why steal computing power from innocent victims when there's so much free processing power out there for the taking?


  • Open source education for lifelong learners
    In the world of the Internet, where everything is so easily available, it seems like all technology is a benefit to online learners. For those who aren[he]#039[/he]t able to use the available traditional resources for various reasons, open source technology specifically is a huge boon. Let me share my seven-year journey of using open source and how it helped me add more value to both my personal and professional lives.



  • Keynotes from OSCON 2014 Day 3
    We're back with keynote coverage on Day 3 of OSCON 2014! This comes to you (live stream) from Portland at the Oregon Convention Center.


  • GOG.com announces Linux support with more than fifty games
    In today's open source roundup: GOG.com now supports Linux. Plus: A distrohopper falls in love with Debian and settles down, and a KDE 5 slideshow. It's great to see GOG.com so enthusiastic about Linux gaming. It's yet another indication that Linux gaming is red-hot right now, and I'm glad to note that they have plans to add so many more games soon.


  • Raspberry Pi-based signage player sips 7 Watts
    TinyGreenPC launched a Raspberry Pi and Linux based digital signage player that runs on just 7 Watts, and offers optional WiFi and an OPS interface. The Pi Media Player is one of the most power-efficient signage players on the market, according to TinyGreenPC, a subsidiary of UK-based embedded manufacturer and distributor AndersDX.


  • Firefox 31 available in Fedora
    Mozilla recently released Firefox version 31, and now this updated version of the Fedora default web browser is available for download in Fedora 20.


Error: It's not possible to reach RSS file http://www.newsforge.com/index.rss ...

  • How The Mother Of All Sequels Crashed And Burned
    Ten years ago, Benedict Fitzgerald's screenplay helped turn "The Passion of the Christ"into the most successful independent movie ever made. Later, he wrote a follow-up that he thought could be as big — and so did some drug dealers, money launderers, and kidnappers.


  • Congress Has Passed A Bill Making Phone Unlocking Legal In TheU.S.
    Consumers in the U.S. should soon be able to legally unlock their phones for use on other wireless networks. The House of Representatives unanimously passed a bill this afternoon legalizing cell phone unlocking, followingthe lead of the U.S. Senateearlier this summer.



  • Now You Can Get Digg In A Box
    Do you like Digg? Of course you do, otherwise you wouldn't be reading this. Well now you can get the same kind of great, weird and curious stuff you find on Digg but in real life, delivered right to your door. We don't know what you'll be getting yet, but rest assured it'll be really cool. And if you use the code "DIB5OFF" today it'll be really cool for $5 less. What could go wrong?



  • Portraits Of America’s New Nomads
    There is a loose tribe living at nature’s margins in the United States, slaughtering goats raised by hand at Idaho’s Lost River and picking cherries growing wild in California’s Marble Mountain Wilderness.





  • Google Is Trying To Define The Perfectly Healthy Human
    Called Baseline Study, the project will collect anonymous genetic and molecular information from 175 people — and later thousands more — to create what the company hopes will be the fullest picture of what a healthy human being should be.



  • How To Disarm A Live Mine
    This Cambodian man takes us through the incredibly dangerous task of rendering a mine useless with nothing more than a rifle and a multi-tool. Talk about nerves of steel.











  • New Image Of Ben Affleck As Batman
    The image is part of a 75th anniversary montage of Batman images created for Comic-Con that shows the character’s various representations on film, TV and as games, toys and clothing. Thephotocan be seen at DC’s booth at San Diego Comic-Con.


  • What We Learned This Week
    This week we learned Vegas is changing blackjack, why sleeping in doesn't work and that New York is the unhappiest city in America. Ok, we probably could have guessed that last one.


  • Here's Morgan Freeman On Helium
    Freeman, after some convincing from Fallon, agrees to be interviewed while sucking down a balloon. Spoiler: He sounds like an oompa-loompa.




  • A Global, Interactive Guide To The First World War
    Ten historians from 10 countries give a brief history of the first world war through a global lens. Using original news reports, interactive maps and rarely-seen footage, including extraordinary scenes of troops crossing Mesopotamia on camels and Italian soldiers fighting high up in the Alps, the half-hour film explores the war and its effects from many different perspectives.


  • Arctic Man
    Wild rides and crazed nights at America's most extreme ski race.


  • ISIS Blows Up Jonah's Tomb
    ISIS militants in Iraq have destroyed what is thought to be the burial site of the prophet Jonah. In a video spread widely on the Internet, ISIS appears to have blown up the tomb built for the man who many Jews, Christians and Muslims believe was swallowed by a whale. The Al Qaeda splinter group has made a habit of destroying important religious sites they deem counter to their fundamentalist beliefs.


  • There's A Cthulhu-Based Cryptocurrency Now
    Written in the voodoo cultspeak of futurist horror writer H.P. Lovecraft's short story, "The Call of Cthulhu," the creepy Cthulhu Offerings may be the most confusing digital currency yet.





  • The Down And Dirty History Of TMZ
    How a lawyer from the San Fernando Valley created a gossip empire and transformed himself into the most feared man in Hollywood, all by breaking a few long-held rules and lording over a notorious vault full of secrets.



  • Israeli Strike Kills A Leader Of Islamic Jihad
    Islamic Jihad said that Salah Abu Hassanein — a spokesman for its militia, Al-Quds Brigades — and his sons, aged 15 and 12, were killed at their home in the southern city of Rafah.


  • Crunch Time For Gaza Truce Talks As Death Toll Passes 800
    U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry pressed regional leaders to nail down a Gaza ceasefire on Friday as the civilian death toll soared, and further violence loomed between Israelis and Palestinians in the occupied West Bank and Jerusalem.




  • America’s Flight 17
    The time the United States blew up a passenger plane — and tried to cover it up.





  • First Day Of Terror
    As six casually dressed young people carrying black Adidas bags turned the corner and began to approach the building, the oil ministers from Saudi Arabia, Iran, Iraq, Venezuela, Libya, and Algeria had begun another round of discussions about the price of oil. Their meetings had been headline material for over two years, since October 1973.






  • 10 Bar Bets You'll Always Win
    You might win these bets, but depending on your watering hole of choice, you might get your smarmy ass tossed out on the curb too.


  • Switching From Microsoft Office To LibreOffice Saves Toulouse 1 Million Euros
    jrepin sends this EU report: The French city of Toulouse saved 1 million euro by migrating all its desktops from Microsoft Office to LibreOffice. This project was rooted in a global digital policy which positions free software as a driver of local economic development and employment. Former IT policy-maker Erwane Monthubert said, "Software licenses for productivity suites cost Toulouse 1.8 million euro every three years. Migration cost us about 800,000 euro, due partly to some developments. One million euro has actually been saved in the first three years. It is a compelling proof in the actual context of local public finance. ... France has a high value in free software at the international level. Every decision-maker should know this."







  • Google Looking To Define a Healthy Human
    rtoz writes: Google's moonshot research division, "Google X," has started "Baseline Study," a project designed to collect anonymous genetic and molecular information from 175 people (and later thousands more) to create a complete picture of what a healthy human being should be. The blueprint will help researchers detect health problems such as heart disease and cancer far earlier, focusing medicine on prevention rather than treatment. According to Google, the information from Baseline will be anonymous, and its use will be limited to medical and health purposes. Data won't be shared with insurance companies.







  • SLS Project Coming Up $400 Million Short
    schwit1 writes: A GAO report finds that the Space Launch System is over budget and NASA will need an additional $400 million to complete its first orbital launch in 2017. From the article: "NASA isn't meeting its own requirements for matching cost and schedule resources with the congressional requirement to launch the first SLS in December 2017. NASA usually uses a calculation it calls the 'joint cost and schedule confidence level' to decide the odds a program will come in on time and on budget. 'NASA policy usually requires a 70 percent confidence level for a program to proceed with final design and fabrication,' the GAO report says, and the SLS is not at that level. The report adds that government programs that can't match requirements to resources 'are at increased risk of cost and schedule growth.' In other words, the GAO says SLS is at risk of costing more than the current estimate of $12 billion to reach the first launch or taking longer to get there. Similar cost and schedule problems – although of a larger magnitude – led President Obama to cancel SLS's predecessor rocket system called Constellation shortly after taking office." The current $12 billion estimate is for the program's cost to achieve one unmanned launch. That's four times what it is costing NASA to get SpaceX, Boeing, and Sierra Nevada to build their three spaceships, all scheduled for their first manned launches before 2017.







  • New SSL Server Rules Go Into Effect Nov. 1
    alphadogg writes: Public certificate authorities (CAs) are warning that as of Nov. 1 they will reject requests for internal SSL server certificates that don't conform to new internal domain naming and IP address conventions designed to safeguard networks. The concern is that SSL server digital certificates issued by CAs at present for internal corporate e-mail servers, Web servers and databases are not unique and can potentially be used in man-in-the-middle attacks involving the setup of rogue servers inside the targeted network, say representatives for the Certification Authority/Browser Forum (CA/B Forum), the industry group that sets security and operational guidelines for digital certificates. Members include the overwhelming bulk of public CAs around the globe, plus browser makers such as Microsoft and Apple. The problem today is that network managers often give their servers names like 'Server1' and allocate internal IP addresses so that SSL certificates issued for them through the public CAs are not necessarily globally unique, notes Trend Micro's Chris Bailey.







  • Siberian Discovery Suggests Almost All Dinosaurs Were Feathered
    A new study published in Science (abstract) suggests that most dinosaurs were covered with feathers. This conclusion was drawn after the discovery of fossils belonging to a 1.5-meter-long, two-legged dinosaur called Kulindadromeus zabaikalicus. "The fossils, which included six skulls and many more bones, greatly broaden the number of families of dinosaurs sporting feathers—downy, ribboned, and thin ones in this case—indicating that plumes evolved from the scales that covered earlier reptiles, probably as insulation." Its distinctiveness from earlier theropod fossil discoveries suggests that feathered dinosaurs appeared much further back in history than previously thought. Paleontologist Stephen Brusatte said, "This does mean that we can now be very confident that feathers weren't just an invention of birds and their closest relatives, but evolved much deeper in dinosaur history. I think that the common ancestor of dinosaurs probably had feathers, and that all dinosaurs had some type of feather, just like all mammals have some type of hair."







  • eSports Starting To Go Mainstream
    An anonymous reader writes: eSports have never been more popular, and many large companies are starting to view them in the same light as traditional sports. The amount of money being thrown around is beginning to rival the money exchanged over sports teams. A recent Dota 2 tournament handed out over $10 million in prizes, and Google's $1 billion purchase of game-streaming site Twitch.tv has now been confirmed. But it doesn't end there — companies like Coca-cola, Intel, Nissan, and major movie studios are looking at the audiences being drawn by eSports and realizing the advertising potential. "Last fall, Riot Games sold out the Staples Center for its League of Legends Championship Series Finals. While 12,000 people watched live in the home of the Lakers and Kings, over 32 million tuned in to the livestream." George Woo, head of a global eSports tournament, said, "Attendance to Intel Extreme Masters events has grown 10X with us filling up sport stadiums, where we have visitors lining up to get a seat to watch the competition. Online it has grown 100X, where we now get more viewers watching livestreams for a single event than we'd have tune in for an entire season in the past."







  • Wikipedia Blocks 'Disruptive' Edits From US Congress
    alphatel writes: Wikipedia has blocked anonymous edits from a congressional IP address for 10 days because of "disruptive" behavior. These otherwise anonymous edits were brought to light recently by @Congressedits, a bot that automatically tweets Wikipedia changes that come from Congressional IP addresses. The biography of former U.S. defense secretary Donald Rumsfeld was edited to say that he was an "alien lizard who eats Mexican babies." Mediaite's Wikipedia page was modified to label the site as a "sexist transphobic" publication.







  • Earth In the Midst of Sixth Mass Extinction: the 'Anthropocene Defaunation'
    mspohr writes: A special issue of Science magazine devoted to 'Vanishing Fauna' publishes a series of articles about the man-caused extinction of species and the implications for ecosystems and the climate. Quoting: "During the Pleistocene epoch, only tens of thousands of years ago, our planet supported large, spectacular animals. Mammoths, terror birds, giant tortoises, and saber-toothed cats, as well as many less familiar species such as giant ground sloths (some of which reached 7 meters in height) and glyptodonts (which resembled car-sized armadillos), roamed freely. Since then, however, the number and diversity of animal species on Earth have consistently and steadily declined. Today we are left with a relatively depauperate fauna, and we continue to lose animal species to extinction rapidly. Although some debate persists, most of the evidence suggests that humans were responsible for extinction of this Pleistocene fauna, and we continue to drive animal extinctions today through the destruction of wild lands, consumption of animals as a resource or a luxury, and persecution of species we see as threats or competitors." Unfortunately, most of the detail is behind a paywall, but the summary should be enough to get the point across.







  • Long-range Electric Car World Speed Record Broken By Australian Students
    New submitter is_this_gdog writes: The Sunswift solar car team from UNSW Australia has broken an international world speed record for the fastest long-range electric vehicle, averaging a speed of 107km/h (66mph) over 500km (310miles) from a single charge with their car, eVe. Solar panels were not used for this record (with solar, the car has a range of over 500 miles), the challenge was endurance speed with battery only. There are faster electric cars, and one or two with longer range if you go slow enough — Sunswift eVe is the first to officially do 500kms at highway speeds (pending official FIA approval). Pictures of the car are available here.







  • Amazon's Ambitious Bets Pile Up, and Its Losses Swell
    New submitter shirleymarone sends word that investors are becoming impatient with Amazon's willingness to absorb short-term losses for theoretical long-term gains. The company brought in over $19 billion in revenue last quarter, but reported a net loss of $126 million. The company warned of even greater losses this quarter. Amazon officials exude a serene if vague confidence. "We're not trying to optimize for short-term profits," Thomas J. Szkutak, the chief financial officer, said in a conference call. "We're investing on behalf of customers and share owners," he said. "We're fortunate to have these opportunities." But even the analysts, who are generally enthusiastic about the company and its global ambitions, are asking slightly more pointed questions these days. For all these investments, one analyst asked Mr. Szkutak, why are sales not increasing even faster? His answer: Just wait. ... Amazon, which is based in Seattle, long ago transcended its roots as a simple retailer. In recent weeks it introduced Zocalo, a document storage and sharing service that grew out of its fast-growing web services division. It began a program to allow readers to consume as many e-books as they want for a set monthly fee. And it is starting to ship its long-awaited entry in the smartphone sweepstakes. The phone, the result of years of development by thousands of Amazon programmers and designers, is meeting some resistance from reviewers.







  • How a Solar Storm Two Years Ago Nearly Caused a Catastrophe On Earth
    schwit1 writes: On July 23, 2012, the sun unleashed two massive clouds of plasma that barely missed a catastrophic encounter with the Earth's atmosphere. These plasma clouds, known as coronal mass ejections (CMEs), comprised a solar storm thought to be the most powerful in at least 150 years. "If it had hit, we would still be picking up the pieces," physicist Daniel Baker of the University of Colorado tells NASA. Fortunately, the blast site of the CMEs was not directed at Earth. Had this event occurred a week earlier when the point of eruption was Earth-facing, a potentially disastrous outcome would have unfolded. "Analysts believe that a direct hit could cause widespread power blackouts, disabling everything that plugs into a wall socket. Most people wouldn't even be able to flush their toilet because urban water supplies largely rely on electric pumps. ... According to a study by the National Academy of Sciences, the total economic impact could exceed $2 trillion, or 20 times greater than the costs of a Hurricane Katrina. Multi-ton transformers damaged by such a storm might take years to repair." Steve Tracton put it this way in his frightening overview of the risks of a severe solar storm: "The consequences could be devastating for commerce, transportation, agriculture and food stocks, fuel and water supplies, human health and medical facilities, national security, and daily life in general."







  • Two Cities Ask the FCC To Preempt State Laws Banning Municipal Fiber Internet
    Jason Koebler writes Two cities—Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Wilson, North Carolina—have officially asked the federal government to help them bypass state laws banning them from expanding their community owned, gigabit fiber internet connections. In states throughout the country, major cable and telecom companies have battled attempts to create community broadband networks, which they claim put them at a competitive disadvantage. The FCC will decide if its able to circumvent state laws that have been put in place restricting the practice.







  • Comet To Make Close Call With Mars
    sciencehabit writes In mid-October, a comet sweeping through our inner solar system for the first time will pass near Mars—so close, in fact, that if it were buzzing Earth at the same distance it would fly by well inside our moon's orbit. While material spewing from the icy visitor probably won't trigger the colossal meteor showers on the Red Planet that some scientists predicted, dust and water vapor may still slam into Mars, briefly heating up its atmosphere and threatening orbiting spacecraft. However it affects the planet, the comet should give scientists their closest view yet of a near-pristine visitor from the outer edges of our solar system.







  • Will Your Next Car Be Covered In Morphing Dimples?
    cartechboy writes Golfing and cars, not much in common there. But that's about to change thanks to a new technology from a research lab at MIT called Smorphs. The idea is simple: put a set of dynamic dimples on the exterior of a car to improve its surface aerodynamics and make it slipperier, and therefore faster. Pedro Reis is the mechanical engineering and research spearheading this project. A while ago Mythbusters proved the validity of the dimpled car form in a much more low-tech way. The concept uses a hollow core surrounded by a thick, deformable layer, and a smoother outer skin. When vacuum is applied, the outer layers suck in to form the dimples. The technology is only in its very earliest stages, but we could see this applied to future vehicles in an effort to make them faster and more fuel efficient.







  • Poetry For Sysadmins: Shall I Compare Thee To a Lumbering Bear?
    itwbennett writes Don't forget that July 25th is Sysadmin Day — a good day to show love to the folks who save your butt again and again when you mess up your computer. Forget the chocolate and flowers, long-time sysadmin Sandra Henry-Stocker has tailored some poems to celebrate these under appreciated, hard-working souls.







  • Metamason: Revolutionizing CPAP Masks With 3D Scanning and 3D Printing
    First time accepted submitter Leslie Oliver Karpas writes As millions of Americans with Obstructive Sleep Apnea struggle to get a good night's sleep, one company has harnessed 3D technology to revolutionize CPAP therapy. As 3ders.org reported today, "Metamason is working on custom CPAP masks for sleep apnea patients via 3D scanning, smart geometry, and 3D printing." "We're at the crossroads of 3D technology and personalized medicine," says Metamason's founder and CEO. "There are many medical products that would be infinitely more comfortable and effective with a customized fit. CPAP therapy is the perfect example—it's a very effective treatment with a 50% quit rate, because mass-produced masks are uncomfortable and don't fit properly." CPAP is a respiratory device worn during sleep to treat OSA, which affects 1 in 4 men and 1 in 9 women in the US alone. Metamason's "ScanFitPrint" process for creating their custom Respere masks translates a 3D scan of the patient's face into a 3D printed custom mask that is a perfect individual fit. To print the masks in soft, biocompatible silicone, Metamason invented a proprietary 3D printing process called Investment Molding, which creates wholly integrated products that were previously considered "unmoldable."







  • One Trillion Bq Released By Nuclear Debris Removal At Fukushima So Far
    AmiMoJo writes The operator of the damaged Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant says more than one trillion becquerels of radioactive substances were released as a result of debris removal work at one of the plant's reactors. Radioactive cesium was detected at levels exceeding the government limit in rice harvested last year in Minami Soma, some 20 kilometers from Fukushima Daiichi. TEPCO presented the Nuclear Regulation Authority with an estimate that the removal work discharged 280 billion becquerels per hour of radioactive substances, or a total of 1.1 trillion becquerels. The plant is believed to be still releasing an average of 10 million becquerels per hour of radioactive material.







  • Man Booted From Southwest Flight and Threatened With Arrest After Critical Tweet
    CanHasDIY writes The old saying goes, "if you can't say anything nice, don't say anything at all." A man learned the consequences Sunday, after Tweeting about his experience with a rude Southwest gate attendant: "A Minnesota man and his two sons were asked to leave a Southwest Airlines flight after the man sent a tweet complaining about being treated rudely by a gate agent. Duff Watson said he was flying from Denver to Minneapolis on Sunday and tried to board in a spot for frequent flyer privileges he held and take his sons, ages 6 and 9, with him, even though they had a later spot to board the plane. The agent told him that he would have to wait if he wanted to board with his children. Watson replied that he had boarded early with them before and then sent out a tweet that read 'RUDEST AGENT IN DENVER. KIMBERLY S. GATE C39. NOT HAPPY @SWA.' Watson told TV broadcaster KARE in Minneapolis on Wednesday that after he boarded, an announcement came over the plane asking his family to exit the aircraft. Once at the gate, the agent said that unless the tweet was deleted, police would be called and the family would not be allowed back onboard." He gave into the threat, deleted the Tweet, and was allowed to board a later flight. Southwest, as one could have predicted, offered a boilerplate "apology" and vouchers.







  • Lawrence Krauss: Congress Is Trying To Defund Scientists At Energy Department
    Lasrick writes Physicist Lawrence Krauss blasts Congress for their passage of the 2015 Energy and Water Appropriations bill that cut funding for renewable energy, sustainable transportation, and energy efficiency, and even worse, had amendments that targeted scientists at the Department of Energy: He writes that this action from the US Congress is worse even than the Australian government's move to cancel their carbon tax, because the action of Congress is far more insidious: "Each (amendment) would, in its own way, specifically prohibit scientists at the Energy Department from doing precisely what Congress should mandate them to do—namely perform the best possible scientific research to illuminate, for policymakers, the likelihood and possible consequences of climate change." Although the bill isn't likely to become law, Krauss is fed up with Congress burying its head in the sand: The fact that those amendments "...could pass a house of Congress, should concern everyone interested in the appropriate support of scientific research as a basis for sound public policy."







  • "Magic Helmet" For F-35 Ready For Delivery
    Graculus writes with news that the so called "magic helmets" for the controversial F-35 are ready for action. This week, Lockheed Martin officially took delivery of a key part of the F-35 fighter's combat functionality—the pilot's helmet. The most expensive and complicated piece of headgear ever constructed, the F-35 Gen III Helmet Mounted Display System (HMDS) is one of the multipurpose fighter's most critical systems, and it's essential to delivering a fully combat-ready version of the fighter to the Marine Corps, the Navy, and the Air Force. But it almost didn't make the cut because of software problems and side effects akin to those affecting 3D virtual reality headsets. Built by Rockwell Collins ESA Vision Systems International (a joint venture between Rockwell Collins and the Israeli defense company Elbit Systems), the HMDS goes way beyond previous augmented reality displays embedded in pilots' helmets. In addition to providing the navigational and targeting information typically shown in a combat aircraft's heads-up display, the HMDS also includes aspects of virtual reality, allowing a pilot to look through the plane. Using a collection of six high-definition video and infrared cameras on the fighter's exterior called the Distributed Aperture System (DAS), the display extends vision a full 360 degrees around the aircraft from within the cockpit. The helmet is also equipped with night vision capabilities via an infrared sensor that projects imagery inside the facemask







  • Western US States Using Up Ground Water At an Alarming Rate
    sciencehabit (1205606) writes A new study shows that ground water in the Colorado basin is being depleted six times faster than surface water. The groundwater losses, which take thousands of years to be recharged naturally, point to the unsustainability of exploding population centers and water-intensive agriculture in the basin, which includes most of Arizona and parts of Colorado, California, Nevada, Utah, New Mexico, and Wyoming. Because ground water feeds many of the streams and rivers in the area, more of them will run dry.







  • Chromebooks Are Outselling iPads In Schools
    Nate the greatest (2261802) writes Apple thrilled investors earlier this week when they revealed that they had sold 13 million iPads to schools and claimed 85% of the educational tablet market, but that wasn't the whole story. It turns out that Apple has only sold 5 million iPads to schools since February 2013, or an average of less than a million tablets a quarter over 6 quarters. It turns out that instead of buying iPads, schools are buying Chromebooks. Google reported that a million Chromebooks were sold to schools last quarter, well over half of the 1.8 million units sold in the second quarter. With Android tablets getting better, Apple is losing market share in the consumer tablet market, and now it looks Apple is also losing the educational market to Google. Analysts are predicting that 5 million Chromebooks will be sold by the end of the year; how many of those will be sold to schools, do you think?







  • A Warm-Feeling Wooden Keyboard (Video)
    Plastic, plastic everywhere! Except on most surfaces of the Keyboardio ergonomic keyboard, which started as a 'scratch his itch' project by Jesse Vincent. According to his blurb on the Keyboardio site, Jesse 'has spent the last 20 years writing software like Request Tracker, K-9 Mail, and Perl. He types... a lot. He tried all the keyboards before finally making his own.' His objective was to make a keyboard he really liked. And he apparently has. This video was shot in June, and Jesse already has a new model prototype under way that Tim Lord says is a notable improvement on the June version he already liked. || Note that the Keyboardio is hackable and open source, so if you think you can improve it, go right ahead. (Alternate Video Link)







  • ScummVM 1.7.0 Released
    jones_supa (887896) writes It's been a while since a new ScummVM release, but version 1.7.0 is now here with many exciting features. New games supported are The Neverhood, Mortville Manor, Voyeur, Return to Ringworld and Chivalry is Not Dead. The Roland MT-32 emulator has been updated, there is an OpenGL backend, the GUI has seen improvements, AGOS engine is enhanced, tons of SCI bug fixes have been applied, and various other improvements can be found. This version also introduces support for the OUYA gaming console and brings improvements to some other more exotic platforms. Please read the release notes for an accurate description of the new version. SCUMM being the language/interpreter used by many classic adventure games.







  • Laser Eye Surgery, Revisited 10 Years Later
    gunner_von_diamond (3461783) happened upon Ask Slashdot: Experiences with Laser Eye Surgery from ten years ago, and asks: I was just reading a story on /. from 10 years ago about Lasik Eye Surgery. Personally, I've had Lasik done and loved every single part of the surgery. I went from wearing contacts/glasses every day to having 20/15 vision! In the older post, everyone seemed to be cautious about it, waiting for technical advances before having the surgery. Today, the surgery is fairly inexpensive [even for a programmer :) ], takes about 10-15 minutes, and I recovered from the surgery that same day. So my question is: what is holding everyone else back from freeing themselves from contacts and glasses?







  • Twitch rich as Google flicks $1bn hitch switch, claims snitch
    Gameplay streaming biz and search king refuse to deny fresh gobble rumors
    Google and Twitch were tight-lipped this morning in California – amid swirling rumors that the internet goliath will formally seal a $1bn deal to buy the video-streaming upstart.…






  • Disaster Recovery upstart joins DR 'as a service' gang
    Quorum joins the aaS crowd with DRaaS offering
    Disaster recovery company Quorum uses a customer’s second site or its own cloud site to provide the user with backup and DR location for physical and virtualised server customers, and claims one-click recovery through its on-site onQ appliances.…



  • The XP factor gives MEGA-DISTIE Ingram Q2 sales a boost
    Just don't ask about operating profits...
    The tills rang often for massive global distie Ingram Micro during its second calendar quarter, helped by frenzied PC refresh activity, but squeezing out better long term profits remains a work in progress.…


  • Pinterest diversity stats: Also pale and male (but not as much as Twitter)
    Cats'n'flowers site latest to admit white men rule its roost
    Pinterest is generally used to store images of polka dot knickers, cute animals and bags of artisan pear drops. What might come as a shock to its users is that Pinterest is actually run by the same “stale, pale and male” clique often seen at the rudder of other big Silicon Valley.…






  • Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
    Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
    A woman has bought a class action lawsuit for "invasion of privacy" against Apple over claims surrounding the firm's use of Location Services to track iPhone users and store data on their movements.…


  • US judge 'troubled' by Apple's $450m bid to end ebook price-fixing row
    Beak questions whether settlement is fair to customers
    US federal judge Denise Cote is not particularly chuffed with Apple and its proposed $450m settlement in an ebook price-fixing lawsuit – because the odds are stacked against customers if the appeals process goes Cupertino's way.…


  • Sysadmin Day 2014: Quick, there's still time to get the beers in
    He walked over the broken glass, killed the thugs... and er... reconnected the cables*
    It is 25 July, and that means it's Systems Administrators Appreciation Day once more. Sysadmin Day is that one special day a year where syadmins the world over say to each other "Wow, I can't believe we all made it another year", and everyone else forgets that this has been a thing for 14 years.…







  • Roll out the welcome mat to hackers and crackers
    Security chap pens guide to bug bounty programs that won't fail like Yahoo!'s
    A clear and easy to read policy is key to developing a good internal bug bounty program, according to BugCrowd which has published guidelines to help businesses encourage the security community to report vulnerabilities.…



  • Teardown gurus iFixit play with Fire – Amazon's new mobe
    Amazon handset proves a complex bit of kit in repair tests
    The teardown team at repairs biz iFixit has cracked open Amazon's Fire smartmobe, and it seems the new handset is indeed a complex piece of kit even by modern smartphone standards.…


  • Huawei to virtual world: Give us your desktops and no-one gets hurt
    Telecom-directed virty efforts won't be pitched at mainstream workloads … yet
    Huawei's ambitions in the virtualisation market centre on desktop virtualisation and network function virtualisation for telcos, according to the company's CTO for data centre solutions Ron Raffensperger.…



  • Four fake Google haxbots hit YOUR WEBSITE every day
    Goog the perfect ruse to slip into SEO orfice
    One in every 24 Googlebots is a imitation spam-flinging denial of service villain that masquerades as Mountain View to sneak past web perimeter defences, according to security chaps at Incapsula.…





  • Beancounters tell NASA it's too poor to fly planned mega-rocket
    Space Launch System would need another $400m and a lot of time
    The US Government Accounting Office (GAO) has told NASA it has a massive funding shortfall for its ambitious Space Launch System (SLS) rocket if the spacecraft has any chance of blasting off on schedule.…


  • Putin: Crack Tor for me and I'll make you a MILLIONAIRE
    Russian Interior Ministry offers big pile o' roubles for busting pro-privacy browser
    Russia's Interior Ministry has posted a tender seeking parties willing to “study the possibility of obtaining technical information about users (user equipment) TOR anonymous network".…


  • Google devs: Tearing Chrome away from OpenSSL not that easy
    Custom BoringSSL fork not quite a drop-in replacement yet
    Google is trying to migrate its Chrome browser away from the buggy OpenSSL cryptography library toward BoringSSL, its homegrown fork, but swapping out the crypto code is proving more difficult than it sounds.…




  • Come close, dear reader. Past those trees you'll see a non-Microsoft Nokia Oyj in the wild
    Oh, it's a bit wobbly on its feet but it still has its wits about it
    Nokia – the Finnish networking firm, not the Microsoft division that sells low-cost mobes running Windows Phone – reported earnings for another difficult quarter on Thursday, yet showed signs that its operations are beginning to stabilize since punting its Devices and Services business off to Redmond.…




  • Lower prices are BAD FOR CONSUMERS, says Turnbull
    (PS, ACCC, please don't spit in Telstra's soup, okay?)
    Communications minister Malcolm Turnbull has intervened in an Australian Consumer And Competition Commission (ACCC) inquiry, warning Australia's competition regulator not to cut the wholesale price of fixed line services.…




  • US Social Security 'wasted $300 million on an IT BOONDOGGLE'
    Scrutiny committee bods probe derailed database project
    Members of the US Congress are demanding answers from the Social Security Administration (SSA) over an ongoing IT project that has racked up a $288m bill without deploying a field-ready product.…


  • Hadoop coop's $50m scoop: Hortonworks takes HP coin
    Investment gives IT titan seat on the board – just in time for The Machine
    Hadoop has become a strategic battleground for three of the world's most influential technology companies, judging by HP's $50m investment into Hadoop company Hortonworks.…


  • Arrr: Freetard-bothering Digital Economy Act tied up, thrown in the hold
    Ministry of Fun confirms: Yes, we're busy doing nothing
    The Ministry of Fun says it isn't going to put the Digital Economy Act's anti-piracy measures into use – and will instead leave it to the creative industry's newer, kinder and gentler awareness campaign, Creative Content UK, to school digital pirates.…








Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM