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  • Red Hat: 2014:0415-01: libyaml: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated libyaml packages that fix two security issues are now available for Red Hat Common for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. The Red Hat Security Response Team has rated this update as having [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:0413-02: java-1.7.0-oracle: Critical Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated java-1.7.0-oracle packages that fix several security issues are now available for Oracle Java for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 and 6. The Red Hat Security Response Team has rated this update as having Critical [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:0414-01: java-1.6.0-sun: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated java-1.6.0-sun packages that fix several security issues are now available for Oracle Java for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 and 6. The Red Hat Security Response Team has rated this update as having [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:0412-01: java-1.7.0-oracle: Critical Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated java-1.7.0-oracle packages that fix several security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 and 6 Supplementary. The Red Hat Security Response Team has rated this update as having Critical [More...]


  • Mandriva: 2014:079: json-c
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated json-c packages fix security vulnerabilities:Florian Weimer reported that the printbuf APIs used in the json-clibrary used ints for counting buffer lengths, which is inappropriatefor 32bit architectures. These functions need to be changed to using[More...]



  • Mandriva: 2014:078: asterisk
    LinuxSecurity.com: Multiple vulnerabilities has been discovered and corrected in asterisk:Sending a HTTP request that is handled by Asterisk with a large numberof Cookie headers could overflow the stack. You could even exhaustmemory if you sent an unlimited number of headers in the request[More...]







  • Heartbleed: Security experts reality-check the 3 most hysterical fears
    Heartbleed has dominated tech headlines for a week now. News outlets, citizen bloggers, and even late-night TV hosts have jumped on the story, each amping up the alarm a little more than the last one. But while it's true Heartbleed is a critical flaw with widespread implications, several security experts we've spoken with believe the sky-is-falling tone of the reporting is a bit melodramatic.


  • Kubuntu 14.04 Screenshot Tour
    Welcome to Kubuntu 14.04 LTS, a brand new long-term supported version with the latest KDE software to enjoy. Long-term support means that bug fixes and security updates will be added for the next 5 years, so you can be safe to use it until 2019. New releases of important KDE software will also be available from the Kubuntu Updates and Kubuntu Backports PPAs.


  • Microsoft Abandons Windows 8.1: Take Immediate Action Or Be Cut Off Like Windows XP
    Microsoft MSFT -0.97% has been on a roll lately. Office for iOS (and soon Android), free Windows licenses for small devices, universal Windows and Windows Phone apps, Siri rival Cortana, even a promise to eventually return the start menu before Windows 9. But when it comes to Windows 8, it seems the company has a permanently loaded pistol aimed squarely at its feet.So it fits that just one week on from the launch of ‘Windows 8.1 Update 1’ (the smart upgrade mouse and keyboard users have long awaited) stupidity would strike once again.


  • Ubuntu 14.04 ships with tablet support and improved touch
    Canonical released Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, with five-year support, enhanced touchscreen support, and the first stable build of Ubuntu for Tablets. Back in November 2011 when Canonical CEO Mark Shuttleworth announced Ubuntu would support apps that ran on smartphones and tablets, as well as desktop PCs, Ubuntu 14.04 was heralded as the “convergence” release that would […]




  • Heartbleed: Security experts reality-check the 3 most hysterical fears
    Everything's been hacked! Change all your passwords but not yet! Security experts cut through the Heartbleed hype. But while it's true Heartbleed is a critical flaw with widespread implications, several security experts we've spoken with believe the sky-is-falling tone of the reporting is a bit melodramatic.




  • Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 Screenshot Tour
    The Ubuntu GNOME team is proud and happy to announce the release of Ubuntu GNOME 14.04 LTS. Ubuntu GNOME is an official flavour of Ubuntu, featuring the GNOME desktop environment. Ubuntu GNOME is a mostly pure GNOME desktop experience built from the Ubuntu repositories. This is our very first long-term support (LTS) version. Features: Most of GNOME 3.10 is now included, the few missing bits of 3.10 are available in PPA.



  • OpenStack Icehouse brings new features for the enterprise
    Deploying an open source enterprise cloud just got a little bit easier yesterday with the release of the newest version of the OpenStack platform: Icehouse. To quote an email from OpenStack release manager Thierry Carrez announcing the release, "During this cycle we added a[he]nbsp[/he]new integrated component (Trove), completed more than 350 feature[he]nbsp[/he]blueprints, and fixed almost 3000 reported bugs in integrated projects[he]nbsp[/he]alone!"


  • Xubuntu 14.04 Screenshot Tour
    The Xubuntu team is pleased to announce the immediate release of Xubuntu 14.04. Xubuntu 14.04 is an LTS (Long-Term Support) release and will be supported for 3 years.



  • IPSEC/L2TP VPN on Ubuntu 14.04 with OpenSwan, xl2tpd and ppp
    This is a guide on setting up an IPSEC/L2TP vpn server with Ubuntu 14.04 using Openswan as the IPsec server, xl2tpd as the l2tp provider and ppp or local users / PAM for authentication. It has a detailed explanation with every step. We choose the IPSEC/L2TP protocol stack because of recent vulnerabilities found in pptpd VPNs and because it is supported on all major operating systems by default. More than ever, your freedom and privacy when online is under threat. Governments and ISPs want to control what you can and can't see while keeping a record of everything you do, and even the shady-looking guy lurking around your coffee shop or the airport gate can grab your bank details easier than you may think. A self hosted VPN lets you surf the web the way it was intended: anonymously and without oversight.


  • Digital Public Library of America triples its free collections and more in year one
    When the Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) opened last year, Carolyn Fox covered it's progress after one month in her article:Review of the new Digital Public Library of America. In it she explained that the purpose of the Library is "to provide a large-scale, national public digital library of America's archives, libraries, museums, and cultural institutions into one portal."




  • Eli Lilly Enlists Congress In Fight Against Canada For Refusing Patent On Useless Drug
    Eli Lilly bet its entire business model on patents years back, rather than on creating useful products that people want to buy. Lately it's been having trouble getting new patents, and is reacting extremely poorly to the fact that its last-gasp efforts to get new patents aren't working. As we've noted, a few years back, Canada rejected some patent applications for some Eli Lilly drug after the Canadian patent board "determined that the drug had failed to deliver the benefits the firm promised when obtaining the patent." In other words, after realizing that the drug is not useful, Canada rejected the patent.And Eli Lilly flipped out.


  • How to install Roundcube on your ISPConfig3 server on CentOS 6
    How to install Roundcube on your ISPConfig3 server on CentOS 6This tutorial has been created for those who have installed The Perfect Server - CentOS 6.4 x86_64 [ISPConfig 3] and wish to have alternative webmail application - Roundcube. You may still able access to Squiremail as this Roundcube installation will not overwrite the Squirremail.


Error: It's not possible to reach RSS file http://www.newsforge.com/index.rss ...




  • You Can Own The Spookiest Island In Venice
    One Venetian island is the stuff of campfire ghost stories — piles of dead bodies burned, hauntings by plague victims, and a home for the insane. And now, for a price, it can be yours.


  • The Design Flaw That Almost Wiped Out An NYC Skyscraper
    When it was built, Citicorp Center was, at 59 stories, the seventh-tallest building in the world. You can pick it out of the New York City skyline by its 45 degree-angled top. But it’s the base of the building that really makes the tower so unique. The bottom nine of its 59 stories are stilts.




  • Vinyl's Great. But It's Not Better Than CDs
    On a theoretical level, there's just no reason it should be the case that vinyl sounds better. There are built-in problems with using vinyl as a data encoding mechanisms that have no CD equivalent.









  • Why Ukraine Isn't Just An Extension Of Russia
    Dozens of statues of Lenin fell in Ukrainian cities; no one in the opposition asked people to treat them “in a civilized manner,” because in this case a “polite” dismantling could mean only one thing — conserving a potent symbol of Soviet power.




  • Who Really Owns The Internet?
    Why are a tiny handful of people making so much money off of material produced for nothing or next-to-nothing by so many others? Why do we make it so easy for Internet moguls to avoid stepping on to what one called "the treadmill of paying for content"? Who owns the Internet?


  • A Brief History Of Evil Movie Computers
    As Shelley predicted through her literary proxy Victor Frankenstein, humanity never lets mishaps or moral ambiguity stand in the way of innovation. Nor does Hollywood miss a moment to skewer the technological future in the name of entertainment.







  • 18 Maps From When The World Thought California Was An Island
    Glen McLaughlin wandered into a London map shop in 1971 and discovered something strange. On a map from 1663 he noticed something he’d never seen before: California was floating like a big green carrot, untethered to the west coast of North America.




  • What I Saw Running North Korea's Marathon
    Here I am, a foreigner in North Korea, with high-end running gear, flourescent sneakers, and energy gels in my pockets. The local runners, meanwhile, sport antiquated uniforms and shoes that look like they might fall apart.


  • Libraries Seek High-Speed Broadband
    Though 62 percent of libraries offer the only free computer and Internet access in their communities, only 9 percent say they have the high-capacity connections needed to support the computers, Wi-Fi and technological training necessary for an increasingly paperless world.




  • Wingsuit Pilots Fly At 125MPH Under Bridge On Side Of Mountain
    The world's most renowned wingsuit pilots, Jokke Sommer, Espen Fadnes and Ludovic Woerth spent a year looking for the perfect flight. This is one of their most memorable moments: a never-before-attempted flight under the bridge of the Aiguille du Midi in Chamonix at Mont Blanc, France. At 3,800 meters up and flying at over 125mph, there is little room for error.



  • Sensational Stories From The Bat Cave
    The Dark Knight's 75th anniversary is spawning a year-long celebration. We asked some Batman notables to spill some behind-the-scenes tales from bringing the Caped Crusader to life.



  • Astronauts To Scare The Crap Out Of You Next Week
    This Earth Day, Tuesday, April 22, three former NASA astronauts will present new evidence that our planet has experienced many more large-scale asteroid impacts over the past decade than previously thought… three to ten times more, in fact.


  • An Interview With The Guy Who Told The Whole Internet His Password
    Earlier this week, a commenter named Y. Woodman Brown posted his online passwords in the Washington Post comments section to show just how little his online security mattered to him, and it was quickly picked up by the press as an example of online security hubris. Naturally, we had to find him.




  • Beer Price Crisis On the Horizon
    Rambo Tribble (1273454) writes "The aficionados of beer and distilled spirits could be in for a major price-shock, if proposals by the Food and Drug Administration come to pass. Currently, breweries are allowed to sell unprocessed brewing by-products to feed farm animals. Farmers prize the nutritious, low-cost feed. But, new rules proposed by the FDA could force brewers to implement costly processing facilities or dump the by-products as waste. As one brewer put it, "Beer prices would go up for everybody to cover the cost of the equipment and installation.""







  • Heartbleed Used To Bypass 2-Factor Authentication, Hijack User Sessions
    wiredmikey (1824622) writes "Security nightmares sparked by the Heartbleed OpenSSL vulnerability continue. According to Mandiant, now a unit of FireEye, an attacker was able to leverage the Heartbleed vulnerability against the VPN appliance of a customer and hijack multiple active user sessions. The attack bypassed both the organization's multifactor authentication and the VPN client software used to validate that systems connecting to the VPN were owned by the organization and running specific security software. "Specifically, the attacker repeatedly sent malformed heartbeat requests to the HTTPS web server running on the VPN device, which was compiled with a vulnerable version of OpenSSL, to obtain active session tokens for currently authenticated users," Mandiant's Christopher Glyer explained. "With an active session token, the attacker successfully hijacked multiple active user sessions and convinced the VPN concentrator that he/she was legitimately authenticated." After connecting to the VPN, the attacker attempted to move laterally and escalate his/her privileges within the victim organization, Mandiant said."







  • Russia Writes Off 90 Percent of North Korea Debt
    jones_supa (887896) writes "In Russia, the State Duma (lower house) on Friday ratified a 2012 agreement to write off the bulk of North Korea's debt. It said the total debt stood at $10.96 billion as of Sept. 17, 2012. Russia sees this lucrative in advancing the plans to build a gas pipe and railroad through North to South Korea. The rest of the debt, $1.09 billion, would be redeemed during the next 20 years, to be paid in equal installments every six months. The outstanding debt owed by North Korea will be managed by Russia's state development bank, Vnesheconombank. Moscow has been trying to diversify its energy sales to Asia away from Europe, which, in its turn, wants to cut its dependence on oil and gas from the erstwhile Cold War foe. Russia's state-owned top natural producer Gazprom is dreaming shipping 10 billion cubic meters of gas annually through the Koreas. Russia has written off debts to a number of impoverished Soviet-era allies, including Cuba. North Korea's struggling communist economy is just 2 percent of the size of neighboring South's."







  • The Design Flaw That Almost Wiped Out an NYC Skyscraper
    Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes "Joel Werner writes in Slate that when Citicorp Center was built in 1977 it was, at 59 stories, the seventh-tallest building in the world but no one figured out until after it was built that although the chief structural engineer, William LeMessurier, had properly accounted for perpendicular winds, the building was particularly vulnerable to quartering winds — in part due to cost-saving changes made to the original plan by the contractor. "According to LeMessurier, in 1978 an undergraduate architecture student contacted him with a bold claim about LeMessurier's building: that Citicorp Center could blow over in the wind," writes Werner. "LeMessurier realized that a major storm could cause a blackout and render the tuned mass damper inoperable. Without the tuned mass damper, LeMessurier calculated that a storm powerful enough to take out the building hit New York every 16 years." In other words, for every year Citicorp Center was standing, there was about a 1-in-16 chance that it would collapse." (Read on for more.)







  • Declassified Papers Hint US Uranium May Have Ended Up In Israeli Arms
    Lasrick (2629253) writes "Victor Gilinsky and Roger J. Mattson update their story on the NUMEC affair to take into account the recent release of hundreds of classified documents that shed additional light on the story. In the 1960s, the Nuclear Materials and Equipment Corporation (NUMEC) was found to be missing about a 100 pounds of bomb-grade uranium. Based on available evidence, Gilinsky and Mattson are convinced that the material ended up in Israel nuclear bombs. The newly release documents add more to the story, and Gilinsky and Mattson are calling on President Obama to declassify the remainder of the file."







  • For $20, Build a VR Headset For Your Smartphone
    An anonymous reader writes "Not everyone can drop a few hundred dollars on a VR headset, but that doesn't mean they can't experience VR! For those with the time and a bit of handiwork skill, this DIY guide from guest writer Ohaple will show you how to make a smartphone-based VR headset for as little as $20. Along the way, you'll learn the hardware and software basics of a VR headset." This project screams for a ready-made commercial version; does anyone know of existing purpose-built headgear? As one of the comments on the linked tutorial says, Poppy seems close, but lacks an LED for tracking.







  • Microsoft Plans $1 Billion Server Farm In Iowa
    1sockchuck (826398) writes "Microsoft will invest $1.1 billion to build a massive new server farm in Iowa, not far from an existing data center in West Des Moines. The 1.2 million square foot campus will be one of the biggest in the history of the data center industry. It further enhances Iowa's status as the data center capital of the Midwest, with Google and Facebook also operating huge server farms in the state."







  • DARPA Developing the Ultimate Auto-Pilot Software
    coondoggie (973519) writes "Call it the ultimate auto-pilot — an automated system that can help take care of all phases of aircraft flight-even perhaps helping pilots overcome system failures in-flight. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) will in May detail a new program called Aircrew Labor In-Cockpit Automation System (ALIAS) that would build upon what the agency called the considerable advances that have been made in aircraft automation systems over the past 50 years, as well as the advances made in remotely piloted aircraft automation, to help reduce pilot workload, augment mission performance and improve aircraft safety."








  • SpaceX Lands Launches Load to ISS, Successfully Tests Falcon 9 Over Water
    mosb1000 (710161) writes "SpaceX is reporting that they've successfully landed the first stage of their CRS3 Falcon 9 rocket over the Atlantic Ocean today. This is potentially a huge milestone for low-cost space flight." In another win for the company, as the L.A. Times reports, SpaceX also has launched a re-supply mission to the ISS.







  • Bookies Predict the Future of Tech
    First time accepted submitter machineghost (622031) writes "It's one thing to make predictions about the future of tech; that happens all the time on Slashdot. But it's quite a different thing to put money on the line to back up those predictions, which is exactly what this British bookie has done. Think you know whether Google Glass will beat the iPhone, or whether we'll be ready to go to Mars and back by 2020? Now's your chance to capitalize on those predictions!" Or you could, y'know, invest money in at least some of them, and thereby increase their chances of succeeding.







  • Minerva CEO Details His High-Tech Plan To Disrupt Universities
    waderoush (1271548) writes "In April 2012, former Snapfish CEO Ben Nelson provoked both praise and skepticism by announcing that he'd raised $25 million from venture firm Benchmark to start the Minerva Project, a new kind of university where students will live together but all class seminars will take place over a Google Hangouts-style video conferencing system. Two years later, there are answers – or the beginnings of answers – to many of the questions observers have raised about the project, on everything from the way the seminars will be organized to how much tuition the San Francisco-based university will charge and how it's gaining accreditation. And in an interview published today, Nelson share more details about how Minerva plans to use technology to improve teaching quality. 'If a student wants football and Greek life and not doing any work for class, they have every single Ivy League university to choose from,' Nelson says. 'That is not what we provide. Similarly, there are faculty who want to do research and get in front of a lecture hall and regurgitate the same lecture they've been giving for 20 years. We have a different model,' based on extensive faculty review of video recordings of the seminars, to make sure students are picking up key concepts. Last month Minerva admitted 45 students to its founding class, and in September it expects to welcome 19 of them to its Nob Hill residence hall."







  • Peoria Mayor Sends Police To Track Down Twitter Parodist
    New submitter rotorbudd (1242864) writes with an article at Reason about Jim Ardis, mayor of Peoria, Illinois, who ordered police to track down whoever was responsible for a parody Twitter account mocking him."Guess the good Mayor has never heard of the Streisand Effect. 'The original Twitter account had a total of 50 followers. The new account has over 200.'"







  • California Utility May Replace IT Workers with H-1B Workers
    dcblogs writes: "Southern California Edison is preparing to offshore IT jobs, the second major U.S. utility in the last year to do so. It will be cutting its staff, but it hasn't said by how much. The utility is using at least two offshore outsourcing firms, according to government records. SCE's management culture may be particularly primed for firing its IT workers. Following a workplace shooting in SCE's IT offices in 2011, the utility conducted an independent audit of its organizational and management culture. One observation in this report, which was completed a year later, was that 'employees perceive managers to be more concerned about how they 'look' from above, and less concerned about how they are viewed by their subordinates. This fosters an unhealthy culture and climate by sending a message to employees that it is more important to focus on how things look from the top than how they actually are down below.'"







  • How Nest and FitBit Might Spy On You For Cash
    Nerval's Lobster writes: "Forbes offers up a comforting little story about how Nest and FitBit are planning on turning user data in a multi-billion-dollar business. 'Smart-thermostat maker Nest Labs (which is being acquired by Google for $3.2 billion) has quietly built a side business managing the energy consumption of a slice of its customers on behalf of electric companies,' reads the article. 'In wearables, health tracker Fitbit is selling companies the tracking bracelets and analytics services to better manage their health care budgets, and its rival Jawbone may be preparing to do the same.' As many a wit has said over the years: If you're not paying, you're the product. But if Forbes is right, wearable-electronics companies may have discovered a sweeter deal: paying customers on one side, and companies paying for those customers' data on the other. Will most consumers actually care, though?"







  • Americans Uncomfortable With Possibility of Ubiquitous Drones, Designer Babies
    alphadogg writes: "Americans are optimistic about scientific inventions on the horizon, though are cautious about future uses of DNA, robots, drones and always-on implants, according to the latest Pew Research Center survey on future technology (PDF). Asked about the likelihood of certain advances 50 years from now, survey respondents were most sure that lab-grown custom organs for transplant will happen (81%). Only 19% expect humans will be able to control the weather by then. When asked how they felt about possible near-term advances, 65% thought robot caregivers for the elderly is a bad idea, 63% didn't want to see personal drones in U.S. airspace, and 66% thought parents altering the DNA of prospective children was a bad idea."







  • MediaGoblin and FSF Successfully Raise Funds For Federation, Privacy Features
    paroneayea writes: "GNU MediaGoblin and the Free Software Foundation have jointly run a campaign for privacy and federation on the web. The campaign is in its last day but has already passed the first two funding milestones, and is hoping to raise more with the possibility of bringing in multiple dedicated resources to the project. The project has also released a full financial transparency report so donors can know how they can expect their money to be used!"







  • VA Supreme Court: Michael Mann Needn't Turn Over All His Email
    RoccamOccam sends news that the Virginia Supreme Court has ruled that Michael Mann, a climate scientist notable for his work on the "hockey stick" graph, does not have to turn over the entirety of his papers and emails under Freedom of Information laws. Roughly 1,000 documents were turned over in response to the request, but another 12,000 remain, which lawyers for the University of Virginia say are "of a proprietary nature," and thus entitled to an exemption. The VA Supreme Court ruled (PDF), "the higher education research exemption's desired effect is to avoid competitive harm not limited to financial matters," and said the application of "proprietary" was correct in this case. Mann said he hopes the ruling "can serve as a precedent in other states confronting this same assault on public universities and their faculty."







  • Ask Slashdot: What Tech Products Were Built To Last?
    itwbennett writes: "When you think about tech products these days, you probably think 'refresh cycle' more than 'built to last.' But there are plenty of tech products that put up with hard, daily use year after year. Here's a few to get you started: Logitech MX510 mouse, Brother black & white laser printer, Casio G-Shock watch, Alvin Draf-Tec Retrac mechanical pencil, Sony Dream Machine alarm clock. What's your longest-lasting, hardest-working device?"







  • Samsung's Position On Tizen May Hurt Developer Recruitment
    CowboyRobot sends in an article about how Samsung's constantly shifting plans for its smartwatches are making it hard for developers to commit to building apps. Quoting: "Samsung's first smartwatch, released in October last year, ran a modified version of Google's Android platform. The device had access to about 80 apps at launch, all of which were managed by a central smartphone app. Samsung offered developers an SDK for the Galaxy Gear so they could create more apps. Developers obliged. Then Samsung changed direction. Samsung announced a new series of smartwatches in February: the Gear 2, Gear 2 Neo, and Gear Fit. Unlike the first device, these three run Samsung’s Tizen platform. ... This week, Samsung made things even more interesting. Speaking to Reuters, Yoon Han-kil, senior vice president of Samsung’s product strategy team, said the company is working on a watch that will use Google’s Android Wear platform. In other words, Samsung will bring three different watches to market with three different operating systems in under a year."







  • Detroit: America's Next Tech Boomtown
    jfruh writes: "Over the past few years, the growth rate in Detroit tech jobs has been twice the natural average. The reason is the industry that still makes Detroit a company town: U.S. automotive companies are getting into high tech in a big way, and need qualified people to help them do it. Another bonus: the rent is a lot cheaper than it is in San Francisco. '[A]ccording to Automation Alley's 2013 Technology Industry Report, the metro Detroit area grew to a total of 242,520 technology industry jobs in 2011, representing a 15% increase from the 2010 level of 210,984 technology industry jobs. No other benchmarked region had greater technology industry growth than metro Detroit in this period. Further, according to the report, this growth helped propel metro Detroit to a ranking of fourth among the 14 benchmarked regions, passing San Jose."







  • Bug Bounties Don't Help If Bugs Never Run Out
    Bennett Haselton writes: "I was an early advocate of companies offering cash prizes to researchers who found security holes in their products, so that the vulnerabilities can be fixed before the bad guys exploited them. I still believe that prize programs can make a product safer under certain conditions. But I had naively overlooked that under an alternate set of assumptions, you might find that not only do cash prizes not make the product any safer, but that nothing makes the product any safer — you might as well not bother fixing certain security holes at all, whether they were found through a prize program or not." Read on for the rest of Bennett's thoughts.







  • The Internet of Things and Humans
    An anonymous reader writes "Speculating the future of human computer interaction, Tim O'Reilly contemplates how humans and things cooperate differently when things get smarter. He says, '[S]o many of the most interesting applications of the Internet of Things involve new ways of thinking about how humans and things cooperate differently when the things get smarter. It really ought to be called the Internet of Things and Humans ... is Uber an #IoT application? Most people would say it is not; it’s just a pair of smartphone apps connecting a passenger and driver. But imagine for a moment the consumer end of the Uber app as it is today, and on the other end, a self-driving car. You would immediately see that as #IoT. ... Long before we get to fully autonomous devices, there are many “halfway house” applications that are really Internet of Things applications in waiting, which use humans for one or more parts of the entire system. When you understand that the general pattern of #IoTH applications is not just sensor + network + actuator but various combinations of human + network + actuator or sensor + network, you will broaden the possibilities for interfaces and business models."







  • Investors Value Yahoo's Core Business At Less Than $0
    An anonymous reader writes "Yahoo is most known for its search, email, and news services. But its U.S. web presence is only part of its corporate portfolio. It also owns large stakes in Yahoo Japan and Alibaba (a web services company based in China). Yahoo Japan is publicly traded, and Alibaba is heading toward an IPO, so both have a pretty firm valuation. The thing is: when you account for Yahoo's share of each and subtract them from Yahoo's current market cap, you get a negative number. Investors actually value Yahoo's core business at less than nothing. Bloomberg's Matt Levine explains: 'I guess this is fairly obvious, but it leads you to a general theory of the conglomerate discount, which is that a business can be worth less than zero (to shareholders), but a company can't be (to shareholders). ... A fun question is, as fiduciaries for shareholders, should Yahoo's directors split into three separate companies to maximize value? If YJHI and YAHI are worth around $9 billion and $40 billion, and Core Yahoo Inc. is worth around, I don't know, one penny, then just doing some corporate restructuring should create $13 billion in free shareholder value. Why not do that?'"







  • Mathematicians Devise Typefaces Based On Problems of Computational Geometry
    KentuckyFC writes: "Typeface design is something of an art. For many centuries, this art has been constrained by the materials available to typographers, mainly lead and wood. More recently, typographers have been freed from this constraint with the advent of digital typesetting and the number of typefaces has mushroomed. Verdana, for example, is designed specifically for computer screens. Now a father and son team of mathematicians have devised a number of typefaces based on problems they have studied in computational geometry. For example, one typeface is inspired by the folds and valleys generated by computational origami designs. Another is based on the open problem of 'whether every disjoint set of unit disks (gears or wheels) in the plane can be visited by a single taut non-self-intersecting conveyor belt.' Interestingly, several of the new typefaces also serve as puzzles in which messages are the solutions."







  • LOHAN and the amazing technicolor spaceplane
    Our Vulture 2 livery is wrapped, and it's les noix du mutt
    Picture special Cue the traditional portentous drumroll and fanfare of trumpets as we reveal today the finished livery of our Vulture 2 spaceplane – a provocative combination of paint job and vinyl wrap which is, frankly, the mutt's nuts.…


  • R.I.P. LADEE: Probe smashes into lunar surface at 3,600mph
    Swan dive signs off successful science mission
    Pics NASA has confirmed that the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft, which has spent the last 100 days orbiting the Moon, has shuffled off its mortal coil in a spectacular swan dive into the lunar regolith between 9:30pm and 10:22pm PDT on Thursday.…


  • Judge halts spread of zombie Nortel patents to Texas in Google trial
    Epic Rockstar patent war to be waged in California
    Google has won a victory in its battle against patent troll Rockstar, with a US District Court judge having denied Rockstar's request to try the case in the troll-friendly Eastern District of Texas, rather than in California.…



  • True optical zoom coming to HTC smartphone cameras
    Time to ditch that heavy DSLR? Maybe in a year, year and a half
    An HTC spokesman says that smartphone camera technology is advancing at such a rate that it may soon catch up to "real" cameras in one critical feature that separates pro shooters from snap shooters: optical zoom.…




  • Leaked photos may indicate slimmer next-generation iPad
    Will iPad Air evolve into iPad Helium?
    Photos have surfaced that purport to show Apple's next iPad having a bonded LCD and front-panel glass display, allowing it to be even thinner than the current 7.5mm (0.29-inch) thick iPad Air – or perhaps the same thickness, but with a larger battery.…


  • Reddit users discover iOS malware threat
    'Unflod Baby Panda' looks to snatch Apple IDs
    Users on a mobile phone hacking subreddit are being credited with the discovery of a malware infection targeting iOS users.…


  • Edward Snowden on his Putin TV appearance: 'Why all the criticism?'
    Denies Q&A cameo was meant to slam US, big-up Russia
    Fugitive whistleblower Edward Snowden has written an op-ed column in the Guardian justifying his decision to go on live TV to question Russian President Vladimir Putin about his country's policies on mass surveillance.…


  • Number crunching suggests Yahoo! US is worth less than nothing
    China and Japan holdings worth more than entire company
    It has been 18 months since former Google golden girl Marissa Mayer took over the helm at Yahoo! and outwardly things look pretty good, but the latest financial analysis shows the Purple Palace might actually be worth less than zero.…


  • Ex–Apple CEO John Sculley: Ousting Steve Jobs 'was a mistake'
    Twenty-nine years later, post-Pepsi exec has flat-forehead moment
    Ex–Apple CEO John Sculley, who engineered Steve Jobs' removal from managing the company's Macintosh division in May 1985 – a move that eventually led Jobs to resign that September – now thinks it may not have been such a good idea.…


  • Spanish village called 'Kill the Jews' mulls rebranding exercise
    Not exactly attractive to the Israeli tourist demographic
    Residents in the Spanish village of Castrillo* Matajudíos (Castrillo Kill the Jews) will vote on Saturday on whether it's time to change the name of their small hamlet in the province of Burgos to something a little less offensive.…



  • Arts and crafts store Michaels says 3 million credit cards exposed in breach
    Meanwhile, Target investigators prepare for long process in nabbing hackers
    As the officials investigating the Target data breach are settling in for what they believe will be a long and complex process of catching the hackers behind the heist, another US retailer is admitting that it lost millions of customer payment card details.…







  • AMD posts $1.4bn in sales, beats Wall Street moneymen's predictions
    Ah, but it's that pesky GAAP v. non-GAAP spread again: net loss of $20m or gain of $12m?
    Updated AMD has announced its financial results for its first fiscal quarter, and the chip designer handily beat analysts' expectations in both revenues and the all-important – to the Wall Street moneymen, at least – earning per share (EPS).…


  • Nokia halts sales of Lumia 2520 Win RT tablet over zap-happy charger
    Crummy cables pose risk of electric shock
    Nokia's Lumia 2520 is one of the few tablets to ship with Windows RT besides Microsoft's own Surface line, but the Finnish firm has now suspended sales of its ARM-based Windows fondleslab in Europe due to issues with its charger.…





  • Samsung, GlobalFoundries ink exclusive, multi-year 14nm FinFET deal
    Customers can 'save literally hundreds of millions of dollars in design costs,' they claim
    Samsung and GlobalFoundries have announced a collaborative agreement that will enable 14-nanometer FinFET chippery to be manufactured at Samsung's fabs in Hwaseong, South Korea and Austin, Texas, as well as at GlobalFoundries' fab in Saratoga, New York.…
















  • Inside the Hekaton: SQL Server 2014's database engine deconstructed
    Nadella's database sqares the circle of cheap memory vs speed
    It's 1996 and Mission:Impossible has just arrived on the cinema screens. RAM is $10 per megabyte and falling. Against this backdrop, Microsoft has quietly commenced its own seemingly impossible mission, a complete re-write of a little known database which will be released two years into the future, and will be known as SQL Server 7.…



  • AWS bins elastic compute units, adopts virtual CPUs
    Customers tired of wrapping their heads around odd computing power metric
    Gartner analyst Kyle Hilgendorf has spotted something very interesting: Amazon Web Services seems to have stopped rating cloud servers based on EC2 compute units (ECUs), its proprietary metric of computing power.…


  • MIT boffins moot tsunami-proof floating nuke power plants
    What could go wrong with that?
    Boffins at MIT have mooted a new concept for nuclear power plants which would see the entire facility towed several miles out to sea and moored in a similar way to offshore oil and gas platforms.…


  • Leaked pics show EMBIGGENED iPhone 6 screen
    Fat-fingered fanbois rejoice over Chinternet snaps
    Fruity toy maker Apple’s next iPhone looks like it will definitely have a significantly bigger screen, if you believe the latest images to have found their way onto the Chinternet.…



  • Oz winemaker/cloud says DEY buy cheaper than vendors' SDS
    Door left open to future productisation
    CloudCentral, the Australian cloud-cum-wine company that this week acquired the intellectual property of software-defined storage (SDS) startup DEY, says the transaction was a cheaper way to build its own SDS than buying it from a vendor.…





Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM