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  • Red Hat: 2016:1098-01: jq: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for jq is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 6.0 (Juno) for RHEL 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2016:1099-01: jq: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for jq is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 7.0 (Kilo) for RHEL 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact [More...]



  • Red Hat: 2016:1096-01: kernel: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update for kernel is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.4 Advanced Update Support. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact [More...]











  • Empower SMTP With Postscreen: Part 1
    I recently read with interest that the powerful mail transfer agent (MTA) that is Postfix has introduced a relatively new addition to its load mitigation and anti-spam arsenal.


  • OpenSUSE Administation with Zypper
    This tutorial shows the steps to install and update OpenSUSE packages with Zypper. Zypper is the command line package manager for openSUSE, introduced in openSUSE 10.2 which uses the libzypp library. Zypper provides a command line interface to manage repositories, the software installation, packages, patches, verifying dependencies etc.


  • Getting started with Espruino, a JavaScript interpreter for microcontrollers
    If you've used microcontrollers like the Arduino before, you might be used to pushing compiled code onto the device and then just hoping it does what it's supposed to. The chip is literally a black box: If you don't add print statements (or they don't get a chance to execute), you'll have no idea what your code is doing (or even if it's doing anything at all).read more



  • Additional YUM Repositories for CentOS, RHEL & Fedora Systems
    Additional YUM Repositories will help users to install packages easily to CentOS, RHEL & Fedora Systems from third party repository such as ELRepo, IUS Community Repository, EPEL Repository, REMI Repository, Repoforg Repository, RPMforge Repository, RPMFusion Repository, Ulyaoth Repository


  • Nelum-Dev1 Xfce Screenshot Tour
    Nelum-Dev1-Xfce 2016-05-20 is available. Nelum-Dev1 offers users a live disc with a desktop environment which is based on the Devuan distribution.


  • Google Goes On The Offensive Against Troll Armed With Old Mp3 Player Patent
    It wasn't enough that Creative Labs/Creative Technology spent March 24th suing almost every big name in the cell phone business for patent infringement. These lawsuits, all filed in the East Texas patent troll playground, asserted the same thing: that any smartphone containing a music app (which is every smartphone produced) violates the patent it was granted in 2005 to use in conjunction with its mp3 players. "Venue is proper" because smartphones are sold in Texas, even if the plaintiffs are located in California and Singapore, respectively.That wasn't all Creative Technology did. It also filed a complaint with the US International Trade Commission seeking to block the import of smartphones from manufacturers like Sony, LG, BlackBerry, Samsung, etc. under the theory that every imported phone contains patent-infringing software.


  • 90 days of Android sales almost top nine months of Windows 10 sales
    New mobile market share data has Google's OS on 84 per cent, WinPho on 0.7 per centMicrosoft has trumpeted the fact that 300 million devices now run Windows 10, but the scale of its failure to extend its operating system dominance into mobile can be seen in the fact that of the 349 million smartphones sold in 2016's first quarter, 293.7m ran Android. And just 2.4m ran Windows Phone.…



  • Tiny IoT-oriented i.MX6 UL module includes Linux BSP
    Digi unveiled a tiny, “ConnectCore 6UL” COM combining the NXP i.MX6 UL with 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.1, industrial temp support, and TrustFence security. Digi International’s ConnectCore for i.MX 6UL, or ConnectCore 6UL, appears to be the smallest computer-on-module to date running NXP’s year-old, IoT-oriented i.MX6 UltraLite system-on-chip. The device debuts a patent-pending Digi SMTplus surface mount […]


  • Google’s closing argument: Android was built from scratch, the fair way
    "This is a very important case, not only for Google but for innovation and technology in general," Van Nest told the jury. "What Google engineers did was nothing out of that mainstream. They built Android from scratch, using new Google technology, and adapted technology from open sources. Android was a remarkable thing, a brand-new platform for innovation."





  • Linux 4.7 Gets a Security Boost with ChromeOS Feature
    We're currently inside of the two week merge window where code is being pulled in to form the Linux 4.7 kernel. One of the GIT pull requests came from Linux kernel developer James Morris and includes at least one really interesting new security feature




  • Budgie-Remix 16.04 Screenshot Tour
    Budgie-Remix 16.04 is available. Budgie-Remix is a distribution which combines the Budgie desktop environment (produced by the Solus project) with the base packages from Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.


  • ChaletOS 16.04 Screencast and Screenshots
    What is new in new release of ChaletOS? New LTS support, new kernel and new Software Center. But beside that, with what is ChaletOS so different from other distributions? Themes are improved so they can work with GTK3 and GTK2 engine. Also, now they are more complete, and include details for many applications. Icons are redesigned. We used Emerald icons and we redesigned them so they are more suitable for ChaletOS style. Style Changer is rewritten and templates are made from scratch. Many community derived Conky styles are rewritten and adapted for ChaletOS.


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  • A Full Revolution
    In the run-up to the Olympics, Simone Biles is transforming gymnastics.




  • These Are Some Next-Level Loafers
    Made with hand-cut, breathable leather and a cushioned insole, Nisolo has designed a modern (and comfy) take on the classic penny loafer. Designed in Nashville and ethically produced in Peru, each pair is made with local materials by local artisans.













  • The People Who Store Their Emotions In Their Fingertips
    In some rare cases, the link between touch and emotion can take some strange and extreme turns. Imagine being so disgusted by denim, for example, that running a hand over jeans makes you want to puke. Or feeling the urge to laugh whenever you touch silk.


  • How Do Stealth Aircraft Work?
    The B-2 Stealth Bomber has a 52 meter wing span but the same radar cross section as a large bird. How in the hell did they engineer this thing to be so sneaky?




  • Interested In Learning Design?
    Oh, you are? Well that’s convenient because here’s access to more than 200 hours of expert instruction on design, computer animation and game development.





  • Late BMX Legend Dave Mirra Had CTE
    Mirra is the first action sports athlete to be diagnosed with chronic traumatic encephalopathy, a neurodegenerative disease that can lead to dementia, memory loss and depression. He died on Feb. 4 from a self-inflicted gunshot wound.













  • VR Music Videos From The '90s Were Amazing
    VR is all the rage now, but the VR music video was actually born at least 20 years ago, and like a lot of '90s VR, the early examples of it are utterly surreal and sort of amazing.






  • Google Now Handles At Least 2 Trillion Searches Per Year
    Danny Sullivan, reporting for Search Engine Land: How many searches per year happen on Google? After nearly four years, the company has finally released an updated figure today of "trillions" per year. How many trillions, exactly, Google wouldn't say. Consider two trillion the starting point. Google did confirm to Search Engine Land that because it said it handles "trillions" of searches per year worldwide, the figure could be safely assumed to be two trillion or above. Is it more than two trillion? Google could be doing five trillion searches per year. Or 10 trillion. Or 100 trillion. Or presumably up to 999 trillion, because if it were 1,000 trillion, you'd expect Google would announce that it does a quadrillion searches per year.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • American Scientists Working On Creating Chimeras: Half-Human, Half-Animal Embryos
    Researchers at the University of California, Davis are working on creating half-human, half-animal hybrid embryos dubbed chimeras to better understand diseases and its progression. But not everybody is thrilled about it. IBTimes reports: One of the aims of the experiment using chimeras is to create farm animals with human organs. The body parts could then be harvested and transplanted into very sick people. However, a number of bioethicists and scientists frown on the creation of interspecies embryos which they believe crosses the line. New York Medical College Professor of Cell Biology and Anatomy Stuart Newman calls the use of chimeras as entering unsettling ground which damages "our sense of humanity." They are not alone in voicing their opinion against the idea. Huffington Post adds: The project is so controversial that the National Institutes of Health has refused to fund it. The researchers are relying on private donors. Critics of these experiments say they are too risky because there is no way of knowing where the human stem cells will go. Will they just become a pancreas? Or could they become a brain? And if they become a brain, will the pigs who house them have human consciousness?
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • No, Apple Won't Become a Wireless Carrier
    Don Reisinger, reporting for Fortune: Apple won't be competing with its carrier partners anytime soon. Speaking at Startup Fest Europe in Amsterdam during an interview on Tuesday, Apple CEO Tim Cook squashed rumors that his company is planning to eventually get into the cellular market to compete with the likes of AT&T and Verizon. "Our expertise doesn't extend to the network," Cook said. "We've worked with AT&T in the U.S., O2 in the U.K., as well as T-Mobile and Orange, and we expanded as we learned more. But generally, the things Apple likes to do, are things we can do globally. We don't have the network skill. We'll do some things along the way with e-SIMs along the way, but in general, I like the things carriers do."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Beware Of Keystroke Loggers Disguised As USB Phone Chargers, FBI Warns
    An anonymous reader cites an article on Ars Technica: FBI officials are warning private industry partners to be on the lookout for highly stealthy keystroke loggers that surreptitiously sniff passwords and other input typed into wireless keyboards. The FBI's Private Industry Notification (PDF) comes more than 15 months after whitehat hacker Samy Kamkar released a KeySweeper, a proof-of-concept attack platform that covertly logged and decrypted keystrokes from many Microsoft-branded wireless keyboards and transmitted the data over cellular networks. To lower the chances that the sniffing device might be discovered by a target, Kamkar designed it to look almost identical to USB phone chargers that are nearly ubiquitous in homes and offices."If placed strategically in an office or other location where individuals might use wireless devices, a malicious cyber actor could potentially harvest personally identifiable information, intellectual property, trade secrets, passwords, or other sensitive information," FBI officials wrote in last month's advisory. "Since the data is intercepted prior to reaching the CPU, security managers may not have insight into how sensitive information is being stolen."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Too Fat For Facebook: Photo Banned For Depicting Body In 'Undesirable Manner'
    An anonymous reader shares a report on The Guardian: Facebook has apologized for banning a photo of a plus-sized model and telling the feminist group that posted the image that it depicts "body parts in an undesirable manner". Cherchez la Femme, an Australian group that hosts popular culture talkshows with "an unapologetically feminist angle", said Facebook rejected an advert featuring Tess Holliday, a plus-sized model wearing a bikini, telling the group it violated the company's "ad guidelines". After the group appealed against the rejection, Facebook's ad team initially defended the decision, writing that the photo failed to comply with the social networking site's "health and fitness policy". "Ads may not depict a state of health or body weight as being perfect or extremely undesirable," Facebook wrote. "Ads like these are not allowed since they make viewers feel bad about themselves. Instead, we recommend using an image of a relevant activity, such as running or riding a bike." In a statement on Monday, Facebook apologized for its original stance and said it had determined that the photo does comply with its guidelines.Facebook said that its team scans millions of ad images every week, and sometimes understandably misses out on a few.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • China's Huawei Sues Samsung Claiming Mobile Patent Infringement
    An anonymous reader writes: Huawei said on Wednesday it has filed lawsuits against Samsung claiming infringement of smartphone patents, in the first such case by the Chinese firm against the world's biggest mobile maker. Huawei has filed lawsuits in the United States and China seeking compensation for what it said was unlicensed use of fourth-generation (4G) cellular communications technology, operating systems and user interface software in Samsung phones. The lawsuit marks a reversal of roles in China where firms have often been on the receiving end of patent infringement disputes. In smartphones, makers have grown rapidly in recent years but different intellectual property laws outside of China have slowed overseas expansion. "We hope Samsung will ... stop infringing our patents and get the necessary license from Huawei, and work together with Huawei to jointly drive the industry forward," Ding Jianxing, president of Huawei's Intellectual Property Rights Department, said.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Windows 10 Upgrade Activates By Clicking Red X Close Button In Prompt Message
    Reader Raging Bool writes: In a move guaranteed to annoy many people, Microsoft has "jumped the shark" on encouraging users to upgrade to Windows 10. Microsoft has faced criticism for changing the pop-up box encouraging Windows users to upgrade to Windows 10. Clicking the red cross on the right hand corner of the pop-up box now activates the upgrade instead of closing the box. And this has caused confusion as typically clicking a red cross closes a pop-up notification. The upgrade could still be cancelled, when the scheduled time for it to begin appeared, Microsoft said The change occurred because the update is now labelled "recommended" and many people have their PCs configured to accept recommended updates for security reasons. This means dismissing the box does not dismiss the update.Brad Chacos, senior editor at the PC World wrote about this incident over the weekend, and described it as a "nasty trick".
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Pebble Unveils Pebble 2, Pebble Time 2, and Pebble Core Smartwatches
    Pebble on Tuesday unveiled its latest line of wearable devices. The company announced the Pebble 2 -- a sleeker successor to the company's four-year-old Pebble watch -- and the Pebble Time 2, which comes with a large colour display and steel frame. Both the devices are up on Kickstarter, and scheduled to be shipped later this year. The company also announced the Pebble Core, a square-shaped timepiece which supports 3G, GPS, and Bluetooth connections and lets users stream music using Spotify and make emergency calls without the need of a smartphone. The Pebble 2 and the Pebble Time 2 come equipped with heart-rate sensors, a feature that was missing from the earlier Pebble smartwatches. The Pebble Core runs Android 5.0 Lollipop, and also has a 4GB storage which users can use when they don't have a flash drive in handy. The Pebble 2 is priced at $99, whereas the Pebble Time 2 will cost you $169. The Pebble Core is priced at $69. Pebble's new devices will be up on Kickstarter for 36 days, should you feel the urge to support the company. However, it is worth noting that in within hours, Pebble has received more money than it had asked for.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • AT&T Begins Capping Broadband Users
    Karl Bode, reporting for DSLReports (edited for clarity): Just a reminder to AT&T customers: the company's usage caps on U-Verse broadband connections is now in effect. When AT&T originally announced broadband caps on fixed-line connections back in 2011, it capped DSL customers at 150 GB per month and U-Verse customers at 250 GB per month. But while the DSL customer cap was enforced (by and large because AT&T wants these users to migrate to wireless anyway), AT&T didn't enforce caps for its U-Verse customers. Until now, anyway. Back in March AT&T announced it would begin enforcing usage caps on all connections starting May 23. As of today, U-Verse customers face different caps depending on their speed tier. AT&T says customers on U-Verse tiers with speeds between 768 Kbps and 6 Mbps will now face a 300 GB cap; customers on U-Verse tiers of speeds between 12 Mbps and 75Mbps will see a 600 GB cap, and customers on speeds between 100 Mbps and 1 Gbps will see a cap of 1 terabyte. Users who exceed these caps in any given month will automatically have to pay for 50 GB of additional data for $10 each.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Apple, Microsoft and Google Hold 23% Of All US Corporate Cash Outside the Finance Sector
    An anonymous reader writes: Apple, Microsoft, and Google are the top three cash-rich U.S. companies across all sectors of business, not including banks and other financial institutions -- holding a combined $391 billion in cash as of the end of 2015, or more than 23 percent of the entire $1.68 trillion held by the nation's non-financial corporations. Apple leads the pack with $215.7 billion in cash, followed by Microsoft at $102.6 billion, and Google at $73.1 billion. The numbers are documented in a new report from Moody's Investors Service that shows an unprecedented concentration of cash in the tech sector. For the first time, the top five companies on the Moody's cash ranking are tech companies, with Cisco and Oracle following Apple, Microsoft, and Google. Technology companies overall held $777 billion in cash, or 46 percent of the total cash across all non-financial industries.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Apple To Launch Thinner, Lighter MacBook Pro Models With OLED Touch Bar, Touch ID In Fall
    Apple plans to refresh its MacBook Pro line later this year. The makeover will see both 13-inch and 15-inch MacBook Pro models replace their function keys atop laptop keyboards with an OLED touch bar, according to a report. Both the models will also have Touch ID fingerprint sensor, and will support Thunderbolt 3 USB-C port, multiple outlets are reporting citing ever-so-reliable KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo. The refreshed MacBook Pro model will be thinner and lighter as well. There's no word on if -- and when -- the MacBook Air lineup will receive a refresh.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Scientists Discover Why Your Dirty Laundry Stinks
    HughPickens.com writes: Discovery News reports that dirty laundry smells bad because of certain chemicals called volatile organic compounds, which can't always be washed out on an eco-friendly 20C cycle. Researchers identified six volatile organic compounds (VOCs) on dirty t-shirts and socks. "The need to conserve the environment by reducing the wash temperature and the use of biodegradable washing products have grown in importance in the new millennium, making this type of research more high profile," says Professor John Dean. The researchers gave 6 men and two women a new pair of socks. They asked the volunteers to wash their feet with tap water and dry them before wearing the socks for at least 10 hours in a specified type of shoe. They then put each sock into a separate sample bag and stored them in the dark overnight. The researchers graded each sock and t-shirt on a scale of 0 (no malodor) to 10 (malodorous) by smelling them. To determine the chemicals present, samples were taken from each one. Items were then washed on a cold cycle using unscented detergent, and resampled before they were dried, at which point researchers took one final series of specimens. Following a method called static headspace-multi-capillary column-gas chromatography-ion mobility spectrometry (SHS-MCC-GC-IMS), six main VOCs were identified as the main culprits behind smelly clothing. Each one left its own scented signature. Butyric acid, for example, produced a rancid butter-like odor, while 2-heptanone created a banana-like fruity smell. "The work is fascinating as it links an everyday event -- the washing of clothes -- with cutting-edge research," says Dean. "In this particular research project we applied a new and innovative analytical technique for the detection of volatile compounds found in laundry items. We hope this provides a way of analyzing the effectiveness of different washing techniques."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Burning All Fossil Fuels Would Scorch Earth, Says Study
    mspohr quotes a report from Phys.Org: A new study published in the Journal Nature Climate Change shows our precarious climate condition: "Using up all known fossil fuel reserves would render Earth even more unlivable than scientists had previously projected, researchers said on Monday. Average temperatures would climb by up to 9.5 degrees Celsius (17 degrees Fahrenheit) -- five times the cap on global warming set at climate talks in Paris in December, they reported. In the Arctic region -- already heating at more than double the global average -- the thermometer would rise an unimaginable 15 C to 20 C." This would make most of Earth uninhabitable to humans (although the dinosaurs seemed to do fine with it 65 million years ago). The report also stated that if fossil fuel trends go unchanged, ten times the 540 billion tons of carbon emitted since the start of industrialization would be reached near the end of the 22nd century. For comparison, "older models had projected that depleting fossil fuel reserves entirely would heat the planet by 4.3 C to 8.4 C. The new study revises this to between 6.4 C and 9.5 C," writes Phys.Org.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Facebook Is Tweaking Trending Topics To Counter Charges of Bias
    An anonymous reader writes: Facebook has said once again in an open letter to Sen. John Thune, chairman of the Senate Commerce Committee, that its Trending Topics section is free of any political bias or manipulation. But in response to Gizmodo's report that Facebook employees were suppressing conservative news stories, Facebook is revamping how editors find trending stories. "We could not fully exclude the possibility of isolated improper actions or unintentional bias in the implementation of our guidelines or policies," Facebook general Counsel Colin Stretch wrote. Of course, Facebook is going to train the human editors who work on their trending section; they're also going to abandon several automated tools it used to find and categorize trending news in the past. Recode provides some examples, writing, "[Facebook] will no longer use its "1K list," a group of 1,000 websites it used to help verify headlines." Facebook will also get rid of several top publications, including the New York Times and CNN.
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Hacker Phineas Fisher is Trying To Start a 'Hack Back' Political Movement
    An anonymous reader writes: The hacker who breached Hacking Team and FinFisher is trying to get more people to "hack back" and fight "the system." For some, thanks to his targeted attacks and sophisticated political views, Phineas Fisher is quickly becoming the most influential hacktivist of the last few years. In response to his most recent hack where he released a 39-minute how-to video showing how to strip data from targeted websites, specifically a website of the Catalan police union, Phineas Fisher told Motherboard, "Everything doesn't have to be big. I wanted to strike a small blow at the system, teach a bit of hacking with the video, and inspire people to take action." Biella Coleman, professor at McGill University in Montreal, believes Phineas Fisher has a good chance of inspiring a new generation of hacktivists and "setting the stage for other hackers to follow in his footsteps." She says he has been better at choosing targets and justifying his actions with more rounded and sophisticated political and ethical views than Anonymous and LulzSec-inspired hackers. Phineas Fisher told Motherboard, "I don't want to be the lone hacker fighting the system. I want to inspire others to take similar action, and try to provide the information so they can learn how."
             

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.




  • Twitter expands beyond 140 characters
    Photos and @username references won't be part of sending limit
    Twitter has announced another tweak to its text-message system that will give users greater space to send messages alongside pictures.…







  • UK distributor Steljes goes titsup
    Specialist audio visual firm calls administrator as cash flow dries
    Specialist audio visual distributor Steljes Ltd has called in the administrators after liquidity dried up in what was its 29th year of commercial life.…







  • UK.gov preparing to lob up to £4 BEEELLION at commodity tech
    Mega framework contract notice out ... also calls for open source
    The government’s official procurement arm, Crown Commercial Services, has coughed the contract notice for a multi-year mega framework for commodity tech valued between £2bn and £4bn.…







  • Lost containers tell no tales. Time to worry
    Keeping a grip on Docker
    Containers are becoming the de facto way of spinning up new services and applications. Many are running on cloud servers which themselves are virtual machines running on bare metal, well... somewhere in the world.…



  • Committees: Wait! Don't strap on the Privacy Shield yet
    Two working parties, ministers galore... but data transfer law remains in limbo
    The revelations by rogue NSA sysadmin Edward Snowden in 2013 caused indignant EU politicians to open a dialogue with the US government to update the data transfer regime to safeguard personal data. The Privacy Shield is the culmination of those discussions.…


  • 90 days of Android sales almost beat 9 months' worth for all flavours of Win 10
    WinPho has 0.7% market share
    Microsoft has trumpeted the fact that 300 million devices now run Windows 10, but the scale of its failure to extend its operating system dominance into mobile can be seen in the fact that of the 349 million smartphones sold in 2016's first quarter, 293.7m ran Android. And just 2.4m ran Windows Phone.…


  • Pointless features add to browser bloat and insecurity
    83 per cent of browser features are used by under one per cent of top websites
    It might be time for the warlocks of the Web and brewers of JavaScript to revisit their ever-burgeoning developer wish-lists and sweep away the rubbish.…



  • ENISA / Europol almost argue against crypto backdoors
    Malware and keyloggers are better, we think they're saying
    While the FBI, in the person of James Comey, continues its campaign to persuade the tech sector that mathematics isn't that big a thing and therefore backdoors are feasible, The European Union Agency for Network and Information Security (ENISA) and Europol have tip-toed around the issue, issuing a joint statement that both opposes and supports breaking encryption.…



  • Google security man reveals Allo will encrypt chats - sometimes.
    Choose your own adventure: Features and spies, or boring freedom.
    Security industry types and leaker Edward Snowden have rubbished new Google instant messenger app Allo after its lead product engineer revealed it would not run end-to-end encryption by default.…


  • Troll seeks toll because iPhones work
    Make a phone call, breach a patent
    Apple, your iPhones are making phone calls so we're suing you: that's the substance of the latest round of patent-trolling attempt against Cupertino.…


  • Want a better password? Pretend you eat kale. We won't tell anyone
    Everybody loves somebody sometime, so 'iloveyou' is easier to guess than 'ilovekale'
    People have a very poor grasp of what makes one password stronger than another, according to research conducted at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) and published by the Association of Computing Machinery.…


  • Swiss CERT publishes reveals details of defence contractor hack
    Crims watched Active Directory closely, then sprung their attack with off-the-shelf malware
    Swiss defence contractor RUAG and the country's GovCERT have revealed the details of a 2014 network breach in which attackers got access to a stunning 23 GB of data.…





  • Guccifer fesses up to Clinton hacks
    Romanian hacker to plead guilty
    The US Virginia Eastern District Court has posted a notice for a change of plea hearing set for Wednesday in the case of Marcel Lehel Lazar. Two additional documents were also filed with the court under seal.…


  • Ego and CEO are 66 per cent the same
    Silicon Valley episode five: Back to form
    RECAP While Game of Thrones obsessives reveled in that series' fifth episode The Door (hold the door; poor guy), the true nerds were instead staring at a chair.…


  • Safety, pah! Digital Dukes of Hazzard have robot cars powersliding
    Georgia team kick up some dirt
    Video Last month, Google, Ford and Uber started a lobbying group called the Self-Driving Coalition for Safer Streets to promote autonomous vehicles on safety grounds, but boffins in Georgia are having far more fun with their hardware.…


  • US Telecom beats up FCC over investment
    There's your version of competition and ours. We make more money with ours
    Analysis Telco lobbying group US Telecom has fired another broadside at their erstwhile friendly regulator, the Federal Communication Commission (FCC), saying the billions telcos make each month isn't enough.…









  • Cock fight? Not half. Microsoft beats down Apple in Q1
    Biz tab sales stakes - the winner and the iPad Pro
    Microsoft won bragging rights over Apple in Britain’s biz slab sales stakes following the first full quarter the two rivals went head to head with their Pro devices.…


  • Apple: Another bug fix. Er, thanks, GCHQ
    Things that make you go hmmm...
    GCHQ’s CESG (Communications-Electronics Security Group) assurance arm was behind the report of an OS X bug to Apple that the consumer electronics giant patched last week.…


  • Who cares about IT resource planning capabilities?
    How well do your tools, skills and processes stack up?
    Study More businesses than ever depend on IT systems to keep things rolling, deliver services to customers and keep the cash flowing in. But the desire to add ever faster responsiveness to business needs is placing a strain on IT – legacy internal platforms, systems running virtual machines, never mind "cloud" based solutions and everything else that's in today’s IT kitbag.…



Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM