Recent Changes - Search:

Linux is free.
Life is good.

Linux Training
10am on Meeting Days!

1825 Monetary Lane Suite #104 Carrollton, TX

Do a presentation at NTLUG.

What is the Linux Installation Project?

Real companies using Linux!

Not just for business anymore.

Providing ready to run platforms on Linux

Show Descriptions... (Show All) (Single Column)

  • Red Hat: 2016:2093-01: bind: Important Advisory An update for bind is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 and Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact [More...]

  • Red Hat: 2016:2094-01: bind97: Important Advisory An update for bind97 is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact of Important. A Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS) base score, [More...]

  • Red Hat: 2016:2088-01: java-1.8.0-oracle: Critical Advisory An update for java-1.8.0-oracle is now available for Oracle Java for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and Oracle Java for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having a security impact [More...]

  • Using Rowhammer bitflips to root Android phones is now a thing
    Previously, some experts believed Rowhammer attacks that altered specific pieces of security-sensitive data weren't reliable enough to pose a viable threat because exploits depended on chance hardware faults or advanced memory-management features that could be easily adapted to repel the attacks. Now, an international team of academic researchers is challenging those assumptions by demonstrating a Rowhammer exploit that alters crucial bits of data in a way that completely roots name brand Android devices from LG, Motorola, Samsung, OnePlus, and possibly other manufacturers. An app containing the researchers' rooting exploit requires no user permissions and doesn't rely on any vulnerability in Android to work.

  • How to install NitroShare on Ubuntu Linux for cross-platform file sharing
    NitroShare is a fantastic tool that allows you to easily share files across a local network. Created to be simple, fast, cross-platform, and open, NitroShare makes the sharing of files between systems and platforms incredibly easy...all without having to bother with Samba or Windows shares.

  • The basics of open source quality assurance
    Open source depends on a sustainable community to develop code rapidly, debug code effectively, and build out new features. Because community involvement is voluntary, people's skills, levels of involvement, and time commitments can vary. Given the variable nature of these factors, along with the fact that open source often relies on a philosophy of "release early, release often," quality assurance can be become more

  • Argo Project Developing OS Technology for Exascale
    Argo, a Department of Energy project at Argonne aimed at developing the prototype for an open-source OS that will work on any type of high-performance machine made by any vendor and will allow users to mix and match modular OS components to suit their needs... They’re developing modifications to Linux that will let the OS manage power throughout a high-performance machine.

  • Top 5 Linux System Rescue CDs
    You know those times when things go wrong on your computer, and it won’t boot, or you can't’ login into your system, or there’s a rootkit messing up your booting or you just want to recover files from a drive. Those are the times having a rescue disc will do you a great deal of good in helping you out. So let’s take a look at 5 very useful Linux based Rescue CDs you can check out.

  • curl - Command Line Download Manager Examples
    curl is a tool to transfer data from a server or to server, using one of the supported protocols (DICT, FILE, FTP, FTPS, GOPHER, HTTP, HTTPS, IMAP, IMAPS, LDAP, LDAPS, POP3, POP3S, RTMP, RTSP, SCP, SFTP, SMTP, SMTPS, TELNET and TFTP).

  • Netflix on Firefox for Linux
    If you're a Firefox user and you're a little fed up with going to Google Chrome every time in order to watch Netflix on your Linux machine, the good news is since Firefox 49 landed, HTML5 DRM (through the Google Widevine CDM (Content Decryption Manager) plugin) is now supported. Services that use DRM for HTML5 media should now just work, such as Amazon Prime Video. Unfortunately, the Netflix crew haven't 'flicked a switch' yet behind the scenes for Firefox on Linux, meaning if you run Netflix in the Mozilla browser at the moment, you'll likely just come across the old Silverlight error page. But there is a workaround.

  • How OpenStack keeps its summits safe and welcoming
    The great promise of a global open source software project like OpenStack is that it can bring together the best and the brightest from all around the world to together create something far greater than any one person, company, or nation could do on its own.

  • IBM Power Systems solution for EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server
    This article describes the general installation and tuning of EnterpriseDB Postgres Advanced Server database on IBM Power Systems servers running Linux. IBM Power servers offer significant advantages compared to similar configurations of Intel Xeon processor-based systems (Broadwell).

  • Renesas spins 3rd Gen R-Car starter kits, adds new M3 SoC
    Renesas has launched two Linux-ready R-Car starter kits optimized for AGL and GENIVI: an R-Car H3 based “Premier” and a “Pro” with a lower-end M3 SoC. Later this month, Renesas will begin selling two third-generation starter kits for its 64-bit ARM-based R-Car automotive SoCs. The kits are designed for ADAS, infotainment, reconfigurable digital clusters, and […]

  • 5 basic cURL command examples
    cURL is very useful command line tool to transfer data from or to a server. cURL supports various protocols like FILE, HTTP, HTTPS, IMAP, IMAPS, LDAP, DICT, LDAPS, TELNET, FTP, FTPS, GOPHER, RTMP, RTSP, SCP, SFTP, POP3, POP3S, SMB, SMBS, SMTP, SMTPS, and TFTP.

  • Five 3D printing projects for Halloween
    With Halloween fast approaching I figured it was time to add some 3D printed decorations to the office. Below are some of my pictures for fun Halloween-themed prints. I tried to pick some models that demonstrate varied printing more

  • Basic Guide To Encrypting Linux Partitions With LUKS
    There are plenty of reasons why people would need to encrypt a partition. Whether they're rooted it privacy, security, or confidentiality, setting up a basic encrypted partition on a Linux system is fairly easy. This is especially true when using LUKS, since its functionality is built directly into the kernel.

  • Hunting gremlin characters
    When cleaning UTF-8 text files I sometimes come across invisible characters that I call 'gremlins'.These aren't the usual non-printing characters, like whitespace and (horizontal) tab, which are non-printing characters I expect to find in the plain text files I work with. Gremlins are weird things like 'vertical tab', 'device control 2' and 'soft hyphen'. I don't know how they got into the files, but I want to get rid of them.

Error: It's not possible to reach RSS file ...

  • The Modern Way To Frame Artwork And Photos
    Framing that poster, print or photo used to require multiple trips to the mall or custom frame shop. Now, you can customize a museum-quality frame online and have it shipped to your door. See how Level uses technology to make your walls look amazing.

  • Exposing High-End Poker Cheating Devices
    In 2015, I stumbled upon a post in an underground forum, discussing how someone was ripped off at a poker table by a very advanced poker cheating device. Intrigued, I decided to follow the trail of this fabled device to see if people were indeed cheating at poker using devices that would fit naturally into a James Bond movie.

  • The Malibu Juice Magnate
    Today Khalil Rafati — owner of LA's SunLife Organics — is 46. But he shouldn’t be. In fact, he should be dead.

  • America's Strip Clubs Are Going Corporate
    Since the 1990s, corporate-chain strip clubs have taken over the exotic dance industry, transforming something erotic, exciting, and diverse into just another homogenized product.

  • Playing Real Rock On 'Rock Band' Instruments
    Technically you shouldn't be able to play "The Boxer" by the Chemical Brothers in "Rock Band," since it's not a part of the game. But with a little MIDI magic, anything is possible.

  • The First Fentanyl Addict
    What the general public is oblivious to — but the medical community knows — is how fentanyl addiction took its roots in anesthesiology before it made its way into the mainstream.

  • Theo Epstein Is The Mastermind Behind The Cubs' Season
    Theo Epstein walks to and from Wrigley, eats lunch in the empty bleachers and wants Chicago to see the ivy turn red in October. The Cubs president may be nearing middle age, but his love of the game is shining through more than ever.

  • What Makes A New York City Kid?
    "About a dozen kids agreed to document their daily lives by making videos on their ubiquitous smartphones. Others tolerated us while we shadowed them and asked annoying questions. Here’s what they gave us."

  • The Weird Economics Of Ikea
    In many cases, Ikea’s famously affordable pieces get dramatically cheaper year after year. In others, prices creep up. In some cases, products disappear entirely.

  • You Should Separate Your Day Into 100 Ten-Minute Blocks
    Most people sleep about seven or eight hours a night. That leaves 16 or 17 hours awake each day. Or about 1,000 minutes. Let’s think about those 1,000 minutes as 100 10-minute blocks. That’s what you wake up with every day.

  • An AI Audio Tool For People Who Can’t Focus
    On deadline and can’t focus? Having trouble falling asleep? Try Choose if you’re working, going to sleep or trying to relax, and then get an original composition designed to help you do exactly what it is you're trying to do.

  • The Creepiest Pictures On The Internet
    An outstretched foot with lit cigarettes tucked between each toe was “cursed image 5927.” A man sitting on a pink couch with two enormous poodles, all three of them wearing birthday hats, was “cursed image 67.”

  • The Case Against 'Black Mirror'
    "Aha!" "Black Mirror" is constantly saying. "I got you! Humanity is actually *much* worse than you thought!" And really, either you enjoy that experience, or you don’t.

  • A Visit to the CIA's 'Secret' Abstract Art Collection
    The CIA’s abstract art collection isn’t quite as "secret" as a series of articles have made it seem — but it’s more politically significant than it appears, and there are still unanswered questions. Here, photographs of the collection are accessible to the public for the first time.

  • Sign Up For Digg On Facebook Messenger
    With Digg on Facebook Messenger, you’ll get the top news and the most interesting stories of the day delivered directly to you. And if that’s not enough, just ask about any topic you want, and Digg will deliver.

  • Iceland Is Drilling A 3-Mile Hole To Tap Magma Power
    Geothermal heat pumps use hot rocks deep in the ground as a heat source to generate electricity. But if you could build a heat pump that taps liquid hot rocks, or magma, then you might really be in business.

  • How To Build A Nanoscale Computer
    The latest chips from Intel have silicon transistors with features as small as 14 nanometers. Theoretically you can have a feature as small as a single atom, but before you reach that point — at about 7 nanometers, things get weird. But what if we ditch silicon, and build computers using transistors made of carbon nanotubes?

  • Did I Kill Anyone In Iraq?
    I can’t stop thinking about whether any of my bullets ever took out a civilian. In the murky world of modern warfare, I’m far from the only one.

  • A New Attack Allows Intercepting Or Blocking Of Every LTE Phone Call And Text
    All LTE networks and devices are vulnerable to a new attack demonstrated at the Ruxon security conference in Melbourne. mask.of.sanity shared this article from The Register: It exploits LTE fall-back mechanisms designed to ensure continuity of phone services in the event of emergency situations that trigger base station overloads... The attacks work through a series of messages sent between malicious base stations spun up by attackers and targeted phones. It results in attackers gaining a man-in-the-middle position from where they can listen to calls or read SMS, or force phones back to 2G GSM networks where only voice and basic data services are available...   [Researcher Wanqiao] Zhang says the attacks are possible because LTE networks allow users to be handed over to underused base stations in the event of natural disasters to ensure connectivity. "You can create a denial of service attack against cellphones by forcing phones into fake networks with no services," Zhang told the conference. "You can make malicious calls and SMS and...eavesdrop on all voice and data traffic."

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • Fedora 25 Beta Linux Distro Now Available For Raspberry Pi
    Slashdot reader BrianFagioli writes:   Fedora 25 Beta Workstation is now available for both the Raspberry Pi 2 and Raspberry Pi 3. In addition to the Workstation image, Fedora 25 Beta Server is available too. Owners of ARMv6-powered Pi models, such as the Pi Zero, are out of luck, as the operating system will not be made available for them.   Peter Robinson (from the Fedora release engineering team) writes, "The most asked question Iâ(TM)ve had for a number of years is around support of the Raspberry Pi. Itâ(TM)s also something Iâ(TM)ve been working towards for a very long time on my own time... The kernel supports all the drivers youâ(TM)d expect, like various USB WiFi dongles, etc. You can run whichever desktop you like or Docker/Kubernetes/Ceph/Gluster as a group of devices -- albeit it slowly over a single shared USB bus!"

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • US Police Consider Flying Drones Armed With Stun Guns
    Slashdot reader Presto Vivace tipped us off to news reports that U.S. police officials are considering the use of flying drones to taser their suspects. From Digital Trends:  Talks have recently taken place between police officials and Taser International, a company that makes stun guns and body cameras for use by law enforcement, the Wall Street Journal reported on Thursday. While no decision has yet been made on whether to strap stun guns to remotely controlled quadcopters, Taser spokesman Steve Tuttle said his team were discussing the idea with officials as part of broader talks about "various future concepts."   Tuttle told the Journal that such technology could be deployed in "high-risk scenarios such as terrorist barricades" to incapacitate the suspect rather than kill them outright... However, critics are likely to fear that such a plan would ultimately lead to the police loading up drones with guns and other weapons. Portland police department's Pete Simpson told the Journal that while a Taser drone could be useful in some circumstances, getting the public "to accept an unmanned vehicle that's got some sort of weapon on it might be a hurdle to overcome."   The article points out that there's already a police force in India with flying drones equipped with pepper spray.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • More NFL Players Attack Microsoft's $400M Surface Deal With The NFL
    An anonymous reader writes; "These tablets always malfunction," complained one NFL offensive lineman in January, foreshadowing a growing backlash to Microsoft's $400 million deal with the NFL to use Surface tablets. Friday the coach of the San Francisco 49ers and their controversial quarterback Colin Kaepernick both complained they've also experienced problems, with Kaepernick saying the screen freezes "every once in a while and they have to reboot it."    Friday Microsoft called their tablet "the center of the debate on the role of technology in the NFL," saying they deeply respect NFL teams "and the IT pro's who work tirelessly behind the scenes to help them succeed." It included quotes from NFL quarterbacks -- for example, "Every second counts and having Microsoft Surface technology on sidelines allows players and coaches to analyze what our opponents are trying to do in almost real time." But Yahoo Finance wrote that "The quotes read like they were written by the Microsoft public relations team," arguing that Microsoft's NFL deal "has been a disaster... The tablets failed to work during a crucial AFC Championship game last January -- again for the New England Patriots... sports media interpreted that the malfunction benefited the Broncos on the field, giving the team an unfair advantage -- the very last thing Microsoft's tablets, meant to aid coaches in their play calling, should be doing."   The NFL issued a statement calling Microsoft "an integral, strategic partner of the NFL," adding "Within our complex environment, many factors can affect the performance of a particular technology either related to or outside of our partner's solutions."

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • Who Should We Blame For Friday's DDOS Attack?
    "Wondering which IoT device types are part of the Mirai botnet causing trouble today? Brian Krebs has the list, tweeted Trend Micro's Eric Skinner Friday, sharing an early October link which identifies Panasonic, Samsung and Xerox printers, and lesser known makers of routers and cameras. An anonymous reader quotes Fortune: Part of the responsibility should also lie with lawmakers and regulators, who have failed to create a safety system to account for the Internet-of-Things era we are now living in. Finally, it's time for consumers to acknowledge they have a role in the attack too. By failing to secure the internet-connected devices, they are endangering not just themselves but the rest of the Internet as well.  If you're worried, Motherboard is pointing people to an online scanning tool from BullGuard (a U.K. anti-virus firm) which checks whether devices on your home network are listed in the Shodan search engine for unsecured IoT devices. But earlier this month, Brian Krebs pointed out the situation is exacerbated by the failure of many ISPs to implement the BCP38 security standard to filter spoofed traffic, "allowing systems on their networks to be leveraged in large-scale DDoS attacks..."

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • Photographer Glimpses Larry Page's Flying Car Hovering In California (Maybe)
    From Hollister, California -- population 40,000 -- comes a good update from the Mercury News on Larry Page's efforts to fund a flying car: Even from a few hundred yards away, the aircraft made a noise strikingly different from the roar of a typical plane. "It sounded like an electric motor running, just a high-pitched whine," said Steve Eggleston, assistant manager at an airplane-parts company with offices bordering the Hollister Municipal Airport tarmac. But it wasn't only the sound that caught the attention of Eggleston and his co-workers at DK Turbines. It was what the aircraft was doing. "What the heck's that?" saleswoman Brittany Rodriguez thought to herself. It's just hovering."   That, apparently, was a flying car, or perhaps a prototype of another sort of aircraft under development by a mysterious startup called of two reportedly funded by Google co-founder Larry Page to develop revolutionary forms of transportation... A Zee.Aero spokeswoman said the firm is "currently not discussing (its) plans publicly." However, a Zee.Aero patent issued in 2013 describes in some detail an aircraft capable of the hovering seen by people working at the airport. And the drawings showcase a vision of the future in which flying cars park in lots just like their terrestrial, less-evolved cousins.  Page has invested $100 million in Zee.Aero, which appears to have hired more than 100 aerospace engineers. But the article reports that apparently, in the small town where it's headquartered, "the first rule about Zee.Aero is you don't talk about Zee.Aero."

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • 'Picat' Programming Language Creators Surprised With A $10,000 Prize
    An anonymous reader writes: "I didn't even know they gave out prizes," said a Brooklyn College CS professor, remembering how he'd learned that a demo of the Picat programming language won a $10,000 grand prize last month at the NYC Media Lab Summit. Professor Neng-Fa Zhou created Picat with programmer Jonathan Fruhman, and along with graduate student Jie Mei they'd created a demo titled "The Picat Language and its Application to Games and AI Problems" to showcase the language's ability to solve combinatorial search problems, "including a common interface with CP, SAT, and MIP solvers." Mie tells the Brooklyn College newspaper that Picat "is a multi-paradigm programming language aimed for general-purpose applications, which means theoretically it can be used for everything in life," and Zhou says he wants to continue making the language more useful in a variety of settings. "I want this to be successful, but not only academically... When you build something, you want people to use it. And this language has become a sensation in our community; other people have started using it."

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • Researchers Predict Next-Gen Batteries Will Last 10 Times Longer
    Lithium-metal electrodes could increase the storage capacity of batteries 10-fold, predict researchers at the University of Michigan, allowing electric cars to drive from New York to Denver without recharging. Using a $100 piece of technology, the team is now peeking inside charging batteries to study the formation of "dendrites," which consume liquid electrolytes and reduce capacity. Slashdot reader Eloking quotes New Atlas:  Battery cells are normally tested through cycles of charge and discharge, testing the capacity and flow potential of the cells before being dissected. Dasgupta and his team...added a window to a lithium cell so that they could film the dendrites forming and deforming during charge and discharge cycles.   In a video interview they're reporting that dendrites can actually help a battery if they form a small, even "carpet" inside of the battery which "can keep more lithium in play." According to the article, "The future of lithium-ion batteries is limited, says University of Michigan researcher Neil Dasgupta, because the chemistry cannot be pushed much further than it already has. Next-generation lithium cells will likely use lithium air and lithium sulfur chemistries."

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • AT&T Buys Time Warner For $85B. Is The Mass Media Consolidating?
    Though regulators may not agree, "Time Warner and AT&T reps claim this is necessary just to compete," warns Mr D from 63. Reuters reports: The tie-up of AT&T Inc and Time Warner Inc, bringing together one of the country's largest wireless and pay TV providers and cable networks like HBO, CNN and TBS, could kick off a new round of industry consolidation amid massive changes in how people watch TV... Media content companies are having an increasingly difficult time as standalone entities, creating an opportunity for telecom, satellite and cable providers to make acquisitions, analysts say. Media firms face pressure to access distribution as more younger viewers cut their cable cords and watch their favorite shows on mobile devices. Distribution companies, meanwhile, see acquiring content as a way to diversify revenue.   The deal reflects "big changes in consumption of video particularly among millennials," according to one former FCC commissioner, and the article also reports that the deal "will face serious opposition." Massachusetts Democrat Edward Markey warned "we need more competition, not more consolidation... Less competition has historically resulted in fewer choices and higher prices for consumers..." And in a Saturday speech, Donald Trump called it " an example of the power structure I'm fighting...too much concentration of power in the hands of too few."

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • "Splat" of Schiaparelli Mars Lander Likely Found
    Long-time Slashdot reader Tablizer quotes Space Flight Now:   Views from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter released Friday show the crash site where Europe's experimental Schiaparelli lander fell to the red planet's surface from a height of several miles, leaving a distinct dark patch on the Martian landscape...The image from MRO's context camera shows two new features attributed to the Schiaparelli spacecraft, including a large dark scar spanning an estimated 50 feet (15 meters) by 130 feet (40 meters). Schiaparelli's ground team believes it is from the high-speed impact of the lander's main body... A little more than a half-mile (1 kilometer) to the south, a bright spot appears in the image, likely the 39-foot-diameter (12-meter) supersonic parachute and part of Schiaparelli's heat shield, which released from the lander just before ESA lost contact."

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • A British Supercomputer Can Predict Winter Weather a Year In Advance
    The national weather service of the U.K. claims it can now predict the weather up to a year in advance.  An anonymous reader quotes The Stack: The development has been made possible thanks to supercomputer technology granted by the UK Government in 2014. The £97 million high-performance computing facility has allowed researchers to increase the resolution of climate models and to test the retrospective skill of forecasts over a 35-year period starting from 1980... The forecasters claim that new supercomputer-powered techniques have helped them develop a system to accurately predict North Atlantic Oscillation -- the climatic phenomenon which heavily impacts winters in the U.K.   The researchers apparently tested their supercomputer on 36 years worth of data, and reported proudly that they could predict winter weather a year in advance -- with 62% accuracy.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • Amazon May Handle 30% Of All US Retail Sales
    An anonymous reader quotes USA Today: Amazon's yearly sales account for about 15% of total U.S. consumer online sales, according to the company's statements and the Department of Commerce. But the Seattle e-commerce company may actually be handling double that amount -- 20% to 30% of all U.S. retail goods sold online -- thanks to the volume of sales it transacts for third parties on its website and app. Only a portion of those sales add to its revenue.   "The punchline is that Amazon's twice as big as people give them credit for, because there's this iceberg under the surface, but you only see the tip," said Scot Wingo, executive chairman of Channel Advisor, an e-commerce software company that works with thousands of online sellers. When third-party sales are taken into account, Amazon's share of what U.S. shoppers spend online could be as high as $125 billion yearly...   Amazon's share will grow even larger when they can offer two-hour deliveries, warns one analyst, while another puts it more succinctly. "Amazon's just going to slowly grab more and more of your wallet."

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • VeraCrypt Security Audit Reveals Many Flaws, Some Already Patched
    Orome1 quotes Help Net Security: VeraCrypt, the free, open source disk encryption software based on TrueCrypt, has been audited by experts from cybersecurity company Quarkslab. The researchers found 8 critical, 3 medium, and 15 low-severity vulnerabilities, and some of them have already been addressed in version 1.19 of the software, which was released on the same day as the audit report [which has mitigations for the still-unpatched vulnerabilities].   Anyone want to share their experiences with VeraCrypt? Two Quarkslab engineers spent more than a month on the audit, which was funded (and requested) by the non-profit Open Source Technology Improvement Fund "to evaluate the security of the features brought by VeraCrypt since the publication of the audit results on TrueCrypt 7.1a conducted by the Open Crypto Audit Project." Their report concludes that VeraCrypt's security "is improving which is a good thing for people who want to use a disk encryption software," adding that its main developer "was very positive along the audit, answering all questions, raising issues, discussing findings constructively..."

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • American 'Vigilante Hacker' Defaces Russian Ministry's Website
    An anonymous Slashdot reader quotes CNN Money: An American vigilante hacker -- who calls himself "The Jester" -- has defaced the website of the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs in retaliation for attacks on American targets... "Comrades! We interrupt regular scheduled Russian Foreign Affairs Website programming to bring you the following important message," he wrote. "Knock it off. You may be able to push around nations around you, but this is America. Nobody is impressed."   In early 2015, CNN Money profiled The Jester as "the vigilante who hacks jihadists," noting he's a former U.S. soldier who now "single-handedly taken down dozens of websites that, he deems, support jihadist propaganda and recruitment efforts. He stopped counting at 179." That article argues that "the fact that he hasn't yet been hunted down and arrested says a lot about federal prosecutors and the FBI. Several cybersecurity experts see it as tacit approval."   "In an exclusive interview with CNNMoney this weekend, Jester said he chose to attack Russia out of frustration for the massive DNS cyberattack that knocked out a portion of the internet in the United States on Friday... 'I'm not gonna sit around watching these f----rs laughing at us.'"

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • Dyn Executive Responds To Friday's DDOS Attack
    "It is said that eternal vigilance is the price of liberty...We must continue to work together to make the internet a more resilient place to work, play and communicate," wrote Dyn's Chief Strategy Officer in a Saturday blog post. An anonymous reader reports:  Dyn CSO Kyle York says they're still investigating Friday's attack, "conducting a thorough root cause and forensic analysis" while "carefully monitoring" for any additional attacks. In a section titled "What We Know," he describes "a sophisticated attack across multiple attack vectors and internet source of the traffic for the attacks were devices infected by the Mirai botnet. We observed 10s of millions of discrete IP addresses associated with the Mirai botnet that were part of the attack." But he warns that "we are unlikely to share all details of the attack and our mitigation efforts to preserve future defenses."   He posted a timeline of the attacks (7:00 EST and 12:00 EST), adding "While there was a third attack attempted, we were able to successfully mitigate it without customer impact... We practice and prepare for scenarios like this on a regular basis, and we run constantly evolving playbooks and work with mitigation partners to address scenarios like these." He predicts Friday's attack will be seen as "historic," and acknowledges his staff's efforts to fight the attack as well as the support received from "the technology community, from the operations teams of the world's top internet companies, to law enforcement and the standards community, to our competition and vendors... On behalf of Dyn, I'd like to extend our sincere thanks and appreciation to the entire internet infrastructure community for their ongoing show of support."  Online businesses may have lost up to $110 million in sales and revenue, according to the CEO of Dynatrace, who tells CNN more than half of the 150 websites they monitor were affected.

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.

  • Brute force cred crunchers gifted Username Anarchy
    dpauli, darren.pauli, darrenp, pauli.darren, paulid
    Ruxcon Melbourne security bod Andrew Horton has created a tool to automate the generation of usernames in a bid to round-out brute force account attacks.…

  • DARPA hands space junk spotting scope to US Air Force
    Space Surveillance Telescope can spot specks of shiny 36,000km away
    The Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Space Surveillance Telescope (SST) is on track for its transfer to a site in Australia later this year.…

  • DNS devastation: Top websites whacked offline as Dyn dies again
    Twitter, Amazon, AirBnB, Github and many others hit in DDoS attack on infrastructure
    An extraordinary, focused attack on DNS provider Dyn continues to disrupt internet services for hundreds of companies, including online giants Twitter, Amazon, AirBnB, Spotify and others.…

  • EMC moves into Dell house: Where'd I put the spoons?
    Check the Org chart, will you
    Comment We've learnt how the EMC organisation has been fitted into its new Dell house, at least at a top exec and product level, and here is an org chart set to show what we believe we know.…

  • Hewlett Packard Enterprise gives UK boss control of Ireland
    No, not the whole country, just the whole country operation
    After three decades at or near the top of HPE’s Irish ops - latterly the standalone Enterprise organisation - Martin Murphy is to leave the business by the end of February, El Reg can confirm.…

  • Today is the 211th anniversary of the Battle of Trafalgar
    Toast the Immortal Memory of Admiral Lord Nelson, shipmates
    Today marks the 211th anniversary of the Battle of Trafalgar, in which Admiral Horatio Nelson gave the combined naval might of France and Spain a bloody good kicking.…

  • Computacenter Q3 numbers lifted by weak British Pound
    'Hurrah for the Euro and our services biz in Germany' cheers reseller titan
    The weak British pound worked in Computacenter’s favour during its calendar Q3, as the conversion of Euros generated by ops in mainland Europe helped to lift group revenues and offset “softness” in the UK.…

  • Hapless Network Rail contractors KO broadband in Uxbridge
    30 cables cut and countless masts out of action
    Hapless Network Rail contractors drove a pile through 30 cable ducts, cutting phone, broadband services and many cell towers in the Uxbridge, Middlesex - potentially knocking services out until next week.…

  • Sky’s CEO drops MVNO bombshell at results conference
    Firm's sure to use its sports lure to bring in the punters
    At the announcement of its results this week, Sky said that it was planning MVNO services based on the O2 network, which is run in the UK by Telefonica. Faultline has been forecasting a move by Sky into cellular for the past four years and is surprised that it has taken this long for the move to emerge.…

  • Puppet shows its hand: All your software is belong to us
    In the future code is going to be managed and deployed by other code
    Special report In an episode of Seinfeld from 1996, George is shocked when he discovers his former boss, Mr Wilhelm, has joined a cult, the Sunshine Carpet Cleaners.…

  • Slack whacks global account hijack holes
    For a while there your Slack account could be hijacked with just a username
    Hipster collaboration platform Slack has shuttered an access control bypass that allowed users to hijack any account.…

  • Spam scum ping global blacklists to wreck rep
    Email pests seek clean machines for better hit rates.
    Malware authors are consulting IP blacklists designed to help fight spam in a bid to avoid detection and increase inbox hit rates.…

  • IBM throws ISP under a bus for Australia's #Censusfail
    Big Blue claims ISP allowed DDoS. ISP says IBM rejected DDoS advice and services
    IBM has blamed a supplier for causing the failure of Australia's online census, which went offline on the very night millions of households were required to describe their disposition.…

Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM