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  • Red Hat: 2015:0080-01: java-1.8.0-oracle: Critical Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated java-1.8.0-oracle packages that fix several security issues are now available for Oracle Java for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Critical security [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2015:0074-01: jasper: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated jasper packages that fix two security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Important security [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2015:0079-01: java-1.7.0-oracle: Critical Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated java-1.7.0-oracle packages that fix several security issues are now available for Oracle Java for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5, 6, and 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Critical security [More...]






  • Red Hat: 2015:0066-01: openssl: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated openssl packages that fix multiple security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Moderate security [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2015:0062-01: kernel: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated kernel packages that fix multiple security issues, several bugs, and add one enhancement are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.5 Extended Update Support. [More...]





  • Attic – Deduplicating backup program
    Attic is a deduplicating backup program written in Python. The main goal of Attic is to provide an efficient and secure way to backup data. The data deduplication technique used makes Attic suitable for daily backups since only the changes are stored.



  • Netrunner 14.1 Screenshot Tour
    This is the release announcement of Netrunner 14.1 Main edition 'Frontier'. The '14.1' indicates an updated and polished release of Netrunner 14 LTS on the same underlying base. Since 14.1 is using the same 'Trusty' base as Netrunner 14, there is no need for users of 14 to migrate; simply updating from the shared backports ppa of the Frontier release cycle should give the same result, while keeping customizations in place. So 14.1 is a fresh starting point for new users who want to install an up-to-date KDE 4-based system from the ISO image. This is the first time we are working on both updating our current LTS base (Frontier), while at the same time preparing the next release, Netrunner 15 (Prometheus), with the upcoming KDE Plasma 5.2.


  • Google makes it easier to run Linux on a Chromebook via a USB drive…sort of…
    I wrote a post recently about how Chromebooks were hurting Microsoft, and now Google has made Chromebooks potentially even more appealing by theoretically making it easier for you to run Linux on them. Developer mode in Chrome OS now offers the option of booting from USB, so it might be possible to boot a Linux distro off a USB drive and run it it on your Chromebook.


  • Dying Light Is Now Confirmed For Linux, Bring It On Techland
    Dying Light is now confirmed for Linux thanks to the announcement from the developers on the Steam store itself. The Linux icons show up on the store pages, and the game even has a steam coming soon banner on the home-page. Time to get seriously excited.


  • Netrunner 14.1 Frontier released
    This is the release announcement of Netrunner 14.1 Main Edition (Frontier) 64bit and 32bit. KDE SC was updated from 4.13 to version 4.14, which improves the new semantic desktop search Baloo which replaced Nepomuk.





  • Top Ten Things Linux Users Say About systemd
    Until now, we thought the days of the Top Ten on FOSS Force were long gone. However, the systemd brouhaha has awakened the inner Top Ten List that has been sleeping within us for all these years. Today, for one day only, the Top Ten List returns for one last encore — or the last one until the next time something tickles us funny.Ladies and gentlemen, from the home office in Omaha, Nebraska, here is this week’s Top Ten List — the top ten things Linux users say about systemd.


  • Linux-enabled sit/stand smart desk nudges you into action
    A Linux-based desk with WiFi, Bluetooth, and a 5-inch touchscreen automatically adjusts between sitting and standing, and tells you when it’s time to move. Talk about good timing: Stir announced its second-generation “Stir Kinetic Desk M1″ smart desk the same week the Annals of Internal Medicine published a report on the health dangers of sitting. […]


  • Armello and Perfect Golf in EA on Steam
    Two more games entered Early Access on Steam during the past couple of days: Armello, a combination of card and board games with role-playing elements, and Perfect Golf, a realistic golf simulator.


  • Google just made it easier to run Linux on your Chromebook
    Coming improvements in Chrome OS will enable easily running Linux directly from a USB stick: "Have you ever installed a full desktop Linux system on your Chromebook? It isn’t all the hard, but it is a bit more complex than it should be. New features in the latest version of Chrome OS will make dipping into an alternative operating system easier. For example, you’ll be able to easily boot a full Linux system from a USB drive and use it without any additional hassle!


  • A new version of Pac Man for the Atari 2600
    ...the version of Pac Man that was released for the Atari 2600 was horrible. I mean truly, incredibly, mind-blowingly awful. The graphics sucked, the sound was abominable and the entire experience was a let-down of absolutely epic proportions. But a programmer has created a new version of Pac Man for the Atari 2600, and it’s what Pac Man should have been when it was first released all those years ago.




  • Linus Torvalds to Patch the Kernel for a Witcher 2 Problem
    Linus Torvalds is not known to interfere with other projects than the Linux kernel and it must be something really special to get him involved. Well, it looks like the Linux port of The Witcher 2: Assassins of Kings proved to be interesting enough.


  • Mea Culpas & Cranky Patients Named Ken
    For starters, I thought the proposal — not Red Hat or the Fedora Project — was the product of “first-world thinkers.” Neither Red Hat nor the Fedora Project needs me to explain the length and breadth of their worldwide community and how they fit within the structure of positively promoting FOSS worldwide. Also, to be clear: My commentary appeared after Stephen’s “let-me-explain” blog post, by a matter of minutes incidentally, so there was no cause-and-effect involved on my part.



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  • Don't Count Out The Anti-Establishment Republicans
    The political chattering classes are obsessed with the battle for the establishment choice for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination: Jeb Bush, Mitt Romney or throw in a little Chris Christie. Yet there is an equally interesting, and perhaps as important, struggle for the movement-conservative or non-establishment crown.


  • Facebook Needs A 'Sympathy' Button
    Facebook has a problem. As it's grown, the social network has omitted sophisticated ways for users to interact with each other's content, giving options only to "Like," share or comment.










  • Here's A New Method For Opening Your Beer: Your Bottom
    You've probably seen videos of people opening beer bottles with their eye sockets, but you may have never seen someone opening a bottle with their buttocks. Well, now you can.  [Warning: the sound is pretty loud, so turn down the volume]










  • Searching For Sex
    Call it everything you always wanted to know about sex, but didn’t have the data to ask.





  • Man Trapped In Constant Deja Vu
    Scientists believe the extraordinary case of a 23-year-old British man with "constant deja vu" may have been triggered by anxiety. It is the first time such a link has been made. But what is deja vu — and do we really know what causes it?




  • The Strangely Competitive World Of Sci-Fi Writing Workshops
    Each summer budding authors flock to writing workshops like Clarion, Clarion West, and Odyssey. For many students, the experience proves invaluable, giving them the tools they need to finally break into magazines like Lightspeed after years of trying.








  • Feminism's 'Ends Justifies The Means' Argument In Rape Culture
    Laws that offer special protections to women based on their difference from men have a habit of redounding to women’s disadvantage. In the case of affirmative consent, the payback is readily apparent: women are deemed to have limited agency in their sexual relations with men, so men are designated as their sexual guardians — occasionally overruling their stated wishes when they’ve had too much to drink



  • Season Of The Witch
    The rallying cry of “misandry” brought women together. Where do we go next?


  • Tracking 125,000 Incidents Of Global Terrorism
    Soon after the terrorist attacks in Paris earlier this month, a researcher at the University of Maryland at College Park carefully logged the details of the violence (location, names of the perpetrators, weapons used, number of fatalities). The attacks became new entries in the Global Terrorism Database, a comprehensive clearinghouse of terrorist acts around the world.




  • A Deep Dive Into The 'Royal Rumble'
    When it started in 1988, the "Royal Rumble" was a gimmick — a battle royal slightly reconfigured to create a trademarked event that would sell tickets regardless of its participants. Today, of course, the men (and occasional women) are what the match is built on — the big names, the big entrances, and the career implications that accompany the outcomes.


  • Our France
    Following the terrorist attacks in Paris, how does it feel to be a Muslim in France?


  • An Accurate Depiction Of Cyclocross
    On paper, cyclocross is a cycling sport where dozens of riders ride around in parks and empty fields, occasionally jumping off their bikes to run up steep hills, over barriers or other riders. In practice, cyclocross is a giant shitshow where the riders are in constant danger of flinging themselves off their machines in new and interesting ways — as demonstrated here.


  • Bolivian Ball
    Travis Dupree comes from Eastman, a small town in central Georgia. He played basketball at Voorhees College in South Carolina but after graduation, found himself with no opportunities to play professionally. So like a lot of players in his position, he went to play abroad.








  • The Modern Archer Who Can Fire Three Arrows In 0.6 Seconds
    Lars Andersen is a master of the bow. Besides incredible speed, he can jump, catch an arrow in the air and fire it back before landing. Watch your back, Legolas. (He fires three arrows in 0.6 seconds at 5:15 into the video, but trust us, the rest is worth a watch).


  • Anonymous Asks Activists To Fight Pedophiles In 'Operation Deatheaters'
    HughPickens.com writes The Independent reports that hacktivist group Anonymous, in a project named Operation DeathEaters, is calling for help in its fight against international pedophile networks, or what it calls the "paedosadist industry" and has issued a video instructing activists on how they can aid in the operation. The Anonymous project is intended to break what it says is a conspiracy of silence among sympathetic politicians, police and mainstream media to downplay the full extent of the online child sex industry. "The premise behind OpDeathEaters is to expose high level complicity, obstruction of justice and cover-up in the paedo-sadist industry in order to show the need for independent inquiries," says Heather Marsh, an online activist who is helping to co-ordinate the operation and describes herself as an "old friend" of Anonymous. The Anonymous database, which will be hosted on the GitHub online repository, promises to collate cases from all around the world, cross-referencing connections within sub-groups including the police, armed forces, schoolteachers, politicians, media, academics and religious organisations. The database's ultimate purpose has yet to be fully determined, but in the first instance the group says it wants to shut down the child-sex industry by "dismantling the power structure which held it there" and by "educating to create a cultural change". The group is calling on volunteers to help with the ongoing work, which has been divided into three steps. The first is about collecting "all the factual information," second is to "share that information as widely as possible," and the third step is "to set up an independent, internationally linked, inquiry into all the areas which do not appear to have been investigated properly." Activists point to the muted media coverage given to a recent case in Washington DC in which Michael Centanni, a senior Republican fundraiser, was charged with child sex offences after investigators traced transmissions of child pornography to his computers in his basement. The case was not covered by The Washington Post or the New York Times, and was only picked up by a local NBC affiliate state and The Washington Examiner, a small conservative paper in the city. According to the court filings, Centanni was found in possession of 3,000 images, many apparently filmed in his own bedroom, including one showing a man raping a five-year-old girl who cries "no" and "mommy" while the man says "good baby" and "stop crying," according to one filing.







  • Ed Felten: California Must Lead On Cybersecurity
    An anonymous reader writes In a Sacramento Bee op-ed, (in)famous computer security researcher Ed Felten responds to the State of the Union cybersecurity proposal. He doesn't mince words: "The odds of clearing Congress: low. The odds of materially improving security: even lower. "What he suggests as an alternative, though, is a surprise. "California," he writes, "could blaze a trail for effective cybersecurity policy." He calls for the state government to protect critical infrastructure and sensitive data, relying on outside auditors and experts. It's an interesting idea. Even if it doesn't go anywhere, at least it's some fresh thinking in this area of backward policy. From Felten's essay: Critical infrastructure increasingly relies on industrial automation systems. And those systems are often vulnerable – they keep a default password, for instance, or are accessible from the public Internet. These are not subtle or sophisticated errors. Fixing them requires basic due diligence, not rocket science. Requiring the state’s critical infrastructure providers to undergo regular security audits would be straightforward and inexpensive – especially relative to the enormous risks. Areas of sensitive data are also low-hanging cyber fruit. In health care, education and finance, California already imposes security and privacy requirements that go beyond federal law. Those legal mandates, though, are mostly enforced through after-the-fact penalties. Much like critical infrastructure, sectors that rely upon sensitive data would benefit from periodic outside auditing. Of any state government's, California's policies also have the chance to help (or harm) the most people: nearly 39 million people, according to a 2014 U.S. Census estimate.







  • SpaceX, US Air Force Settle Spy Sat Dispute
    hypnosec writes The US Air Force and private space flight company SpaceX have settled their dispute involving the military's expendable rocket program, thereby paving the way for SpaceX to join the spy satellite launch program known as Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV). The settlement opens doors for SpaceX to compete with United Launch Alliance (ULA) for launch of spy satellites. ULA is a joint Boeing-Lockheed venture – the only private player to have received clearance for launching black ops satellites.







  • DirectX 12 Lies Dormant Within Microsoft's Recent Windows 10 Update
    MojoKid writes After last Wednesday's Windows 10 event, early adopters and IT types were probably anxious for Microsoft to release the next preview build. Fortunately, it didn't take long as it came out on Friday, and it's safe to say that it introduced even more than many were anticipating (but still no Spartan browser). However, in case you missed it, DirectX 12 is actually enabled in this Windows 10 release, though unfortunately we'll need to wait for graphics drivers and apps that support it, to take advantage of DX 12 features and performance enhancements.







  • A Call That Made History, 100 Years Ago Today
    alphadogg writes These days, making a call across the U.S. is so easy that people often don't even know they're talking coast to coast. But 100 years ago Sunday, it took a hackathon, a new technology and an international exposition to make it happen. The first commercial transcontinental phone line opened on Jan. 25, 1915, with a call from New York to the site of San Francisco's Panama-Pacific International Exposition. Alexander Graham Bell made the call to his assistant, Thomas Watson. Just 39 years earlier, Bell had talked to Watson on the first ever phone call, in Boston, just after Bell had patented the telephone.







  • Fish Found Living Half a Mile Under Antarctic Ice
    BarbaraHudson (3785311) writes "Researchers were startled to find fish, crustaceans and jellyfish investigating a submersible camera after drilling through nearly 2,500 feet (740 meters) of Antarctic ice. The swimmers are in one of the world's most extreme ecosystems, hidden beneath the Ross Ice Shelf, roughly 530 miles (850 kilometers) from the open ocean. "This is the closest we can get to something like Europa," said Slawek Tulaczyk, a glaciologist at the University of California, Santa Cruz and a chief scientist on the drilling project. More pictures here."







  • Ask Slashdot: Is Pascal Underrated?
    An anonymous reader writes In the recent Slashdot discussion on the D programming language, I was surprised to see criticisms of Pascal that were based on old information and outdated implementations. While I'm sure that, for example, Brian Kernighan's criticisms of Pascal were valid in 1981, things have moved on since then. Current Object Pascal largely addresses Kernighan's critique and also includes language features such as anonymous methods, reflection and attributes, class helpers, generics and more (see also Marco Cantu's recent Object Pascal presentation). Cross-platform development is fairly straightforward with Pascal. Delphi targets Windows, OS X, iOS and Android. Free Pascal targets many operating systems and architectures and Lazarus provides a Delphi-like IDE for Free Pascal. So what do you think? Is Pascal underrated?







  • Fark's Drew Curtis Running For Governor of Kentucky
    New submitter AlCapwn writes [Fark founder] Drew Curtis announced on Friday that he will be running for governor of Kentucky. "We have a theory that we're about to see a huge change in how elections and politics work. Across the country, we have seen regular citizens stepping up and challenging the status quo built by political parties and career politicians. They have been getting closer and closer to victory and, here in Kentucky, we believe we have a chance to win and break the political party stronghold for good."







  • Why We Still Can't Really Put Anything In the Public Domain
    Press2ToContinue writes While you can make a public domain dedication or (more recently) use the Creative Commons CC0 tool to do so, there's no clear way within the law to actually declare something in the public domain. Instead, the public domain declarations are really more of a promise not to make use of the exclusionary rights provided under copyright. On the "public domain day" of Copyright Week, Public Knowledge has pointed out that it's time that it became much easier to put things into the public domain. Specifically, the PK post highlights that thanks to the way copyright termination works, even someone who puts their works into the public domain could pull them back out of the public domain after 35 years.







  • Calif. DMV Back-Pedals On Commercial-Plate Mandate For Ride-Share Drivers
    The San Francisco Chronicle reports that In an abrupt U-turn, the California Department of Motor Vehicles late Friday retracted its finding that drivers for ride-hailing services like Uber, Lyft and Sidecar must obtain commercial license plates. That determination — based on a 1935 state law — ignited a firestorm of criticism from the San Francisco startups and their supporters as stifling innovation. Commercial licenses are cumbersome to obtain, meaning they could impede the companies’ growth, which relies on getting new drivers, many of whom work just part time, into service quickly. And commercial registration probably would have necessitated that drivers get commercial insurance, which is significantly more expensive than personal auto insurance. Republican Assembly members threatened legislation over the “nonsensical” interpretation if the DMV didn’t reconsider its stance before Feb. 17. Now the department says it will do just that. That doesn't mean drivers for companies like Uber and Lyft can expect to be left alone by the DMV, though, which according to the article "will meet with regulators and the industry to work through the issue."







  • Ask Slashdot: GPU of Choice For OpenCL On Linux?
    Bram Stolk writes So, I am running GNU/Linux on a modern Haswell CPU, with an old Radeon HD5xxx from 2009. I'm pretty happy with the open source Gallium driver for 3D acceleration. But now I want to do some GPGPU development using OpenCL on this box, and the old GPU will no longer cut it. What do my fellow technophiles from Slashdot recommend as a replacement GPU? Go NVIDIA, go AMD, or just use the integrated Intel GPU instead? Bonus points for open sourced solutions. Performance not really important, but OpenCL driver maturity is.







  • NASA Considers Autonomous Martian Helicopter To Augment Future Rovers
    SternisheFan (2529412) writes with this story at the Verge about an approach being considered by NASA to overcome some of the difficulties in moving a wheeled or multi-legged ground vehicle around the surface of Mars, which has proven to be a difficult task. Rover teams still have a tough time with the Martian surface even though they're flush with terrestrial data. The alien surface is uneven, and ridges and valleys make navigating the terrain difficult. The newest solution proposed by JPL is the Mars Helicopter, an autonomous drone that could 'triple the distances that Mars rovers can drive in a Martian day,' according to NASA. The helicopter would fly ahead of a rover when its view is blocked and send Earth-bound engineers the right data to plan the rover's route.







  • Brought To You By the Letter R: Microsoft Acquiring Revolution Analytics
    theodp writes Maybe Bill Gates' Summer Reading this year will include The Art of R Programming. Pushing further into Big Data, Microsoft on Friday announced it's buying Revolution Analytics, the top commercial provider of software and services for the open-source R programming language for statistical computing and predictive analytics. "By leveraging Revolution Analytics technology and services," blogged Microsoft's Joseph Sirosh, "we will empower enterprises, R developers and data scientists to more easily and cost effectively build applications and analytics solutions at scale." Revolution Analytics' David Smith added, "Now, Microsoft might seem like a strange bedfellow for an open-source company [RedHat:Linux as Revolution Analytics:R], but the company continues to make great strides in the open-source arena recently." Now that it has Microsoft's blessing, is it finally time for AP Statistics to switch its computational vehicle to R?







  • Americans Support Mandatory Labeling of Food That Contains DNA
    HughPickens.com writes Jennifer Abel writes at the LA Times that according to a recent survey (PDF), over 80% of Americans says they support "mandatory labels on foods containing DNA," roughly the same number that support the mandatory labeling of GMO foods "produced with genetic engineering." Ilya Somin, writing about the survey at the Washington Post, suggested that a mandatory label for foods containing DNA might sound like this: "WARNING: This product contains deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). The Surgeon General has determined that DNA is linked to a variety of diseases in both animals and humans. In some configurations, it is a risk factor for cancer and heart disease. Pregnant women are at very high risk of passing on DNA to their children." The report echoes a well-known joke/prank wherein people discuss the dangers of the chemical "dihydrogen monoxide" also known as hydrogen oxide and hydrogen hydroxide. Search online for information about dihydrogen monoxide, and you'll find a long list of scary-sounding and absolutely true warnings about it: the nuclear power industry uses enormous quantities of it every year. Dihydrogen monoxide is used in the production of many highly toxic pesticides, and chemical weapons banned by the Geneva Conventions. Dihydrogen monoxide is found in all tumors removed from cancer patients, and is guaranteed fatal to humans in large quantities and even small quantities can kill you, if it enters your respiratory system. In 2006, in Louisville, Kentucky, David Karem, executive director of the Waterfront Development Corporation, a public body that operates Waterfront Park, wished to deter bathers from using a large public fountain. "Counting on a lack of understanding about water's chemical makeup," he arranged for signs reading: "DANGER! – WATER CONTAINS HIGH LEVELS OF HYDROGEN – KEEP OUT" to be posted on the fountain at public expense.







  • Europe and China Will Team Up For a Robotic Space Mission
    Taco Cowboy writes with this excerpt from Space.com: On Monday (Jan. 19), the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and the European Space Agency (ESA) issued a call for proposals for a robotic space mission that the two organizations will develop jointly. "The goal of the present Call is to define a scientific space mission to be implemented by ESA and CAS as a cooperative endeavor between the European and Chinese scientific communities," ESA officials wrote in a statement Monday. "The mission selected as an outcome of the present Joint Call will follow a collaborative approach through all the phases: study, definition, implementation, operations and scientific exploitation." The call envisions a low-budget mission, saying that ESA and CAS are each prepared to contribute about 53 million euros (U.S. $61.5 million at current exchange rates). The spacecraft must weigh less than 661 lbs. (300 kilograms) at launch and be designed to operate for at least two to three years, ESA officials wrote in the call for proposals. All proposals are due by March 16, and the peer-review process will start in April. Mission selection is expected to occur in late 2015, followed by six years of development, with a launch in 2021.







  • Doomsday Clock Moved Two Minutes Forward, To 23:57
    An anonymous reader writes As reported by CNN and Time, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists has moved their famed Doomsday Clock two minutes closer to midnight. Now at 23:57, this clock attempts to personify humanity's closeness to a global catastrophe (as caused by either climate change or nuclear war). According to the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, this change is due to a lack of action regarding climate issues, the continued existence of nuclear weapon stockpiles, and the increased animosity that now exists between the United States and Russia.







  • Twitter Moves To Curb Instagram Links
    Hammeh writes According to a report on Mashable, Twitter have sent out messages to some of their high profile users prompting them to share images using Twitter's own service rather than Instagram links. The news comes 2 years since Instagram pulled support for Twitter cards and has been part of the continuing battle between the two social networks. With Instagram now having overtaken Twitter in terms of users, this may be a move to try and use high profile users to show off Twitter's own image and content tools.







  • In Addition To Project Spartan, Windows 10 Will Include Internet Explorer
    An anonymous reader writes After unveiling its new Project Spartan browser for Windows 10, Microsoft is now offering more details. The company confirmed that Windows 10 will also include Internet Explorer for enterprise sites, though it didn't say how exactly this will work. Spartan comes with a new rendering engine, which doesn't rely on the versioned document modes the company has historically used. It also provides compatibility with the millions of existing enterprise websites specifically designed for Internet Explorer by loading the IE11 engine when needed. In this way, the browser uses the new rendering engine for modern websites and the old one for legacy purposes.







  • OpenSSL 1.0.2 Released
    kthreadd writes The OpenSSL project has released its second feature release of the OpenSSL 1.0 series, version 1.0.2 which is ABI compatible with the 1.0.0 and 1.0.1 series. Major new features in this release include Suite B support for TLS 1.2 and DTLS 1.2 and support for DTLS 1.2. selection. Other major changes include TLS automatic EC curve selection, an API to set TLS supported signature algorithms and curves, the SSL_CONF configuration API, support for TLS Brainpool, support for ALPN and support for CMS support for RSA-PSS, RSA-OAEP, ECDH and X9.42 DH.







  • Bomb Threats Via Twitter Partly Shut Down Atlanta's Hartsfield Airport
    The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports that "Credible" bomb threats were made Saturday against two flights bound for Atlanta, an airport spokesman said. The flights landed safely after being escorted into Atlanta by military fighter jets. Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport spokesman Reese McCrainie told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution at 3 p.m. that both flights — Delta 1156 and Southwest 2492 — had landed and were sitting on a taxiway waiting to be swept by the Atlanta police Bomb Squad. ... Witnesses reported seeing multiple emergency vehicles on the tarmac, and the Federal Aviation Administration said just before 3 p.m. that departing flights were experiencing gate holds and delays of up to 30 minutes due to a bomb threat. USA Today says that the flights were on their way to Atlanta from, respectively, Portland, Oregon and Milwaukee, and adds that "NORAD Media Relations Specialist Preston Schlachter confirmed that two F-16 jets launched from McIntire Air Force Base in South Carolina as a precautionary measure."









  • Oi, Aussie sports fans! Take that selfie stick and stick it
    Tennis and cycling events give Narcissism the flick
    If you think selfie sticks are a sign of society's descent into a slough of narcissism, get thee to Australia where organisers of sporting events are making it know the telescoping terrors aren't entirely welcome.…





  • Ex Machina – a smart, suspenseful satire of our technology gods
    Garland's riveting thriller takes fresh look at AI
    Film review It’s not easy to say something new about artificial intelligence in the movies. It’s pretty much a toss-up between the they-could-be-people-too argument of sweet child robot David in A.I. or the sphincter-tightening terror of HAL and the Terminator. But with Ex Machina, we get a more complex picture of our android future packaged in a wickedly smart and funny film that sends up our technology gods at the same time.…


  • Landlines: The tech that just won't die
    Do we have any choice about paying for home phone numbers?
    Feature For a huge number of Brits, mobiles have become our primary way of communicating, even when we're at home. When a call comes in, we know it's ours. We can reply with a text, or use apps like WhatsApp to communicate with friends abroad. Increasingly, we don't rely on our landline phones and, thanks to lax policing of the Telephone Preference Service (TPS), for many of us, about the only thing they're used for is receiving unsolicited junk calls, or as a safety net so we can call 999 in an emergency.…









  • Broadmoor: My Journey Into Hell, The Chimes and Cowboys and Indies
    Memoirs of a bad mad lag and patchy record biz retrospective
    Page File El Reg bookworm Mark Diston peruses the pick of publishing this week with a début novel from Anna Smaill whose musicality abounds in the post-apocalyptic tale. Back in the real world, one man apocalypse Charles Bronson tells more tales of life inside, and finally Gareth Murphy tracks the history of the music industry.


  • YOU. Your women are mine. Give them to me. I want to sell them
    YouTube's copyright killjoy bots amok
    Something for the Weekend, Sir? A friend of mine had his wife stolen three times this week. The first two times, they gave her back within hours. On the third occasion, however, they seemed determined to hold on to her for a month.…




  • MASSIVE ASTEROID to PLAY CHICKEN with Earth on Monday
    Biggest traveling rock visitor until 2027
    NASA has warned skywatchers that a huge asteroid will pass over European and North American skies on Monday and that this will be the biggest space rock to do a fly-by of our planet until 2027.…


  • Google offers cloudy port for Docker container images
    Park your images on the same storage your app uses
    Google has expanded its support for Docker-based Linux containers on its Cloud Platform, with the addition of a new, cloud-based hosting service for private container registries.…


  • Dot-com is dead. Long live dot-com
    Reports of domain king's death greatly exaggerated
    As you probably know, the internet's domain names are dominated by a single three-letter ending: "com".…



  • Planning to upgrade your Lumia to Windows 10? Well ... not so fast
    Microsoft now says 'not every phone' will make the transition
    The latest word from Microsoft is that owners of Windows Phone 8 handsets won't necessarily be able to upgrade to Windows Phone 10 after all, in an apparent retreat from what the software giant has said previously.…


  • Someone paid $85,000 for hated GLITTER BOMB FACTORY
    Viral site fetches gonzo sale price in auction
    We are all in the wrong business, it seems. An Australian man has just made himself an $85,000 payout selling a site that sends out packets glitter after only a few weeks of operations.…



  • Atlas unplugged! DARPA's unTerminator robot cuts the power cable
    Google's new humanoid machine also comes with a kill-switch
    Atlas, the 6ft 2in (1.88m), 345lb (156kg) humanoid machine being used in the DARPA Robotics Challenge (DRC), has had an extensive upgrade and is now free to roam on battery power alone, the defense research group has said.…


  • ICANN orders re-evaluation of dot-gay
    But it may still not be gay enough
    ICANN has ordered that the application for the dot-gay top-level domain be re-evaluated after 54 letters in support of it "inadvertently" fell through the cracks.…






  • Microsoft: We bought Skype. We make mobiles.. Oh, HANG ON!
    EUREKA! We should put the two together
    Analysis Microsoft has given us a glimpse of Windows progress this week – and it was generally well received – particularly the one-year "grace period" allowing Windows 7 holdouts to climb on board for free.…


  • Doomsday Clock says 3 MINUTES to MIDNIGHT, again
    A bit of a wind-up?
    +Comment The famous Doomsday Clock, which has been showing anywhere between 17 and two minutes to midnight since 1947, has advanced to three-minutes-to for the third time – on this occasion due to a perceived increase in the menace from human-driven climate change.…








  • Developers, developers, developers! But WILL they support Windows 10?
    HoloLens is sexy, but Microsoft faces a battle to win devs' hearts and minds
    Analysis Microsoft has revealed more of its plans for Windows 10, with full release expected towards the end of 2015. The press event focused on eye-catching features like HoloLens, a virtual reality and augmented reality headset, but what really counts is this: will Windows 10 attract developers back to the Windows platform?…



  • UK Scouts database 'flaws' raise concerns
    System holds records of ALL scouts in the country
    Updated Serious concerns have been raised over the security of the Scout Association's database, which holds the contact details of 450,000 young people and volunteer adults, The Register can reveal.…







  • Symantec data centre security software has security holes
    Stop face-palming and start patching - the fixes are out there
    Security bod Stefan Viehböck has detailed holes in Symantec's data centre security platforms that the company plugged this week because they allowed hackers to gain privilege access to management servers.…


  • Never mind those touch apps, full Office 2016 is coming this year
    Both Windows and OS X to get desktop suite revamps in 2015
    Microsoft let slip a few more details of its plans for the company's Office productivity suite on Thursday, including hints about when we can expect the next major version of its desktop suite to land.…


Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM