Recent Changes - Search:
NTLUG

Linux is free.
Life is good.

Linux Training
10am on Meeting Days!

1825 Monetary Lane Suite #104 Carrollton, TX

Do a presentation at NTLUG.

What is the Linux Installation Project?

Real companies using Linux!

Not just for business anymore.

Providing ready to run platforms on Linux

Show Descriptions... (Show All) (Single Column)


  • Red Hat: 2014:0888-01: qemu-kvm-rhev: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated qemu-kvm-rhev packages that fix several security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 3.0 and 4.0. The Red Hat Security Response Team has rated this update as having Moderate [More...]





  • Red Hat: 2014:0939-01: python-django-horizon: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated python-django-horizon packages that fix three security issues, multiple bugs, and add an enhancement are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 5.0 (Icehouse) for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. [More...]








  • Autonomous sub powers up with Wheezy on Haswell
    Cornell University’s “Gemini” AUV will compete in next week’s 2014 RoboSub competition. The sub runs Debian Linux on an Intel Core-based computer-on-module. The Cornell University Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (CUAUV) team’s Gemini AUV will enter next week’s 17th Annual International RoboSub competition with the help of Adlink, whose “Express-HL” COM Express style computer-on-module will power the […]


  • Wireless speakers stream audio from web and WLAN
    Denon debuted a line of Sonos-like wireless multi-room HiFi speakers that stream audio from both Internet and local sources, and run on embedded Linux. Like the similarly Linux-powered devices available from Sonos, Denon’s “Heos” wireless streaming speakers offer multi-room (multi-speaker) synchronized audio, and can deliver multiple audio streams from disparate sources to individual speakers or stereo-configured speaker pairs distributed around the home.



  • KDE Ships Third Beta of Applications and Platform 4.14
    KDE has released the third beta of the 4.14 versions of Applications and Development Platform. With API, dependency and feature freezes in place, the focus is now on fixing bugs and further polishing. Your assistance is requested!




  • Happy SysAdmin Day!
    Today is July 25 and that can mean only one thing — it’s SysAdmin Day 2014! SysAdmin Day is one day every year when we express gratitude and thanks to […]


  • How to Fix a Mangled Partition Table on Linux
    A good tool for repairing partition tables and recovering files is TestDisk. TestDisk operates on both the legacy MBR and the newfangled GPT (see Using the New GUID Partition Table in Linux (Goodbye Ancient MBR)) . TestDisk is in most Linux repos, and on SystemRescueCD.


  • ownCloud 7 Release Enhances Open Source Private Clouds
    The recently released open source ownCloud 7 Community Edition introduces an innovative way to share files securely between private clouds, as well as interface enhancements and better ways to work with Microsoft Word documents.


  • The Barnaby Jack Few Knew: Celebrated Hacker Saw Spotlight as 'Necessary Evil'
    When celebrated computer hacker Barnaby Jack died suddenly a year ago at the age of 35, headlines around the world touted the Steve Jobs-style pizazz he brought to cyber-security conferences and his show-stopping stunts such as breaking into ATMs and pacemakers. In hacker circles, he was known as the life of the party.


  • Ubuntu 14.04.1 LTS released
    In today's open source roundup: Canonical releases an update to Ubuntu 14.04. Plus: The NY Times bashes open source for not making enough money, and a review of Deepin 2014.


  • What I Learned from Edward Snowden at the Hacker Conference
    It was 1 PM last Saturday and Edward Snowden was about to be televised. His audience was the crowd at the Hackers On Planet Earth conference, a group of people no one would ever mistake for attendees at a political convention. Amid the sea of black clothing were many unconventional fashion statements: purple bandanas and balloon pants, and tartan kilts, and white robes, and green hair.


  • Program Octave
    Learn how to use Octave shell, program basic Octave scripts, functions, packages and much more...


  • How To Install ownCloud 7 On Ubuntu 14.04
    How To Install ownCloud 7 On Ubuntu 14.04This document describes how to install and configure ownCloud 7 on Ubuntu 14.04. I will also connect to the ownCloud Server's data with another Ubuntu 14.04 Desktop and a Windows 7 machine. ownCloud provides access to your data through a web interface or WebDAV while providing a platform to easily view, sync and share across devices—all under your control. ownCloud’s open architecture is extensible via a simple but powerful API for applications and plugins and works with any storage.


  • Celebrating sysadmins in the cloudy future
    System administration can be a thankless job. To all of the tireless administrators out there who keep the systems we reply upon up and running, today is the day that we say thank you!read more


  • Google devs: Tearing Chrome away from OpenSSL not that easy
    Custom BoringSSL fork not quite a drop-in replacement yetGoogle is trying to migrate its Chrome browser away from the buggy OpenSSL cryptography library toward BoringSSL, its homegrown fork, but swapping out the crypto code is proving more difficult than it sounds.…


  • Security risks posed by smart meters
    In a world of always-on connectivity, Internet of Everything and Internet of Things, where most devices now have an embedded computer, the risk posed by hackers tampering with them cannot be overlooked.



  • How to use awk command in Linux
    Text processing is at the heart of Unix. From pipes to the /proc subsystem, the "everything is a file" philosophy pervades the operating system and all of the tools built for it. Because of this, getting comfortable with text-processing is one of the most important skills for an aspiring Linux system administrator, or even any […]Continue reading...The post How to use awk command in Linux appeared first on Xmodulo.No related FAQ.



Error: It's not possible to reach RSS file http://www.newsforge.com/index.rss ...

  • Amazing Iceberg Collapse Caught On Camera
    Wanda Stead and her husband were boating in the Bay of Exploits in Newfoundland, Canada when they witnessed the massive collapse of an arch-shaped iceberg. It's kind of cool until you remember that for every action there's a deadly icy and wet reaction.





  • Can Big Data Cure Cancer?
    A tale of two twenty-something computer whizzes, a mountain of money from Google, and one of the oldest, most vexing problems of all time.


  • George R. R. Martin Declines To Kill Someone For Once
    He may seem to delight in traumatizing fans by murdering their favorite characters in gruesome ways, but even George R. R. Martin won’t stoop so low as to kill an innocent 13-year-old boy. Not for a mere $250, anyway.







  • Living With The 'Enemy'
    In a Washington home, an Israeli man and a Palestinian man are learning to live side-by-side.


  • Verizon To Start Throttling Unlimited 4G LTE
    Starting in October, if you fall into their top 5% of data hogs bracket and have unlimited data, you could see slowed speeds when attached to a cell site that is experiencing high demand.


  • Congress Has Passed A Bill Making Phone Unlocking Legal In TheU.S.
    Consumers in the U.S. should soon be able to legally unlock their phones for use on other wireless networks. The House of Representatives unanimously passed a bill this afternoon legalizing cell phone unlocking, followingthe lead of the U.S. Senateearlier this summer.



  • Portraits Of America’s New Nomads
    There is a loose tribe living at nature’s margins in the United States, slaughtering goats raised by hand at Idaho’s Lost River and picking cherries growing wild in California’s Marble Mountain Wilderness.




  • How The Mother Of All Sequels Crashed And Burned
    Ten years ago, Benedict Fitzgerald's screenplay helped turn "The Passion of the Christ"into the most successful independent movie ever made. Later, he wrote a follow-up that he thought could be as big — and so did some drug dealers, money launderers, and kidnappers.





  • How To Disarm A Live Mine
    This Cambodian man takes us through the incredibly dangerous task of rendering a mine useless with nothing more than a rifle and a multi-tool. Talk about nerves of steel.




  • Google Is Trying To Define The Perfectly Healthy Human
    Called Baseline Study, the project will collect anonymous genetic and molecular information from 175 people — and later thousands more — to create what the company hopes will be the fullest picture of what a healthy human being should be.











  • New Image Of Ben Affleck As Batman
    The image is part of a 75th anniversary montage of Batman images created for Comic-Con that shows the character’s various representations on film, TV and as games, toys and clothing. Thephotocan be seen at DC’s booth at San Diego Comic-Con.


  • What We Learned This Week
    This week we learned Vegas is changing blackjack, why sleeping in doesn't work and that New York is the unhappiest city in America. Ok, we probably could have guessed that last one.


  • Here's Morgan Freeman On Helium
    Freeman, after some convincing from Fallon, agrees to be interviewed while sucking down a balloon. Spoiler: He sounds like an oompa-loompa.




  • A Global, Interactive Guide To The First World War
    Ten historians from 10 countries give a brief history of the first world war through a global lens. Using original news reports, interactive maps and rarely-seen footage, including extraordinary scenes of troops crossing Mesopotamia on camels and Italian soldiers fighting high up in the Alps, the half-hour film explores the war and its effects from many different perspectives.


  • Arctic Man
    Wild rides and crazed nights at America's most extreme ski race.


  • ISIS Blows Up Jonah's Tomb
    ISIS militants in Iraq have destroyed what is thought to be the burial site of the prophet Jonah. In a video spread widely on the Internet, ISIS appears to have blown up the tomb built for the man who many Jews, Christians and Muslims believe was swallowed by a whale. The Al Qaeda splinter group has made a habit of destroying important religious sites they deem counter to their fundamentalist beliefs.


  • There's A Cthulhu-Based Cryptocurrency Now
    Written in the voodoo cultspeak of futurist horror writer H.P. Lovecraft's short story, "The Call of Cthulhu," the creepy Cthulhu Offerings may be the most confusing digital currency yet.





  • The Down And Dirty History Of TMZ
    How a lawyer from the San Fernando Valley created a gossip empire and transformed himself into the most feared man in Hollywood, all by breaking a few long-held rules and lording over a notorious vault full of secrets.




  • 10 Bar Bets You'll Always Win
    You might win these bets, but depending on your watering hole of choice, you might get your smarmy ass tossed out on the curb too.


  • How Stanford Engineers Created a Fictitious Compression For HBO
    Tekla Perry (3034735) writes Professor Tsachy Weissman and Ph.D student Vinith Misra came up with (almost) believable compression algorithms for HBO's Silicon Valley. Some constraints -- they had to seem plausible, look good when illustrated on a whiteboard, and work with the punchline, "middle out." Next season the engineers may encourage producers to tackle the challenge of local decodability.







  • Australian Government Moving Forward With Anti-Piracy Mandate For ISPs
    angry tapir (1463043) writes Australia is moving closer to a regime under which ISPs will be forced to block access to websites whose "dominant purpose" is to facilitate copyright violations. A secret government discussion paper (PDF) has been leaked and proposes a system of website blocking and expanded liability for ISPs when it comes to "reasonable steps that can be taken ... to discourage or reduce online copyright infringement."







  • Cable Companies: We're Afraid Netflix Will Demand Payment From ISPs
    Dega704 (1454673) writes While the network neutrality debate has focused primarily on whether ISPs should be able to charge companies like Netflix for faster access to consumers, cable companies are now arguing that it's really Netflix who holds the market power to charge them. This argument popped up in comments submitted to the FCC by Time Warner Cable and industry groups that represent cable companies. (National Journal writer Brendan Sasso pointed this out.) The National Cable & Telecommunications Association (NCTA), which represents many companies including Comcast, Time Warner Cable, Cablevision, Cox, and Charter wrote to the FCC: "Even if broadband providers had an incentive to degrade their customers' online experience in some circumstances, they have no practical ability to act on such an incentive. Today's Internet ecosystem is dominated by a number of "hyper-giants" with growing power over key aspects of the Internet experience—including Google in search, Netflix and Google (YouTube) in online video, Amazon and eBay in e-commerce, and Facebook in social media. If a broadband provider were to approach one of these hyper-giants and threaten to block or degrade access to its site if it refused to pay a significant fee, such a strategy almost certainly would be self-defeating, in light of the immediately hostile reaction of consumers to such conduct. Indeed, it is more likely that these large edge providers would seek to extract payment from ISPs for delivery of video over last-mile networks." Related: an article at Gizmodo explains that it takes surprisingly little hardware to replicate (at least most of) Netflix's current online catalog in a local data center.







  • FBI Studied How Much Drones Impact Your Privacy -- Then Marked It Secret
    v3rgEz writes When federal agencies adopt new technology, they're required by law to do Privacy Impact Assessments, which is exactly what the FBI did regarding its secretive drone program. The PIAs are created to help the public and federal government assess what they're risking through the adoption of new technology. That part is a little trickier, since the FBI is refusing to release any of the PIA on its drone project, stating it needs to be kept, er, private to protect national security.







  • The Truth About Solar Storms
    StartsWithABang (3485481) writes On Wednesday, The Washington Post ran a story about a very large solar flare two years ago that missed Earth, but not by too much. From a scientific point of view, what is it that happens when a solar flare interacts with Earth, and what are the potential dangers to both humans and humanities infrastructure? A very good overview, complete with what you can do — as both an individual and a power company — to minimize the risk and the damage when the big one comes. Unlike asteroids, these events happen every few centuries, and in our age of electronics, would now create a legitimate disaster.







  • Compromise Struck On Cellphone Unlocking Bill
    NotSanguine (1917456) writes The U.S. Senate has passed a bill (S.517) today, allowing users to unlock their phones when moving to another provider. From a recent article at thehill.com: "Consumers should be able to use their existing cell phones when they move their service to a new wireless provider," [Sen. Patrick] Leahy said in a statement. "Our laws should not prohibit consumers from carrying their cell phones to a new network, and we should promote and protect competition in the wireless marketplace," he said. [Sen. Chuck] Grassley called the bipartisan compromise "an important step forward in ensuring that there is competition in the industry and in safeguarding options for consumers as they look at new cell phone contracts." "Empowering people with the freedom to use the carrier of their choice after complying with their original terms of service is the right thing to do," he said. The House in February passed a companion bill sponsored on cellphone unlocking from House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.)." Also at Ars Technica, as pointed out by reader jessepdx.







  • The Army Is 3D Printing Warheads
    Jason Koebler writes: In its latest bid to kill more people, more efficiently, and at less cost, the army is planning to print warhead components, according to the latest issue of Army Technology (PDF). "3D printing of warheads will allow us to have better design control and utilize geometries and patterns that previously could not be produced or manufactured," James Zunino, a researcher at the Armament Research, Engineering and Design Center said. "Warheads could be designed to meet specific mission requirements whether it is to improve safety to meet an Insensitive Munitions requirement, or it could have tailorable effects, better control, and be scalable to achieve desired lethality."







  • The NSA's New Partner In Spying: Saudi Arabia's Brutal State Police
    Advocatus Diaboli sends this news from The Intercept: The National Security Agency last year significantly expanded its cooperative relationship with the Saudi Ministry of Interior, one of the world's most repressive and abusive government agencies. An April 2013 top secret memo provided by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden details the agency's plans "to provide direct analytic and technical support" to the Saudis on "internal security" matters. The Saudi Ministry of Interior—referred to in the document as MOI— has been condemned for years as one of the most brutal human rights violators in the world. In 2013, the U.S. State Department reported that "Ministry of Interior officials sometimes subjected prisoners and detainees to torture and other physical abuse," specifically mentioning a 2011 episode in which MOI agents allegedly "poured an antiseptic cleaning liquid down [the] throat" of one human rights activist. The report also notes the MOI's use of invasive surveillance targeted at political and religious dissidents.







  • Russia Posts $110,000 Bounty For Cracking Tor's Privacy
    hypnosec writes: The government of Russia has announced a ~$110,000 bounty to anyone who develops technology to identify users of Tor, an anonymising network capable of encrypting user data and hiding the identity of its users. The public description (in Russian) of the project has been removed now and it only reads "cipher 'TOR' (Navy)." The ministry said it is looking for experts and researchers to "study the possibility of obtaining technical information about users and users' equipment on the Tor anonymous network."







  • Switching From Microsoft Office To LibreOffice Saves Toulouse 1 Million Euros
    jrepin sends this EU report: The French city of Toulouse saved 1 million euro by migrating all its desktops from Microsoft Office to LibreOffice. This project was rooted in a global digital policy which positions free software as a driver of local economic development and employment. Former IT policy-maker Erwane Monthubert said, "Software licenses for productivity suites cost Toulouse 1.8 million euro every three years. Migration cost us about 800,000 euro, due partly to some developments. One million euro has actually been saved in the first three years. It is a compelling proof in the actual context of local public finance. ... France has a high value in free software at the international level. Every decision-maker should know this."







  • Google Looking To Define a Healthy Human
    rtoz writes: Google's moonshot research division, "Google X," has started "Baseline Study," a project designed to collect anonymous genetic and molecular information from 175 people (and later thousands more) to create a complete picture of what a healthy human being should be. The blueprint will help researchers detect health problems such as heart disease and cancer far earlier, focusing medicine on prevention rather than treatment. According to Google, the information from Baseline will be anonymous, and its use will be limited to medical and health purposes. Data won't be shared with insurance companies.







  • SLS Project Coming Up $400 Million Short
    schwit1 writes: A GAO report finds that the Space Launch System is over budget and NASA will need an additional $400 million to complete its first orbital launch in 2017. From the article: "NASA isn't meeting its own requirements for matching cost and schedule resources with the congressional requirement to launch the first SLS in December 2017. NASA usually uses a calculation it calls the 'joint cost and schedule confidence level' to decide the odds a program will come in on time and on budget. 'NASA policy usually requires a 70 percent confidence level for a program to proceed with final design and fabrication,' the GAO report says, and the SLS is not at that level. The report adds that government programs that can't match requirements to resources 'are at increased risk of cost and schedule growth.' In other words, the GAO says SLS is at risk of costing more than the current estimate of $12 billion to reach the first launch or taking longer to get there. Similar cost and schedule problems – although of a larger magnitude – led President Obama to cancel SLS's predecessor rocket system called Constellation shortly after taking office." The current $12 billion estimate is for the program's cost to achieve one unmanned launch. That's four times what it is costing NASA to get SpaceX, Boeing, and Sierra Nevada to build their three spaceships, all scheduled for their first manned launches before 2017.







  • New SSL Server Rules Go Into Effect Nov. 1
    alphadogg writes: Public certificate authorities (CAs) are warning that as of Nov. 1 they will reject requests for internal SSL server certificates that don't conform to new internal domain naming and IP address conventions designed to safeguard networks. The concern is that SSL server digital certificates issued by CAs at present for internal corporate e-mail servers, Web servers and databases are not unique and can potentially be used in man-in-the-middle attacks involving the setup of rogue servers inside the targeted network, say representatives for the Certification Authority/Browser Forum (CA/B Forum), the industry group that sets security and operational guidelines for digital certificates. Members include the overwhelming bulk of public CAs around the globe, plus browser makers such as Microsoft and Apple. The problem today is that network managers often give their servers names like 'Server1' and allocate internal IP addresses so that SSL certificates issued for them through the public CAs are not necessarily globally unique, notes Trend Micro's Chris Bailey.







  • Siberian Discovery Suggests Almost All Dinosaurs Were Feathered
    A new study published in Science (abstract) suggests that most dinosaurs were covered with feathers. This conclusion was drawn after the discovery of fossils belonging to a 1.5-meter-long, two-legged dinosaur called Kulindadromeus zabaikalicus. "The fossils, which included six skulls and many more bones, greatly broaden the number of families of dinosaurs sporting feathers—downy, ribboned, and thin ones in this case—indicating that plumes evolved from the scales that covered earlier reptiles, probably as insulation." Its distinctiveness from earlier theropod fossil discoveries suggests that feathered dinosaurs appeared much further back in history than previously thought. Paleontologist Stephen Brusatte said, "This does mean that we can now be very confident that feathers weren't just an invention of birds and their closest relatives, but evolved much deeper in dinosaur history. I think that the common ancestor of dinosaurs probably had feathers, and that all dinosaurs had some type of feather, just like all mammals have some type of hair."







  • eSports Starting To Go Mainstream
    An anonymous reader writes: eSports have never been more popular, and many large companies are starting to view them in the same light as traditional sports. The amount of money being thrown around is beginning to rival the money exchanged over sports teams. A recent Dota 2 tournament handed out over $10 million in prizes, and Google's $1 billion purchase of game-streaming site Twitch.tv has now been confirmed. But it doesn't end there — companies like Coca-cola, Intel, Nissan, and major movie studios are looking at the audiences being drawn by eSports and realizing the advertising potential. "Last fall, Riot Games sold out the Staples Center for its League of Legends Championship Series Finals. While 12,000 people watched live in the home of the Lakers and Kings, over 32 million tuned in to the livestream." George Woo, head of a global eSports tournament, said, "Attendance to Intel Extreme Masters events has grown 10X with us filling up sport stadiums, where we have visitors lining up to get a seat to watch the competition. Online it has grown 100X, where we now get more viewers watching livestreams for a single event than we'd have tune in for an entire season in the past."







  • Wikipedia Blocks 'Disruptive' Edits From US Congress
    alphatel writes: Wikipedia has blocked anonymous edits from a congressional IP address for 10 days because of "disruptive" behavior. These otherwise anonymous edits were brought to light recently by @Congressedits, a bot that automatically tweets Wikipedia changes that come from Congressional IP addresses. The biography of former U.S. defense secretary Donald Rumsfeld was edited to say that he was an "alien lizard who eats Mexican babies." Mediaite's Wikipedia page was modified to label the site as a "sexist transphobic" publication.







  • Earth In the Midst of Sixth Mass Extinction: the 'Anthropocene Defaunation'
    mspohr writes: A special issue of Science magazine devoted to 'Vanishing Fauna' publishes a series of articles about the man-caused extinction of species and the implications for ecosystems and the climate. Quoting: "During the Pleistocene epoch, only tens of thousands of years ago, our planet supported large, spectacular animals. Mammoths, terror birds, giant tortoises, and saber-toothed cats, as well as many less familiar species such as giant ground sloths (some of which reached 7 meters in height) and glyptodonts (which resembled car-sized armadillos), roamed freely. Since then, however, the number and diversity of animal species on Earth have consistently and steadily declined. Today we are left with a relatively depauperate fauna, and we continue to lose animal species to extinction rapidly. Although some debate persists, most of the evidence suggests that humans were responsible for extinction of this Pleistocene fauna, and we continue to drive animal extinctions today through the destruction of wild lands, consumption of animals as a resource or a luxury, and persecution of species we see as threats or competitors." Unfortunately, most of the detail is behind a paywall, but the summary should be enough to get the point across.







  • Long-range Electric Car World Speed Record Broken By Australian Students
    New submitter is_this_gdog writes: The Sunswift solar car team from UNSW Australia has broken an international world speed record for the fastest long-range electric vehicle, averaging a speed of 107km/h (66mph) over 500km (310miles) from a single charge with their car, eVe. Solar panels were not used for this record (with solar, the car has a range of over 500 miles), the challenge was endurance speed with battery only. There are faster electric cars, and one or two with longer range if you go slow enough — Sunswift eVe is the first to officially do 500kms at highway speeds (pending official FIA approval). Pictures of the car are available here.







  • Amazon's Ambitious Bets Pile Up, and Its Losses Swell
    New submitter shirleymarone sends word that investors are becoming impatient with Amazon's willingness to absorb short-term losses for theoretical long-term gains. The company brought in over $19 billion in revenue last quarter, but reported a net loss of $126 million. The company warned of even greater losses this quarter. Amazon officials exude a serene if vague confidence. "We're not trying to optimize for short-term profits," Thomas J. Szkutak, the chief financial officer, said in a conference call. "We're investing on behalf of customers and share owners," he said. "We're fortunate to have these opportunities." But even the analysts, who are generally enthusiastic about the company and its global ambitions, are asking slightly more pointed questions these days. For all these investments, one analyst asked Mr. Szkutak, why are sales not increasing even faster? His answer: Just wait. ... Amazon, which is based in Seattle, long ago transcended its roots as a simple retailer. In recent weeks it introduced Zocalo, a document storage and sharing service that grew out of its fast-growing web services division. It began a program to allow readers to consume as many e-books as they want for a set monthly fee. And it is starting to ship its long-awaited entry in the smartphone sweepstakes. The phone, the result of years of development by thousands of Amazon programmers and designers, is meeting some resistance from reviewers.







  • How a Solar Storm Two Years Ago Nearly Caused a Catastrophe On Earth
    schwit1 writes: On July 23, 2012, the sun unleashed two massive clouds of plasma that barely missed a catastrophic encounter with the Earth's atmosphere. These plasma clouds, known as coronal mass ejections (CMEs), comprised a solar storm thought to be the most powerful in at least 150 years. "If it had hit, we would still be picking up the pieces," physicist Daniel Baker of the University of Colorado tells NASA. Fortunately, the blast site of the CMEs was not directed at Earth. Had this event occurred a week earlier when the point of eruption was Earth-facing, a potentially disastrous outcome would have unfolded. "Analysts believe that a direct hit could cause widespread power blackouts, disabling everything that plugs into a wall socket. Most people wouldn't even be able to flush their toilet because urban water supplies largely rely on electric pumps. ... According to a study by the National Academy of Sciences, the total economic impact could exceed $2 trillion, or 20 times greater than the costs of a Hurricane Katrina. Multi-ton transformers damaged by such a storm might take years to repair." Steve Tracton put it this way in his frightening overview of the risks of a severe solar storm: "The consequences could be devastating for commerce, transportation, agriculture and food stocks, fuel and water supplies, human health and medical facilities, national security, and daily life in general."







  • Two Cities Ask the FCC To Preempt State Laws Banning Municipal Fiber Internet
    Jason Koebler writes Two cities—Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Wilson, North Carolina—have officially asked the federal government to help them bypass state laws banning them from expanding their community owned, gigabit fiber internet connections. In states throughout the country, major cable and telecom companies have battled attempts to create community broadband networks, which they claim put them at a competitive disadvantage. The FCC will decide if its able to circumvent state laws that have been put in place restricting the practice.







  • Comet To Make Close Call With Mars
    sciencehabit writes In mid-October, a comet sweeping through our inner solar system for the first time will pass near Mars—so close, in fact, that if it were buzzing Earth at the same distance it would fly by well inside our moon's orbit. While material spewing from the icy visitor probably won't trigger the colossal meteor showers on the Red Planet that some scientists predicted, dust and water vapor may still slam into Mars, briefly heating up its atmosphere and threatening orbiting spacecraft. However it affects the planet, the comet should give scientists their closest view yet of a near-pristine visitor from the outer edges of our solar system.







  • Will Your Next Car Be Covered In Morphing Dimples?
    cartechboy writes Golfing and cars, not much in common there. But that's about to change thanks to a new technology from a research lab at MIT called Smorphs. The idea is simple: put a set of dynamic dimples on the exterior of a car to improve its surface aerodynamics and make it slipperier, and therefore faster. Pedro Reis is the mechanical engineering and research spearheading this project. A while ago Mythbusters proved the validity of the dimpled car form in a much more low-tech way. The concept uses a hollow core surrounded by a thick, deformable layer, and a smoother outer skin. When vacuum is applied, the outer layers suck in to form the dimples. The technology is only in its very earliest stages, but we could see this applied to future vehicles in an effort to make them faster and more fuel efficient.







  • Poetry For Sysadmins: Shall I Compare Thee To a Lumbering Bear?
    itwbennett writes Don't forget that July 25th is Sysadmin Day — a good day to show love to the folks who save your butt again and again when you mess up your computer. Forget the chocolate and flowers, long-time sysadmin Sandra Henry-Stocker has tailored some poems to celebrate these under appreciated, hard-working souls.







  • Metamason: Revolutionizing CPAP Masks With 3D Scanning and 3D Printing
    First time accepted submitter Leslie Oliver Karpas writes As millions of Americans with Obstructive Sleep Apnea struggle to get a good night's sleep, one company has harnessed 3D technology to revolutionize CPAP therapy. As 3ders.org reported today, "Metamason is working on custom CPAP masks for sleep apnea patients via 3D scanning, smart geometry, and 3D printing." "We're at the crossroads of 3D technology and personalized medicine," says Metamason's founder and CEO. "There are many medical products that would be infinitely more comfortable and effective with a customized fit. CPAP therapy is the perfect example—it's a very effective treatment with a 50% quit rate, because mass-produced masks are uncomfortable and don't fit properly." CPAP is a respiratory device worn during sleep to treat OSA, which affects 1 in 4 men and 1 in 9 women in the US alone. Metamason's "ScanFitPrint" process for creating their custom Respere masks translates a 3D scan of the patient's face into a 3D printed custom mask that is a perfect individual fit. To print the masks in soft, biocompatible silicone, Metamason invented a proprietary 3D printing process called Investment Molding, which creates wholly integrated products that were previously considered "unmoldable."
















  • Twitch rich as Google flicks $1bn hitch switch, claims snitch
    Gameplay streaming biz and search king refuse to deny fresh gobble rumors
    Google and Twitch were tight-lipped this morning in California – amid swirling rumors that the internet goliath will formally seal a $1bn deal to buy the video-streaming upstart.…






  • Disaster Recovery upstart joins DR 'as a service' gang
    Quorum joins the aaS crowd with DRaaS offering
    Disaster recovery company Quorum uses a customer’s second site or its own cloud site to provide the user with backup and DR location for physical and virtualised server customers, and claims one-click recovery through its on-site onQ appliances.…



  • The XP factor gives MEGA-DISTIE Ingram Q2 sales a boost
    Just don't ask about operating profits...
    The tills rang often for massive global distie Ingram Micro during its second calendar quarter, helped by frenzied PC refresh activity, but squeezing out better long term profits remains a work in progress.…


  • Pinterest diversity stats: Also pale and male (but not as much as Twitter)
    Cats'n'flowers site latest to admit white men rule its roost
    Pinterest is generally used to store images of polka dot knickers, cute animals and bags of artisan pear drops. What might come as a shock to its users is that Pinterest is actually run by the same “stale, pale and male” clique often seen at the rudder of other big Silicon Valley.…






  • Apple smacked with privacy sueball over Location Services
    Class action launched on behalf of 100 million iPhone owners
    A woman has brought a class-action lawsuit for "invasion of privacy" against Apple over claims surrounding the firm's use of Location Services to track iPhone users and store data on their movements.…


  • US judge 'troubled' by Apple's $450m bid to end ebook price-fixing row
    Beak questions whether settlement is fair to customers
    US federal judge Denise Cote is not particularly chuffed with Apple and its proposed $450m settlement in an ebook price-fixing lawsuit – because the odds are stacked against customers if the appeals process goes Cupertino's way.…


  • Sysadmin Day 2014: Quick, there's still time to get the beers in
    He walked over the broken glass, killed the thugs... and er... reconnected the cables*
    It is 25 July, and that means it's Systems Administrators Appreciation Day once more. Sysadmin Day is that one special day a year where syadmins the world over say to each other "Wow, I can't believe we all made it another year", and everyone else forgets that this has been a thing for 14 years.…







  • Roll out the welcome mat to hackers and crackers
    Security chap pens guide to bug bounty programs that won't fail like Yahoo!'s
    A clear and easy to read policy is key to developing a good internal bug bounty program, according to BugCrowd which has published guidelines to help businesses encourage the security community to report vulnerabilities.…



  • Teardown gurus iFixit play with Fire – Amazon's new mobe
    Amazon handset proves a complex bit of kit in repair tests
    The teardown team at repairs biz iFixit has cracked open Amazon's Fire smartmobe, and it seems the new handset is indeed a complex piece of kit even by modern smartphone standards.…


  • Huawei to virtual world: Give us your desktops and no-one gets hurt
    Telecom-directed virty efforts won't be pitched at mainstream workloads … yet
    Huawei's ambitions in the virtualisation market centre on desktop virtualisation and network function virtualisation for telcos, according to the company's CTO for data centre solutions Ron Raffensperger.…



  • Four fake Google haxbots hit YOUR WEBSITE every day
    Goog the perfect ruse to slip into SEO orfice
    One in every 24 Googlebots is a imitation spam-flinging denial of service villain that masquerades as Mountain View to sneak past web perimeter defences, according to security chaps at Incapsula.…





  • Beancounters tell NASA it's too poor to fly planned mega-rocket
    Space Launch System would need another $400m and a lot of time
    The US Government Accounting Office (GAO) has told NASA it has a massive funding shortfall for its ambitious Space Launch System (SLS) rocket if the spacecraft has any chance of blasting off on schedule.…


  • Putin: Crack Tor for me and I'll make you a MILLIONAIRE
    Russian Interior Ministry offers big pile o' roubles for busting pro-privacy browser
    Russia's Interior Ministry has posted a tender seeking parties willing to “study the possibility of obtaining technical information about users (user equipment) TOR anonymous network".…


  • Google devs: Tearing Chrome away from OpenSSL not that easy
    Custom BoringSSL fork not quite a drop-in replacement yet
    Google is trying to migrate its Chrome browser away from the buggy OpenSSL cryptography library toward BoringSSL, its homegrown fork, but swapping out the crypto code is proving more difficult than it sounds.…




  • Come close, dear reader. Past those trees you'll see a non-Microsoft Nokia Oyj in the wild
    Oh, it's a bit wobbly on its feet but it still has its wits about it
    Nokia – the Finnish networking firm, not the Microsoft division that sells low-cost mobes running Windows Phone – reported earnings for another difficult quarter on Thursday, yet showed signs that its operations are beginning to stabilize since punting its Devices and Services business off to Redmond.…




  • Lower prices are BAD FOR CONSUMERS, says Turnbull
    (PS, ACCC, please don't spit in Telstra's soup, okay?)
    Communications minister Malcolm Turnbull has intervened in an Australian Consumer And Competition Commission (ACCC) inquiry, warning Australia's competition regulator not to cut the wholesale price of fixed line services.…




Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM