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  • Red Hat: 2014:1658-01: java-1.6.0-sun: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated java-1.6.0-sun packages that fix several security issues are now available for Oracle Java for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5, 6, and 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Important security [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:1657-01: java-1.7.0-oracle: Critical Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated java-1.7.0-oracle packages that fix several security issues are now available for Oracle Java for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5, 6, and 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Critical security [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:1655-01: libxml2: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated libxml2 packages that fix one security issue are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Moderate security [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:1654-01: rsyslog7: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated rsyslog7 packages that fix one security issue are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Important security [More...]




  • Red Hat: 2014:1652-01: openssl: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated openssl packages that contain a backported patch to mitigate the CVE-2014-3566 issue and fix two security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7. [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:1653-01: openssl: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated openssl packages that contain a backported patch to mitigate the CVE-2014-3566 issue are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Moderate security [More...]



  • Red Hat: 2014:1648-01: flash-plugin: Critical Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An updated Adobe Flash Player package that fixes multiple security issues is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 and 6 Supplementary. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Critical security [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:1647-01: thunderbird: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: An updated thunderbird package that fixes multiple security issues is now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 and 6. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Important security [More...]


  • Stick computer runs on quad-core Atom
    Shenzhen Apec Electronics has launched a $110, Android stick computer built around a quad-core Intel Atom Z3735 SoC with 1-2GB of RAM and 16-32GB storage. The market is awash in under-$100 HDMI dongle devices that run Android on ARM Cortex processors. Now, Intel’s Atom is getting the same treatment, although at a higher price.


  • How to install Tomcat in Ubuntu 14.04
    This document describes how to install Tomcat in Ubuntu 14.04. Apache Tomcat (or simply Tomcat, formerly also Jakarta Tomcat) is an open source web server and servlet container developed by the Apache Software Foundation (ASF). Tomcat implements the Java Servlet and the JavaServer Pages (JSP) specifications from Sun Microsystems, and provides a "pure Java" HTTP web server environment for Java code to run in.



  • Microsoft Promises Docker Open Source App Virtualization on Windows
    Microsoft has announced plans to port the open source Docker containerized virtualization platform to Windows Server and the Azure cloud. Open source developers can be sure the software they're writing is a hit when even Microsoft (MSFT) wants a piece of the action. That's exactly what's happening with Docker, the containerized virtualization platform for running cloud apps, which will now be supported in Windows Server and the Azure cloud.




  • RIPS - Static Source Code Analysis For PHP Vulnerabilities
    RIPS is a tool written in PHP to find vulnerabilities using static source code analysis for PHP web applications. By tokenizing and parsing all source code files RIPS is able to transform PHP source code into a program model and to detect sensitive sinks (potentially vulnerable functions) that can be tainted by user input (influenced by a malicious user) during the program flow. Besides the structured output of found vulnerabilities RIPS also offers an integrated code audit framework for further manual analysis.


  • 5 open access journals for open source enthusiasts
    The ever rising cost of academic journals is a major burden for researchers. Academic libraries cannot always keep up with increases in subscription fees causing libraries to drop journals from their collection. This makes it harder for students and professors to quickly and easily access the information they need. Inter-library loan requests are an option but they do take time. Even if it only takes a few days to fill an inter-library loan request, that is still time wasted for a researcher that has a deadline. While there is no single, quick fix to the problem with the academic journal prices, there is a movement applying the open source way to academic research in an attempt to solve the problem—the open access movement.



  • What should they call Ubuntu 15.04?
    In this week's news, Munich is not switching back to Windows, will Gnome make a comeback and the all important question, what should they call Ubuntu 15.04?



  • Google Chromebook quietly takes aim at the enterprise
    When Google introduced Chromebook for Work recently, it very likely made the Chromebook even more attractive to frugal enterprises. While the price tag has always been a draw, having administrative control should appeal to IT and could facilitate more Chromebook use in the enterprise in the future.



  • How OpenStack powers the research at CERN
    OpenStack has been in a production environment at CERN for more than a year. One of the people that has been key to implementing the OpenStack infrastructure is Tim Bell. He is responsible for the CERN IT Operating Systems and Infrastructure group which provides a set of services to CERN users from email, web, operating systems, and the Infrastructure-as-a-Service cloud based on OpenStack.We had a chance to interview Bell in advance of the OpenStack Summit Paris 2014 where he will deliver two talks. The first session is about cloud federation while the second session is about multi-cell OpenStack.read more


  • What is a good command-line calculator on Linux
    Every modern Linux desktop distribution comes with a default GUI-based calculator app. On the other hand, if your workspace is full of terminal windows, and you would rather crunch some numbers within one of those terminals quickly, you are probably looking for a command-line calculator. In this category, GNU bc (short for "basic calculator") is […]Continue reading...The post What is a good command-line calculator on Linux appeared first on Xmodulo.Related FAQs:How to look up dictionary via command line on Linux How to speed up directory navigation in a Linux terminal How to access Linux command cheat sheets from the command line What are useful CLI tools for Linux system admins


  • What would you print with a 3D printer?
    3D printing is all the rage. 3D printing changes lives. 3D printing is fun and amazing!I saw for myself this past spring when we held our first Open Hardware Day at Opensource.com. Here, we're printing a gear.read more


  • UNIX greybeards threaten Debian fork over systemd plan
    'Veteran Unix Admins' fear desktop emphasis is betraying open sourceA group of “Veteran Unix Admins” reckons too much input from GNOME devs is dumbing down Debian, and in response, is floating the idea of a fork.…


  • A Seat at the Big Kids’ Table at Ohio LinuxFest
    Ohio LinuxFest isn’t just another excuse to travel. It’s a means for us to fulfill ourselves, and to get honest, tangible feedback for what we do and for what others are doing. It’s a place where ideas are sounded, bent, crumpled and turned until they either come out of the crucible perfect…or useless.



  • Redmond top man Satya Nadella: 'Microsoft LOVES Linux'
    "Microsoft loves Linux" is generally not something one expects to hear, but that was one of the messages that Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella delivered at a San Francisco media event touting Redmond's cloud offerings on Monday. According to Nadella, 20 per cent of Microsoft's Azure cloud is already Linux and the software giant plans to always have first-class support for Linux distributions in its public cloud offerings.


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  • Escape From Microsoft Word
    The word processor that most of the world uses every day, Microsoft Word, is a work of genius that’s almost always wrong as an instrument for writing prose.


  • Data Mining The New Black Box Of Self-Driving Cars
    As with other emerging disruptive technologies, such as drones and wearables, it is essential that issues relating to user privacy and data security are properly addressed prior to the technologies being generally deployed.



  • Why Talking About Pizza Can Land You In Trouble In Thailand
    If you are in Thailand and you suddenly crave for pizza, it is highly likely that you will be referred to The Pizza Company, the largest pizza fast food chain in the country. And when you dial the company hotline “1112”, be aware that there are some activists in Thailand who use the word pizza to refer to the notorious Article 112 of the criminal code.










  • Toward Land’s End
    Despite the tech industry's takeover of San Francisco, remnants of the old city still remain.


  • Postscript: Benjamin C. Bradlee (1921-2014)
    Younger people watching the actor Jason Robards’s portrayal of Bradlee in “All the President’s Men” can be forgiven for thinking it is a broad caricature, an exaggeration of his cement-mixer voice, his cocky ebullience, his ferocious instinct for a political story, and his astonishing support for his reporters. In fact, Robards underplayed Bradlee.


  • Inside Hollywood's Shocking Blackface Problem
    A civil rights fight that was thought to have been eradicated years ago is nevertheless taking place in the entertainment industry. So why is Hollywood still “painting down” stuntpeople?





  • How To Trap A Cat In 3 Easy Steps
    The Internet is collectively performing a study on cat behavioral psychology, and all of us (and our cats) can participate! After a few users on Reddit and Imgur noticed that their cats are attracted to circles, submissions poured in of other cat owners trying these low-tech traps on their feline friends.






  • States That Make Voting Super Simple — Or Stupidly Hard
    Voting is the most basic act of citizenship, but you wouldn't know it from the hodgepodge of conflicting, hard-to-decipher state election laws that can make casting a ballot a pleasure for some Americans and a hassle for others.



  • Life On A Deadly Himalayan Trail
    We finally crossed the Thorung La Pass after a grueling week of trekking the rugged terrains of the Annapurna Circuit. We congratulated ourselves, started descending, then stopped for a luncheon mixture of water, Nescafe and local alcohol. We took a small plane and then a large one, and only when we returned to Washington did we hear the news.Death had missed us by two days.






  • FTC Names New Chief Technologist
    The Federal Trade Commission, the nation’s top consumer protection regulator, appointed a privacy expert and former journalist as its chief technologist on Tuesday, a signal that the commission intends to maintain a close watch on online privacy and security issues.








  • There’s No Such Thing As A 'Non-Lethal' Weapon
    A weapon’s lethality is, ultimately, not up to the object itself. Arguing otherwise is an attempt to shift one of our greatest moral responsibilities onto an inanimate object that has no agency.






  • The Sea Is Dope
    Every movie set on the sea is dope. "White Squall" is dope. "The Perfect Storm" is dope. "Master and Commander" is super dope, plus your man Paul Bettany goes out and catalogues turtles.


  • Man Tells Obama 'Don't Touch My Girlfriend'
    President Obama cast his ballot in Chicago during early voting for the 2014 Midterm Elections, and he just so happened to be in same room as the most jealous man in all of Illinois.


  • Rwanda Introduces Ebola Screening — For Americans
    The notice appears to be in response to recent cases in both countries. In addition to the three people diagnosed with the deadly virus in Dallas, an additional five patients transported from West Africa have received treatment for Ebola on American soil.



  • How Text Messages Change From Dating To Marriage
    Way back in October 2008, my now husband and I went on our first date. On our one year anniversary, his gift to me was a Word doc of all of our text messages since our first date (what he likes to refer to as #thegiftofdata).To celebrate our six year anniversary, I decided to take his present to the next level. I took a look at all of our text messages from our first year of dating and compared them with our text messages from the past year as an engaged couple andthen newlyweds.



  • Nordic Prisons Are Nothing Like American Ones
    James Conway, retired Superintendent of Attica Correctional Facility in New York, visited four Nordic prisons and facilities and was stunned when he saw inmates had access to metal silverware, power tools, and various other (potentially dangerous) luxuries.





  • Number Of Eggs A Woman Has Predicts Heart Attack Risk
    The number of eggs in a woman's ovaries could tell a lot more than just how fertile she is. It may provide a window onto how fast her cells are ageing and, in particular, reflect her risk of developing heart disease.





  • Can You Uber A Burger?
    Inspired by how we pay for concerts, airline tickets and, more recently, transportation through the car-hailing service Uber, more and more apps and reservation systems have homed in on disrupting a fundamental ritual: how we book a table.



  • The Pentagon Still Has A Transgender Ban
    The end of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell let gays, lesbians, and bisexuals serve openly in the military. But transgender individuals remain excluded. A conference Monday examined that policy.








  • Staples Probing Possible Payment Card Data Breach
    Staples is investigating a possible breach of payment card data and has contacted law enforcement about the matter, making it the latest U.S. retailer to become a possible victim of a cyberattack.


  • The Continuing Quest For The Holy Hoverboard
    A lot of things can hover. There are helicopters. There are hovercraft. But for the last three decades, a generation of engineers and movie fans have been waiting for something else: a hovering skateboard like the one in “Back to the Future Part II.”



  • No Blame, No Forgiveness: On Sex Work
    The first time a man offered me money for sex it was just after dawn. We were a part of the 7 am public library crowd, shivering and waiting for the doors to open. He was eating yogurt.


  • Ask Slashdot: Aging and Orphan Open Source Projects?
    osage writes: Several colleagues and I have worked on an open source project for over 20 years under a corporate aegis. Though nothing like Apache, we have a sizable user community and the software is considered one of the de facto standards for what it does. The problem is that we have never been able to attract new, younger programmers, and members of the original set have been forced to find jobs elsewhere or are close to retirement. The corporation has no interest in supporting the software. Thus, in the near future, the project will lose its web site host and be devoid of its developers and maintainers. Our initial attempts to find someone to adopt the software haven't worked. We are looking for suggestions as to what course to pursue. We can't be the only open source project in this position.







  • First Evidence of Extrasolar Planets Discovered In 1917
    KentuckyFC writes: Earth's closest white dwarf is called van Maanen 2 and sits 14 light-years from here. It was discovered by the Dutch astronomer Adriaan van Maanen in 1917, but it was initially hard to classify. That's because its spectra contains lots of heavy elements alongside hydrogen and helium, the usual components of a white dwarf photosphere. In recent years, astronomers have discovered many white dwarfs with similar spectra and shown that the heavy elements come from asteroids raining down onto the surface of the stars. It turns out that all these white dwarfs are orbited by a large planet and an asteroid belt. As the planet orbits, it perturbs the rocky belt, causing asteroids to collide and spiral in toward their parent star. This process is so common that astronomers now use the heavy element spectra as a marker for the presence of extrasolar planets. A re-analysis of van Maanen's work shows that, in hindsight, he was the first to discover the tell-tale signature of extrasolar planets almost a century ago.







  • Internet Broadband Through High-altitude Drones
    mwagner writes: Skynet is coming. But not like in the movie: The future of communications is high-altitude solar-powered drones, flying 13 miles above the ground, running microwave wireless equipment, delivering broadband to the whole planet. The articles predicts this technology will replace satellites, fiber, and copper, and fundamentally change the broadband industry. The author predicts a timescale of roughly 20 years — the same amount of time between Arthur C. Clarke predicting geosynchronous satellites and their reality as a commercial business. "Several important technology milestones need to be reached along the way. The drones that will make up Skynet have a lot more in common with satellites than the flippy-flappy helicopter drone thingies that the popular press is fixated on right now. They're really effing BIG, for one thing. And, like satellites, they go up, and stay up, pretty much indefinitely. For that to happen, we need two things: lighter, higher-capacity wireless gear; and reliable, hyper-efficient solar tech."







  • Isaac Asimov: How Do People Get New Ideas?
    HughPickens.com writes: Arthur Obermayer, a friend of the Isaac Asimov, writes that he recently rediscovered an unpublished essay by Asimov written in 1959 while cleaning out some old files. Obermayer says it is "as broadly relevant today as when he wrote it. It describes not only the creative process and the nature of creative people but also the kind of environment that promotes creativity." Here's an excerpt from Asimov's essay, which is well worth reading in its entirety: "A person willing to fly in the face of reason, authority, and common sense must be a person of considerable self-assurance. Since he occurs only rarely, he must seem eccentric (in at least that respect) to the rest of us. A person eccentric in one respect is often eccentric in others. Probably more inhibiting than anything else is a feeling of responsibility. The great ideas of the ages have come from people who weren't paid to have great ideas, but were paid to be teachers or patent clerks or petty officials, or were not paid at all. The great ideas came as side issues."







  • Fiber Optics In Antarctica Will Monitor Ice Sheet Melting
    sciencehabit writes: Earth is rapidly being wired with fiber-optic cables — inexpensive, flexible strands of silicon dioxide that have revolutionized telecommunications. They've already crisscrossed the planet's oceans, linking every continent but one: Antarctica. Now, fiber optics has arrived at the continent, but to measure ice sheet temperatures rather than carry telecommunication signals. A team of scientists using an innovative fiber-optic cable–based technology has measured temperature changes within and below the ice over 14 months. This technology, they say, offers a powerful new tool to observe and quantify melting at the base of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet.







  • Microsoft Introduces Build Cadence Selection With Windows 10
    jones_supa writes: Microsoft has just released Windows 10 TP build 9860. Along with the new release, Microsoft is introducing an interesting cadence option for how quickly you will receive new builds. The "ring progression" goes from development, to testing, to release. By being in the slow cadence, you will get more stable builds, but they will arrive less often. By choosing the fast option, it allows you to receive the build on the same day that it is released. As a quick stats update, to date Microsoft has received over 250,000 pieces of feedback through the Windows Feedback tool, 25,381 community forum posts, and 641 suggestions in the Windows Suggestion Box.







  • Ebola Does Not Require an "Ebola Czar," Nor Calling Up the National Guard
    Lasrick writes: David Ropeik explores risk-perception psychology and Ebola in the U.S. "[O]fficials are up against the inherently emotional and instinctive nature of risk-perception psychology. Pioneering research on this subject by Paul Slovic, Baruch Fischhoff, and others, vast research on human cognition by Daniel Kahneman and colleagues, and research on the brain's fear response by neuroscientists Joseph LeDoux, Elizabeth Phelps, and others, all make abundantly clear that the perception of risk is not simply a matter of the facts, but more a matter of how those facts feel. ... People worry more about risks that are new and unfamiliar. People worry more about risks that cause greater pain and suffering. People worry more about threats against which we feel powerless, like a disease for which there is no vaccine and which has a high fatality rate if you get it. And people worry more about threats the more available they are to their consciousness—that is, the more aware people are of them."







  • Google Leads $542m Funding Round For Augmented Reality Wearables Company
    An anonymous reader writes: After rumors broke last week, Magic Leap has officially closed the deal on a $542 million Series B investment led by Google. The company has been extremely tight-lipped about what they're working on, but some digging reveals it is most likely an augmented reality wearable that uses a lightfield display. "Using our Dynamic Digitized Lightfield Signal, imagine being able to generate images indistinguishable from real objects and then being able to place those images seamlessly into the real world," the company teases. Having closed an investment round, Magic Leap is now soliciting developers to create for their platform and hiring a huge swath of positions.







  • The Future of Stamps
    New submitter Kkloe writes: Wired is running a profile of a gadget called Signet, which is trying to bring postage stamps into the age of high technology. Quoting: "At its core, it is a digital stamp and an app. If you want to send a parcel, you'd simply stamp it with a device that uses a laser to etch it with your name and a unique identifying pattern. After that, the USPS would pick up your package; from there, the app would prompt you to provide the name of the person you're trying to reach." I'm curious whether such a finely-detailed etching can even survive a journey. How far can you expect it to travel before all the handling and sorting make the mark unreadable to the sorting machines in the delivery office? Then you'd have to worry the post office would mark it as a fraudulent stamp (as someone has to pay for the shipping in some way) and either return it or throw it away.







  • The Bogus Batoid Submarine is Wooden, not Yellow (Video)
    This is a "wet" submarine. It doesn't try to keep water out. You wear SCUBA gear while pedaling it. And yes, it is powered by a person pushing pedals. That motion, through a drive train, makes manta-style wings flap. This explains the name, since rays are Batoids, and this sub is a fake Batoid, not a real one. It's a beautiful piece of work, and Martin Plazyk is obviously proud to show it off. He and his father, Bruce, operate as Faux Fish Technologies. Follow that link and you'll see many photos, along with a nice selection of videos showing their creations not just in static above-water displays, but in their natural (underwater) element. Meanwhile, here on Slashdot, Martin tells how Faux Fish subs are made. (Alternate Video Link)







  • Samsung Acknowledges and Fixes Bug On 840 EVO SSDs
    Lucas123 writes: Samsung has issued a firmware fix for a bug on its popular 840 EVO triple-level cell SSD. The bug apparently slows read performance tremendously for any data more than a month old that has not been moved around on the NAND. Samsung said in a statement that the read problems occurred on its 2.5-in 840 EVO SSDs and 840 EVO mSATA drives because of an error in the flash management software algorithm. Some users on technical blog sites, such as Overclock.net, say the problem extends beyond the EVO line. They also questioned whether the firmware upgrade was a true fix or if it just covers up the bug by moving data around the SSD.







  • NPR: '80s Ads Are Responsible For the Lack of Women Coders
    gollum123 writes: Back in the day, computer science was as legitimate a career path for women as medicine, law, or science. But in 1984, the number of women majoring in computing-related subjects began to fall, and the percentage of women is now significantly lower in CS than in those other fields. NPR's Planet Money sought to answer a simple question: Why? According to the show's experts, computers were advertised as a "boy's toy." This, combined with early '80s geek culture staples like the book Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution, as well as movies like War Games and Weird Science, conspired to instill the perception that computers were primarily for men.







  • Cell Transplant Allows Paralyzed Man To Walk
    New submitter tiberus sends word of a breakthrough medical treatment that has restored the ability to walk to a man who was paralyzed from the chest down after his spinal cord was severed in a knife attack. A research team from the UK, led by Professor Geoff Raisman, transplanted cells from the patient's nose, along with strips of nerve tissue from his ankle, to the place where the spine was severed. This allowed the fibers in the spinal cord to gradually reconnect. The treatment used olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) - specialist cells that form part of the sense of smell. ... In the first of two operations, surgeons removed one of the patient's olfactory bulbs and grew the cells in culture. Two weeks later they transplanted the OECs into the spinal cord, which had been cut through in the knife attack apart from a thin strip of scar tissue on the right. They had just a drop of material to work with - about 500,000 cells. About 100 micro-injections of OECs were made above and below the injury. Four thin strips of nerve tissue were taken from the patient's ankle and placed across an 8mm (0.3in) gap on the left side of the cord. ... Two years after the treatment, he can now walk outside the rehabilitation center using a frame.







  • Ask Slashdot: Event Sign-Up Software Options For a Non-Profit?
    New submitter don_e_b writes I have been asked by a non-profit to help them gather a team of volunteer developers, who they wish to have write an online volunteer sign-up site. This organization has a one large event per year with roughly 1400 volunteers total.I have advised them to investigate existing online volunteer offerings, and they can afford to pay for most that I've found so far. In the past two years, they have used a site written by a volunteer that has worked fine for them, but that volunteer is unavailable to maintain or enhance his site this year. They believe the existing online volunteer sign-up sites are not quite right — they feel they have very specific sign-up needs, and can not picture using anything other than their own custom software solution. I am convinced it's a mistake for this non-profit to create a software development team from a rotating pool of volunteers to write software upon which it is critically dependent. How would you convince them to abandon their plan to dive into project management and use an existing solution?







  • Google Adds USB Security Keys To 2-Factor Authentication Options
    An anonymous reader writes with this excerpt from VentureBeat: Google today announced it is beefing up its two-step verification feature with Security Key, a physical USB second factor that only works after verifying the login site is truly a Google website. The feature is available in Chrome: Instead of typing in a code, you can simply insert Security Key into your computer's USB port and tap it when prompted by Google's browser. "When you sign into your Google Account using Chrome and Security Key, you can be sure that the cryptographic signature cannot be phished," Google promises. While Security Key works with Google Accounts at no charge, you'll need to go out and buy a compatible USB device directly from a Universal 2nd Factor (U2F) participating vendor.







  • Your Online TV Watching Can Now Be Tracked Across Devices
    itwbennett (1594911) writes A partnership between TV measurement company Nielsen and analytics provider Adobe, announced today, will let broadcasters see (in aggregate and anonymized) how people interact with digital video between devices — for example if you begin watching a show on Netflix on your laptop, then switch to a Roku set-top box to finish it. The information learned will help broadcasters decide what to charge advertisers, and deliver targeted ads to viewers. Broadcasters can use the new Nielsen Digital Content Ratings, as they're called, beginning early next year. Early users include ESPN, Sony Pictures Television, Turner Broadcasting and Viacom.







  • 'Microsoft Lumia' Will Replace the Nokia Brand
    jones_supa writes The last emblems of Nokia are being removed from Microsoft products. "Microsoft Lumia" is the new brand name that takes their place. The name change follows a slow transition from Nokia.com over to Microsoft's new mobile site, and Nokia France will be the first of many countries that adopt "Microsoft Lumia" for its Facebook, Twitter, and other social media accounts. Microsoft has confirmed to The Verge that other countries will follow the rebranding steps in the coming weeks. Nokia itself continues as a reborn company focusing on mapping and network infrastructure services.







  • Safercar.gov Overwhelmed By Recall For Deadly Airbags
    darylb writes "The NHTSA's safercar.gov website appears to be suffering under the load of recent vehicle recalls, including the latest recall of some 4.7 million vehicles using airbags made by Takata. Searching recalls by VIN is non-responsive at present. Searching by year, make, and model hangs after selecting the year. What can sites serving an important public function do to ensure they stay running during periods of unexpected load?" More on the airbag recall from The New York Times and the Detroit Free Press.







  • Delivering Malicious Android Apps Hidden In Image Files
    An anonymous reader writes "Researchers have found a way to deliver a malicious app to Android users by hiding it into what seems to be an encrypted image file, which is then delivered via a legitimate, seemingly innocuous wrapper app. Fortinet malware researcher Axelle Apvrille and reverse engineer Ange Albertini created a custom tool they dubbed AngeCryption, which allows them to encrypt the payload Android application package (APK) and make it look like an image (PNG, JPG) file . They also had to create another APK that carries the "booby-trapped" image file and which can decrypt it to unveil the malicious APK file and install it. A malicious app thusly encrypted is nearly invisible to reverse engineers, and possibly even to AV solutions and Google's Android Bouncer." (Here's the original paper, from researchers Axelle Apvrille and Ange Albertini.)







  • Speed Cameras In Chicago Earn $50M Less Than Expected
    countach44 writes that (in the words of the below-linked article) "Chicagoans are costing the city tens of millions of dollars — through good behavior." The City of Chicago recently installed speed cameras near parks and schools as part of the "Children's Safety Zone Program," claiming a desire to decrease traffic-related incidents in those area. The city originally budgeted (with the help of the company providing the system) to have $90M worth of income from the cameras — of which only $40M is now expected. Furthermore, the city has not presented data on whether or not those areas have become safer.







  • Mars Orbiter Beams Back Images of Comet's Surprisingly Tiny Nucleus
    astroengine writes The High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on board NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has become the first instrument orbiting Mars to beam back images of comet Siding Spring's nucleus and coma. And by default, it has also become the first ever mission to photograph a long-period comet's pristine nucleus on its first foray into the inner solar system. Interestingly, through analysis of these first HiRISE observations, astronomers have determined that the icy nucleus at the comet's core is much smaller than originally thought. "Telescopic observers had modeled the size of the nucleus as about half a mile, or one kilometer, wide," writes a NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory news release. "However, the best HiRISE images show only two to three pixels across the brightest feature, probably the nucleus, suggesting a size less than half that estimate."







  • Facebook To DEA: Stop Using Phony Profiles To Nab Criminals
    HughPickens.com writes: CNNMoney reports that Facebook has sent a letter to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration demanding that agents stop impersonating users on the social network. "The DEA's deceptive actions... threaten the integrity of our community," Facebook chief security officer Joe Sullivan wrote to DEA head Michele Leonhart. "Using Facebook to impersonate others abuses that trust and makes people feel less safe and secure when using our service." Facebook's letter comes on the heels of reports that the DEA impersonated a young woman on Facebook to communicate with suspected criminals, and the Department of Justice argued that they had the right to do so. Facebook contends that their terms and Community Standards — which the DEA agent had to acknowledge and agree to when registering for a Facebook account — expressly prohibit the creation and use of fake accounts. "Isn't this the definition of identity theft?" says privacy researcher Runa Sandvik. The DEA has declined to comment and referred all questions to the Justice Department, which has not returned CNNMoney's calls.







  • 3D-Printed Gun Earns Man Two Years In Japanese Prison
    jfruh writes: Japan has some of the strictest anti-gun laws in the world, and the authorities there aim to make sure new technologies don't open any loopholes. 28-year-old engineer Yoshitomo Imura has been sentenced to two years in jail after making guns with a 3D printer in his home in Kawasaki.


    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • 3D-Printed Gun Earns Man Two Years In Japanese Prison
    jfruh writes: Japan has some of the strictest anti-gun laws in the world, and the authorities there aim to make sure new technologies don't open any loopholes. 28-year-old engineer Yoshitomo Imura has been sentenced to two years in jail after making guns with a 3D printer in his home in Kawasaki.







  • Australian Physicists Build Reversible Tractor Beam
    An anonymous reader writes: Physicists at Australian National University have developed a tiny tractor beam that improves in several ways upon previous attempts. First, it operates on scales which, while still tiny, are higher than in earlier experiments. The beam can move particles up to 200 microns in diameter, and it can do so over a distance of 20 cm. "Unlike previous techniques, which used photon momentum to impart motion, the ANU tractor beam relies on the energy of the laser heating up the particles and the air around them (abstract). The ANU team demonstrated the effect on gold-coated hollow glass particles. The particles are trapped in the dark center of the beam. Energy from the laser hits the particle and travels across its surface, where it is absorbed creating hotspots on the surface. Air particles colliding with the hotspots heat up and shoot away from the surface, which causes the particle to recoil, in the opposite direction. To manipulate the particle, the team move the position of the hotspot by carefully controlling the polarization of the laser beam."










  • Computer misuse: Brits could face LIFE IN PRISON for serious hacking offences
    Vague wording leads to legal uncertainty, says JCHR
    British computer hackers who severely damage the national security of any country could face life in prison under a new criminal offence proposed in the Serious Crime Bill, however the plan has been attacked for lacking legal certainty by MPs and peers.…


  • Comet Siding Spring revealed as flying molehill
    Hiding from this space pimple isn't going to do humanity's reputation any good
    The first images of Comet Siding Spring, a celestial body deemed so menacing that humanity cocooned its very best robots, has turned out to be rather smaller than imagined.…


  • Pagers shout data center creds, pop star airport arrivals
    Encryption: IBM and Australian spooks have heard of it, but aren't using it
    Anyone wanting to know the time world leaders arrive in Australia for the coming G20 summit need only listen to broadcasts from Aussie airports, researcher Ed Farrell has claimed at the Ruxcon conference.…




  • VMware's new enemy no. 1 isn't Hyper-V, it's Vladimir Putin
    Healthy quarter marred by plunge in Russian sales and missed US federal deal
    You can tell a lot about how a company is going by listening to financial analysts' questions at the end of an earnings conference call. When things are good – as they were in VMware's Q1 earnings call – analysts can almost gush. If there's a hint of weakness or illogic, analysts can find all sorts of things about which to ask picky questions.…



  • NOT OK GOOGLE: Android images can conceal code
    It's been fixed, but hordes won't have applied the upgrade
    Someone's found (yet) another nasty security flaw in Android, by crafting a way to pack malicious software to look like images.…


  • PARC Alto source code released by computer history museum
    A slice of history: the GUI before the Apple
    The Computer History Museum in Mountain View has released another foundational piece of software to the world at large: some of the code that gave the world the Xerox Alto computer, which among other things helped inspire a couple of young garage developers, Steves Jobs and Wozniak.…



  • Marty McFly wannabes face disappointment with the Hendo Hoverboard
    Buzzing board (and some future apps) leave a lot to be desired
    The internet is aflutter over the Kickstarter campaign for the Hendo Hoverboard, a magnetically levitating board that the firm promises will be available on October 21, 2015 – the same day that Michael J Fox programmed into the De Lorean for the second Back to the Future film.…


  • Broadcom pitches chips at G.fast OEMs
    'Gigabit' silicon should land in equipment in 2016
    Broadcom has become the latest vendor to stake out its ground in the G.fast market, as the ITU's standardisation bods stretch their hands slowly towards the rubber stamp.…



  • San Franciscans: Lyft and UberX want to take you to the airport
    If your driver doesn't pull you out of the car and smash your phone first, that is
    Bay Area residents looking to get to San Francisco International Airport (SFO) received another option this week when Uber announced it had agreed with authorities on a plan to allow UberX and Lyft drivers to travel to and from the airport.…



  • Telstra ambit claim gets ACCC pushback
    Tell 'em they're DREAMING, son
    The stage is set for another drawn-out battle over wholesale telecommunication service pricing in Australia, with the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) indicating it's not going to rubber-stamp Telstra's request for a 7.2 per cent price hike.…


  • Preview redux: Microsoft ships new Windows 10 build with 7,000 changes
    Latest bleeding-edge bits borrow Action Center from Windows Phone
    Less than three weeks after it debuted the Windows 10 Technical Preview, Microsoft has shipped a comprehensive update to the pre-release OS that brings substantial changes, including some new features borrowed from Windows Phone.…


  • Apple, GT bury hatchet – but sapphire screen spat skinny stays secret
    GT to sell off factory to repay Cupertino loans if deal is approved
    Apple and GT Advanced Technologies, the materials company that was once slated to provide ultra-durable sapphire glass for iPhones and other Apple products, have agreed to an "amicable parting of the ways," according to sources with knowledge of GT's bankruptcy litigation.…





  • Chinese APT groups targeting Australian lawyers
    Have a bit of sympathy, people: lawyers hold YOUR data and juicy stuff about big deals
    Law firms are among Australian businesses being targeted by at least 13 Chinese advanced malware groups in a bid to steal intelligence from big business, says forensics bod and Mandiant man Mark Goudie.…




  • ARM heads: Our cores still have legs ... as shares tumble amid 'peak smartphone' fears
    Chip shipments up 19% in Q3, but revenues missed
    British chip design firm ARM Holdings painted a rosy picture of its future growth on Tuesday, but it missed analysts' revenue expectations for the third quarter of its fiscal 2014, reigniting old fears that slowing smartphone growth will hurt the firm's long-term profitability – even though it's looking just fine in the near term.…





  • Edward who? GCHQ boss dodges Snowden topic during last speech
    UK spies would rather 'walk' than do 'mass surveillance'
    Sir Iain Lobban's final speech as GCHQ director omitted any mention of that man Edward Snowden, and unlike recent speeches by FBI and law enforcement officials on both side of the Atlantic, the spy boss had no critical words for Apple and Google's plans to roll out improved encryption on smartphones and computers.…


  • Reg man has the cure for IBM storage: Just swallow 10 firms
    It'll only set you back a few billion
    Comment When you are walking on the Moon, far from home and Earth's tethering gravity then giant steps are what you take. When a product set becomes low or no-growth, then its tethering product gravity effect is weakened and you need to take giant steps to rebuild it ... which brings us to IBM.…


  • Microsoft and Dell’s cloud in a box: Instant Azure for the data centre
    A less painful way to run Microsoft’s private cloud
    Analysis Two words were missing from Microsoft’s cloudy event in San Francisco yesterday, where CEO Satya Nadella and Cloud and Enterprise VP Scott Guthrie presented an update to the company’s Azure and hybrid cloud strategy. Those two words were System Center.…




  • Reg Vulture grills Xen hypervisor daddy on latest storage upstart
    Coho Data techie gets technical on flash-disk rivals
    Interview Like other storage startups, Coho Data has had to swim upstream* against prevailing storage orthodoxy. Its CTO and co-founder, Andrew Warfield, was one of the original authors of the Xen hypervisor, and we recently took the opportunity to ask him some questions about the firm's technology, product positioning and progress.…




  • You get what you pay for: Kingston's SSDNow V310 960GB whopper
    Enterprise-worthy TBW stats ... with price tag to match
    Review Kingston’s SSD division have been a bit quiet lately but now they're back in the limelight with the V310 960GB. This is the latest model in the company’s SSDNow V300 series of drives aimed at the budget/entry level end of the market. At 960GB it’s the largest capacity Kingston SSD to date.…


  • Lords take revenge on REVENGE PORN publishers
    Jilted Johns and Jennies with busy fingers face two years inside
    The House of Lords has agreed new legislation making “revenge porn” a criminal offence in England and Wales, punishable by up to two years in prison.…




  • OnePlus One cut-price Android phone on sale to all... for 1 HOUR
    Still teasing...
    Word-of-mouth sensation the OnePlus One smartphone finally goes on general sale to the public next week – six months after the phone was launched, and after a number of not-always successful promotional gimmicks. But only in 16 territories. And you only have an hour on Monday to check out.…


  • Will EMC swallow cloudy upstart? These analysts seem to think so
    Maginatics baits hook with software-only storage
    Any move by EMC to acquire Maginatics — and the latter’s software-only cloud storage gateway — would be a “very smart buy”, according to analyst Ben Woo at technical consultancy Neuralytics, following speculation the storage giant is closing in on the startup.…







Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM