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  • Debian LTS: DLA-1287-1: zziplib security update
    LinuxSecurity.com: It was discovered that there was a uncontrolled memory allocation issue in zziplib, a ZIP archive library. Remote attackers could leverage this vulnerability to cause a denial of service via a specially-crafted file.







  • Fedora 27: krb5 Security Update
    LinuxSecurity.com: Fix CVE-2018-5729, CVE-2018-5730. These are low-impact, requiring administrator access to exploit. ---- Fix leak in previous version. ---- Always read config snippets in alphabetical order per-directory.







  • Create a wiki on your Linux desktop with Zim
    There's no denying the usefulness of a wiki, even to a non-geek. You can do so much with one—write notes and drafts, collaborate on projects, build complete websites. And so much more.read more


  • Getting started with SQL
    Building a database using SQL is simpler than most people think. In fact, you don't even need to be an experienced programmer to use SQL to create a database. In this article, I'll explain how to create a simple relational database management system (RDMS) using MySQL 5.6. Before I get started, I want to quickly thankSQL Fiddle, which I used to run my script. It provides a useful sandbox for testing simple scripts.read more


  • Windows slithers on to Arm, legless?
    It can't be worse than RT - and isn'tComment Perhaps more by accident or design, Microsoft managed to lower expectations for Windows on Arm last week – but not set them so low it kills off interest in the platform.…


  • How to Install a LAMP Server on Debian 9 Stretch Linux
    The LAMP server is the cornerstone of Linux web hosting. In the early days of dynamic web content LAMP was what won Linux the crown in the web space, and it still is responsible for powering a very large portion of the Internet's sites. If you're looking to set up a LAMP stack to host your website, it'd be hard to find a better option to build it on than Debian Stretch. Debian is, after all, well known for its stability, security, and massive package repositories, and Stretch is certainly no exception.


  • Oxidizing Fedora: Try Rust and its applications today
    In recent years, it has become increasingly important to develop software that minimizes security vulnerabilities. Memory management bugs are a common cause of these vulnerabilities. To that end, the Mozilla community has spent the last several years building the Rust...


  • OpenVAS Ubuntu Installation and Tutorial
    OpenVAS is the open source version of Nessus, which emerged after Nessus became a closed source scanner. It is considered one of the best security scanners. In this article I will show you how to install OpenVAS on Ubuntu and also provide a tutorial on how to use it for security scanning.


  • Liferea hack: add links to ABC (Australia) news items
    To see the the online ABC news article in Liferea's browser corresponding to a headline, you have to double-click on the headline, or right-click on it and and choose "Open In Browser". This works because the article's URL is indeed included in the RSS file, although you can't see it.To get that link into the descriptive text, I wrote a simple hack with AWK, described in detail below.


  • Bang & Olufsen's RPi add-on brings digital life to old speakers
    B[he]O and HiFiBerry have launched an open source, DIY “Beocreate 4” add-on for the Raspberry Pi that turns vintage speakers into digitally amplified, wireless-enabled smart speakers with the help of a 180-Watt 4-channel amplifier, a DSP, and a DAC. Bang & Olufsen has collaborated with HiFiBerry to...


  • Learn to write Linux Device Driver
    The course covers the key issues in developing and testing Linux device drivers. This three days course provides substantial practice with the key steps in developing Linux device drivers. The course shows attendees how device drivers work with the Linux kernel, how to compile and load drivers, how to debug drivers, as well as other essential topics.




  • How Kubernetes became the solution for migrating legacy applications
    In the early days of the internet, if you wanted to launch an application, you had to buy or rent hardware. This was a physical server or a rack of servers, and you needed one server per application, so it was expensive. In 2001, VMware came out with virtualization—software that allowed users to run multiple applications on the same hardware. The cost savings for businesses were tremendous.


  • Bogus Linux vulnerability gets publicity
    I am so sick and tired of crap security news about Android and Linux. In the latest example, GoSecure claims it's discovered Chaos: a Stolen Backdoor Rising Again. Yeah. Right. Let's look closer.



  • Best Web Browser
    Take a look at the rankings for this week's Readers' Choice category. When the Firefox team released Quantum in November 2017, they boasted it was "over twice as fast as Firefox from 6 months ago", and Linux Journal readers generally agreed, going as far as to name it their favorite web browser.





  • How to Install Apache Maven on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
    Apache Maven is a software project management tool based on the POM (Project, Object, Model) concept. Maven is a build automation tool used primarily for Java-based projects. In this tutorial, I will show you step-by-step how to install and configure Apache Maven on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS.


Error: It's not possible to reach RSS file http://www.newsforge.com/index.rss ...




  • This Wearable Delivers On Its Health Promises
    This health wearable knows that how you rest is as important as how you work out. The Oura ring tracks both and then does something truly remarkable: tells you how to get better.





  • This Design Generation Has Failed
    Today's UX designers have failed to act in the best interest of users. To right the ship, the next generation has to make three significant changes.






  • This HD, Wide-Angle, Waterproof Action Cam Is $50
    The Action Cam features 1080p recording, with the option to film in loops or capture high-quality photos with the 12MP lens. Designed to be jitter-free, with a wide-angle lens, this durable camera is just the thing to capture fast-paced action wherever you go.



  • The Hacker Who Took On The USA... And Won
    After four years battling extradition to the United States, Lauri Love — a British activist accused of hacking the FBI, US Army, US Missile Defense and NASA websites — speaks out openly for the first time following his victory, and reflects on facing legal action in the British courts.



  • Worst Roommate Ever
    One scheming, sinister man. A dozen unsuspecting victims. The ultimate Craigslist nightmare.


  • No, Foreign Bots Didn't Force Al Franken To Resign
    On Monday morning, Newsweek published a story alleging that foreign bots played a major role in pushing Al Franken to resign after eight women alleged that he groped them. That story turned out to be majorly flawed — and today, Newsweek officially retracted it.







  • Testing Apple Maps Vs. Google Maps Vs. Waze
    Which navigation appestimatesthe shortest travel time? How does each app over/underestimate travel times? And which navigation app actually gets you to your destination most quickly?





















  • The Tragedy Of Erik Killmonger
    The revolutionary ideals ofBlack Panther’s profound and complex villain have been twisted into a desire for hegemony.





  • The Great Big Spotify Scam
    A Bulgarian playlist-maker scammed the Spotify payout system for months last year — and could well have made themselves a millionaire off Daniel Ek’s platform.


  • Natalie Portman Doesn't Want To Live In Oblivion
    In an interview with BuzzFeed News, Portman discusses "Annihilation," Hollywood's Time's Up revolution, learning from Reese Witherspoon and her regret over signing the Roman Polanski petition.


  • Apple In Talks To Buy Cobalt Directly From Miners
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from Bloomberg: Apple Inc. is in talks to buy long-term supplies of cobalt directly from miners for the first time, according to people familiar with the matter, seeking to ensure it will have enough of the key battery ingredient amid industry fears of a shortage driven by the electric vehicle boom. The iPhone maker is one of the world's largest end users of cobalt for the batteries in its gadgets, but until now it has left the business of buying the metal to the companies that make its batteries. The talks show that the tech giant is keen to ensure that cobalt supplies for its iPhone and iPad batteries are sufficient, with the rapid growth in battery demand for electric vehicles threatening to create a shortage of the raw material. About a quarter of global cobalt production is used in smartphones. Apple is seeking contracts to secure several thousand metric tons of cobalt a year for five years or longer. Its first discussions on cobalt deals with miners were more than a year ago, and it may end up deciding not to go ahead with any deal, another person said.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • 100-Page Report Warns of the Many Dangers of AI
    dmoberhaus writes: Last year, 26 top AI researchers from around the globe convened in Oxford to discuss the biggest threats posed by artificial intelligence. The result of this two day conference was published today as a 100-page report. The report details three main areas where AI poses a threat: political, physical systems, and cybersecurity. It discusses the specifics of these threats, which range from political strife caused by fake AI-generated videos to catastrophic failure of smart homes and autonomous vehicles, as well as intentional threats, such as autonomous weapons. Although the researchers offer only general guidance for how to deal with these threats, they do offer a path forward for policy makers.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • New Lawsuit Accuses Tesla of Knowingly Selling Defective Vehicles
    A new lawsuit from a former Tesla employee claims the company knowingly sold defective cars, and that the employee was demoted and eventually fired after reporting the practice to his superiors. The lawsuit was filed in late January in New Jersey Superior Court under the Conscientious Employee Protection Act (CEPA). The Verge reports: The former employee, Adam Williams, worked for Tesla as a regional manager in New Jersey dating back to late 2011. While there, he says he watched the company fail "to disclose to consumers high-dollar, pre-delivery damage repairs" before delivering its vehicles, according to the complaint. Instead, he says the company sold these cars as "used," or labeled as "demo/loaner" vehicles. "There's no merit to this lawsuit. Mr. Williams' description of how Tesla sells used or loaner vehicles is totally false and not how we do things at Tesla," a representative for the company said in response to the lawsuit. "It's also at odds with the fact that we rank highest in customer satisfaction of any car brand, with more owners saying they'd buy a Tesla again than any other manufacturer. Mr. Williams was terminated at Tesla for performance reasons, not for any other reason." The lawyer for the plaintiff could not be reached in time for publish.   Williams says in the court filing that he reported this behavior in late 2016 and early 2017 to his supervisor, as well as Lenny Peake, Tesla's East Coast Regional Manager, and Jerome Guillen, a company vice president. Shortly after that, he claims, he was demoted to service manager of the Springfield, New Jersey Tesla store. He then says he was demoted again later in the year to a "mobile manager" position and was ultimately fired in September 2017. In the lawsuit, Williams argues that he was terminated for reporting the alleged lawbreaking practices, and he should therefore be covered by CEPA's whistleblower protection.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Snapchat Responds To Change.Org Petition Complaining About the App's Redesign
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from TechCrunch: Snapchat has posted an official response to users who signed a petition on Change.org asking the company to reverse its controversial update, which people say makes the app more difficult to use. In the response, Snapchat promises to make a few more changes to the Friends and Discover section in order to address user complaints. These changes were announced yesterday, along with GIF stickers from Giphy. The backlash against Snapchat has been growing in the months since the company rolled out a major revamp, which aimed to make the social app more accessible to a mainstream audience. Snapchat users have left the app bad reviews, complained on social media, turned to rival Instagram, and they signed a Change.org petition entitled, "Remove the new Snapchat update."   Last night, Snapchat posted an official response to the petition, reiterating its stance but also promising a few tweaks that may help to address users' concerns. Specifically, the company said that "beginning soon on iOS and with Android in the coming weeks" it will introduce tabs in the Friends section and in Discover, which it says will make it easier for users to find the Stories they want. This update will let users sort things like Stories, Group Chats, and Subscriptions. Whether these tabs will placate users who just want the old Snapchat back remains to be seen.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Instead of Slowing Down Innovation To Protect Few People, Policymakers Should Focus On Helping Displaced Workers Transition Into New Jobs, ITIF Suggests
    A recently published report by Information Technology & Innovation Foundation (ITIF) argues that rather than slow down change to protect a small number of workers at the expense of the vast majority, policymakers should focus on doing significantly more to help workers transition easily into new jobs and new occupations [PDF]. From a report: There has been growing speculation that a coming wave of innovation -- indeed, a tsunami -- powered by artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics, will disrupt labor markets, generate mass unemployment, and shift the few jobs that remain into the insecure "gig economy." Kneejerk "solutions" from such technology Cassandras include ideas like taxing "robots" and implementing universal basic income for everyone, employed or not. The first would slow needed productivity growth, employed or not; the second would reduce worker opportunity. The truth is these technologies will provide a desperately needed boost to productivity and wages, but that does not mean no one will be hurt. There are always winners and losers in major economic transitions. But rather than slow down change to protect a modest number of workers at the expense of the vast majority, policymakers should focus on doing significantly more to help those who are dislocated transition easily into new jobs and new occupations. Improving policies to help workers navigate what is likely to be a more turbulent labor market is not something that should be done just out of fairness, although it is certainly fair to help workers who are either hurt by change or at risk of being hurt. But absent better labor market transition policies, there is a real risk that public and elite sentiment will turn staunchly against technological change, seeing it as fundamentally destructive and unfair.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Poland's Central Bank Accused of Paying YouTubers To Make Videos That Attack the Legitimacy of Cryptocurrencies
    Poland's central bank has been accused of hiring YouTubers to "start a smear campaign" against cryptocurrencies in the country, Business Insider reports. From the story: According to Business Insider Poland, the Narodowy Bank Polski spent around 91,000 zloty ($27,300) on a marketing campaign designed to attack the legitimacy of cryptocurrencies. The money was spent on platforms including Google and Facebook, but was also used to pay a Polish Youtube partner network called Gamellon. The Gamellon network reportedly represents many of Poland's top YouTubers, including popular prankster Marcin Dubiel. In December, Dubiel published a video titled "STRACILEM WSZYSTKIE PIENIADZE?!" -- which loosely translates as "I LOST ALL MY MONEY?!" In the satirical video, Dubiel invests all his money in a fake cryptocurrency called Dubielcoin, gets rich, but then sees its value plunge and loses everything. It has racked up over 500,000 views.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Matching DNA To a Diet Doesn't Work
    DNA testing won't guide dieters to the weight-loss regimen most likely to work for them, scientists reported on Tuesday. From a report: Despite some earlier studies claiming that genetic variants predict whether someone has a better chance of shedding pounds on a low-carbohydrate or a low-fat diet, and despite a growing industry premised on that notion, the most rigorous study so far found no difference in weight loss between overweight people on diets that "matched" their genotype and those on diets that didn't. The findings make it less likely that genetics might explain why only some people manage to lose weight on a low-carb diet like Atkins and why others succeed with a low-fat one (even though the vast majority of dieters don't keep off whatever pounds they lose). Unlike cancer treatments, diets can't be matched to genotype, the new study shows. The results underline "how, for most people, knowing genetic risk information doesn't have a big impact," said Timothy Caulfield, of the University of Alberta, a critic of quackery.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Intel Has a New Spectre and Meltdown Firmware Patch For You To Try Out
    Mark Wilson writes: The Spectre/Meltdown debacle continues to rumble on, and now the chip manufacturer has announced the availability of a new 'microcode solution' to the vulnerability. The updated firmware applies to 6th, 7th and 8th Generation Intel Core devices, and the release sees the company crossing its fingers and hoping that everything works out this time. This is Intel's second attempt at patching the vulnerability, and this time around both the company and its customers will be praying that the fix for Skylake, Kaby Lake and Coffee Lake chips actually does the job.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • uTorrent Client Affected by Some Pretty Severe Security Flaws
    A Google security researcher has found multiple security flaws affecting the uTorrent web and desktop client that allow an attacker to infect a victim with malware or collect data on the users' past downloads, reports BleepingComputer. From the report: The vulnerabilities have been discovered by Google Project Zero security researcher Tavis Ormandy, and they impact uTorrent Web, a new web-based version of the uTorrent BitTorrent client, and uTorrent Classic, the old uTorrent client that most people know. Ormandy says that both uTorrent clients are exposing an RPC server -- on port 10000 (uTorrent Classic) and 19575 (uTorrent Web). The expert says that attackers can hide commands inside web pages that interact with this open RPC server. The attacker only needs to trick a user with a vulnerable uTorrent client to access a malicious web page. Furthermore, the uTorrent clients are also vulnerable to DNS rebinding -- a vulnerability that allows the attacker to legitimize his requests to the RPC server.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Slashdot Asks: What Do People Misunderstand or Underappreciate About Apple?
    In an interview with Fast Company, Apple CEO Tim Cook says people who have not used his company's products miss "how different Apple is versus other technology companies." A person who is just looking at the company's revenues and profits, says Cook, might think that Apple "is good at making money." But he says "that's not who we are. In Cook's view, Apple is: We're a group of people who are trying to change the world for the better, that's who we are. For us, technology is a background thing. We don't want people to have to focus on bits and bytes and feeds and speeds. We don't want people to have to go to multiple [systems] or live with a device that's not integrated. We do the hardware and the software, and some of the key services as well, to provide a whole system. We do that in such a way that we infuse humanity into it. We take our values very seriously, and we want to make sure all of our products reflect those values. There are things like making sure that we're running our [U.S.] operations on 100% renewable energy, because we don't want to leave the earth worse than we found it. We make sure that we treat well all the people who are in our supply chain. We have incredible diversity, not as good as we want, but great diversity, and it's that diversity that yields products like this. What do you think?
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Apple CEO Tim Cook: 'I've Only Had Good Years'
    Business Insider: Under CEO Tim Cook's watch, Apple has sold hundreds of millions of iPhones, booked hundreds of billions of dollars in profit, and launched new products like AirPods and Apple Watch. In fact, Cook says, he's never had a bad year as CEO of Apple. "I've only had good years. No, seriously," he said in an interview with Fast Company. "Even when we were idling from a revenue point of view -- it was like $6 billion every year -- those were some incredibly good years because you could begin to feel the pipeline getting better, and you could see it internally. Externally, people couldn't see that," he continued.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • 'Tech Companies Should Stop Pretending AI Won't Destroy Jobs'
    Kai-Fu Lee, the founder and CEO of Sinovation Ventures and president of the Sinovation Ventures Artificial Intelligence Institute, believes that we're not ready for the massive societal upheavals on the way. He writes for MIT Technology Review: The rise of China as an AI superpower isn't a big deal just for China. The competition between the US and China has sparked intense advances in AI that will be impossible to stop anywhere. The change will be massive, and not all of it good. Inequality will widen. As my Uber driver in Cambridge has already intuited, AI will displace a large number of jobs, which will cause social discontent. Consider the progress of Google DeepMind's AlphaGo software, which beat the best human players of the board game Go in early 2016. It was subsequently bested by AlphaGo Zero, introduced in 2017, which learned by playing games against itself and within 40 days was superior to all the earlier versions. Now imagine those improvements transferring to areas like customer service, telemarketing, assembly lines, reception desks, truck driving, and other routine blue-collar and white-collar work. It will soon be obvious that half of our job tasks can be done better at almost no cost by AI and robots. This will be the fastest transition humankind has experienced, and we're not ready for it. Not everyone agrees with my view. Some people argue that it will take longer than we think before jobs disappear, since many jobs will be only partially replaced, and companies will try to redeploy those displaced internally. But even if true, that won't stop the inevitable. Others remind us that every technology revolution has created new jobs as it displaced old ones. But it's dangerous to assume this will be the case again.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • AI Experts Say Some Advances Should Be Kept Secret
    AI could reboot industries and make the economy more productive; it's already infusing many of the products we use daily. But a new report [PDF] by more than 20 researchers from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, OpenAI, and the Electronic Frontier Foundation warns that the same technology creates new opportunities for criminals, political operatives, and oppressive governments -- so much so that some AI research may need to be kept secret. From a report: [...] The study is less sure of how to counter such threats. It recommends more research and debate on the risks of AI and suggests that AI researchers need a strong code of ethics. But it also says they should explore ways of restricting potentially dangerous information, in the way that research into other "dual use" technologies with weapons potential is sometimes controlled.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Lawsuits Threaten Infosec Research -- Just When We Need it Most
    This year, two security reporters and one researcher will fight for their professional lives in court. Steve Ragan, senior staff writer at tech news site CSO, and Dan Goodin, security editor at Ars Technica, were last year named defendants in two separate lawsuits. The cases are different, but they have a common theme: they are being sued by the companies covered in articles they wrote. From a report: Although lawsuits targeting reporters, particularly on the security beat, are rare, legal threats are an occupational hazard that reporters are all too aware of -- from companies threatening to call an editor to demand a correction -- or else -- to a full-blown lawsuit. But the inevitable aftermath is a "chilling effect." White-hat hackers and security researchers hesitate to report vulnerabilities and weaknesses to technology firms for fear of facing legal retribution. With nation state attackers targeting elections and critical national security infrastructure on a near-daily basis, security research is needed more than ever.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • The Car of the Future Will Sell Your Data
    Picture this: You're driving home from work, contemplating what to make for dinner, and as you idle at a red light near your neighborhood pizzeria, an ad offering $5 off a pepperoni pie pops up on your dashboard screen. Are you annoyed that your car's trying to sell you something, or pleasantly persuaded? From a report: Telenav, a company developing in-car advertising software, is betting you won't mind much. Car companies -- looking to earn some extra money -- hope so, too. Automakers have been installing wireless connections in vehicles and collecting data for decades. But the sheer volume of software and sensors in new vehicles, combined with artificial intelligence that can sift through data at ever-quickening speeds, means new services and revenue streams are quickly emerging. The big question for automakers now is whether they can profit off all the driver data they're capable of collecting without alienating consumers or risking backlash from Washington. "Carmakers recognize they're fighting a war over customer data," said Roger Lanctot, who works with automakers on data monetization as a consultant for Strategy Analytics. "Your driving behavior, location, has monetary value, not unlike your search activity."
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.








  • Bosch and Daimler jump in together on driverless vehicle tech
    Self-parking cars - and a lot of practical R&D going on
    BCW18 Bosch’s Connected World conference opened with a demo of its automated valet technology. Though the firm’s chief exec, Volkmar Denner, drove the car up to its drop-off point, the self-parking mode failed to engage.…


  • Farewell, Android Pay. We hardly tapped you
    You still need two Google apps to do everything, though
    “Android Pay” is no more, as Google attempts to unify its disparate transaction options under one brand. The redesigned, rebranded Google Pay app – which supersedes Android Pay – is already in the Google Play Store.…







  • Use ad blockers? Mine some Monero to get access to news, says US site
    Cryptocurrency trend moves into publishing as Salon comes up with plan to make customers pay
    US website Salon.com has decided that if people want to block its ads, they should pay in another way - by allowing the biz to use their computing power to mine for cryptocurrency.…


  • A game to 'vaccinate' people against fake news? Umm... Fake news
    Boffins' plan to prime the public against misinformation nice idea but misses mark
    Separating fact from fiction is a very different challenge in the fake news age, and there’s no end of people ready to opine on how to do it. Now boffins from famed Brit university Cambridge have decided to get in on the action by launching a game to "vaccinate" the public against it.…


  • London Mayor's chief digi officer: 'Have faith and give us a chance'
    The Blackwell says data can help capital cope with 1m more bods
    Cynics could be forgiven for seeing the Mayor of London’s newly created six-figure chief digital officer role as a policy wonk title. Speaking to The Register on a rainy morning at City Hall, Theo Blackwell describes it as "a digital leadership role."…


  • Windows slithers on to Arm, legless?
    It can't be worse than RT - and isn't
    Comment Perhaps more by accident or design, Microsoft managed to lower expectations for Windows on Arm last week – but not set them so low it kills off interest in the platform.…


  • Oh, Bucket! AWS in S3 status-checking tool free-for-all
    'Your data is waiting for the internet to download it' warning lights are now free
    Amazon Web Services has signalled it's still worried about poorly configured buckets in its Simple Storage Service (S3) by making one of the tools to manage them free.…


  • Careful with the 'virtual hugs' says new FreeBSD Code of Conduct
    Cue virtual outrage and actual culture wars skirmishes
    The FreeBSD project completely updated its code-of-conduct in early February, complete with a definition of "harassment" that included "Physical contact and simulated physical contact (e.g., textual descriptions like "*hug*" or "*backrub*") without consent or after a request to stop." And as will happen these days, considerable controversy and vivid online debate has been the result.…


  • AMD lures Cisco's server CTO into Epyc new data center gig
    He's also a player on the Transaction Processing Performance Council
    Exclusive AMD's push into servers has accelerated just a little after the chip-designer wooed Cisco's chief technology officer for UCS servers to join its ranks.…





  • Australia joins the 'decrypt it or we'll legislate' club
    At least it only wants to break crypto after getting a warrant
    Australia's home affairs minister Peter Dutton has waded into the global crypto debate, uttering the familiar demand that the tech sector provide what the politicians want while adding that the government will protect Australians from cyber-threats.…


  • Q: Why did the Cisco cross the network? A: To automate what's on the other side
    Switchzilla wants telcos to let it drive all their kit, regardless of who made it
    Cisco's extended its Network Services Orchestrator (NSO) and WAN Automation Engine in the hope that service providers will see them as a way to achieve automated management of all the kit in their networks, regardless of who made it.…



  • Microsoft Australia changes App Store T&Cs to pay GST
    When Australians buy apps on the Store, punters' sales taxes will come on shore
    Microsoft Australia's taken further steps to ensure that Australia's goods and services tax (GST) is collected on apps sold at the Microsoft Store.…




  • Test crash dummies: Pearson VUE broke half-way into all-day exam
    Trainees spent months prepping for web assessment... that fell over hours in
    Imagine you'd just spent 18 months of your life working towards a big certification exam that could make or break your career and, come the big day, the web-hosted test fell over.…



  • Is HCI and ops automation really threatening your job?
    Let's do a quick reality check
    Reg reader survey The march of automation is unavoidable. This is as true in IT as it is in any other profession. From a jobs perspective, some people will win and some will lose. Either way, things will often get shaken up and the status quo threatened.…




  • Big Blue plumps up storage line with filer and fabrics
    Spectrum goes all NASty, FlashSystem base box getting NVMe fabric access
    IBM is adding filer software to its storage offerings, NVMe fabric access to its base all-flash array, and other features across its storage portfolio in a bumper Big Blue storage news day.…




  • iPhone X 'slump' is real, whisper supply chain moles
    There are now 30 million X-shaped holes in Apple's estimates. Ouch
    Samsung has provided confirmation that iPhone X sales are way below Apple's estimates for the much-hyped, tenth anniversary special. The miscalculation could end up benefitting Android owners.…






  • Scality CEO: About that C-suite throttling...
    We didn't strictly need a marketing chief or a president or a COO...
    More details have emerged of C-suite axe swinging at Scality with chief marketing officer Paul Turner getting the chop - still he lasted longer than his predecessor.…


  • Crunch time: Maplin in talks to sell the business
    Pre-pack administration looms if retailer can't find a new parent
    Ailing gadget souk Maplin is locked in eleventh-hour talks with a potential buyer of the chain but the company may be placed into the hands of an administrator if an agreement cannot be reached.…


  • Capita data centres hit by buttload of outages
    '60 is not a high number,' says press handler. O rly?
    Exclusive Hard-pressed outsourcing titan Capita wrestled with almost sixty separate outages at its data centres in the space of just half a year, The Register can exclusively reveal.…



  • Sorry, I can't hear you, the line's VoLTE
    The path to all-IP calls is not smooth. Just ask EE
    EE has improved the reliability of its voice calls after a bumpy transition to an all-IP mobile network, according to network sleuth RootMetrics.…


  • Veritas loses its Vision, kills global customer knees-up
    Warm wine and sarnies to be served up at 'local' Solutions Days instead
    Veritas has canned its annual Veritas Vision marketing extravaganza in preference of smaller, regional get togethers for channel and end-user customers.…


  • Teensy plastic shields are the big new thing in 2018's laptop crop
    Webcam shields, security integration, USB-C and micro-desktops are the moderately hot spots for the PC industry
    The PC market may be in decline but someone is going to buy about 300 million of them this year. And because The Register knows that plenty of our readers are responsible for PC purchasing, deployment and maintenance … here we are with our annual guide to what's new and notable among the new models from HP, Lenovo and Dell, the top three PC vendors.…



Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM