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  • Mandriva: 2014:144: live
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated live fix security vulnerability:The live555 RTSP streaming server and client libraries before2013.11.29 are vulnerable to buffer overflows in RTSP command parsingthat potentially allow for arbitrary code execution when connected[More...]


  • Mandriva: 2014:143: phpmyadmin
    LinuxSecurity.com: Multiple vulnerabilities has been discovered and corrected inphpmyadmin:Cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in thePMA_getHtmlForActionLinks function in libraries/structure.lib.php in[More...]


  • Mandriva: 2014:142: apache
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated apache package fixes security vulnerabilities:A race condition flaw, leading to heap-based buffer overflows,was found in the mod_status httpd module. A remote attacker able toaccess a status page served by mod_status on a server using a threaded[More...]


  • Mandriva: 2014:141: java-1.7.0-openjdk
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated java-1.7.0-openjdk packages fix security vulnerabilities:It was discovered that the Hotspot component in OpenJDK did notproperly verify bytecode from the class files. An untrusted Javaapplication or applet could possibly use these flaws to bypass Java[More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:0981-01: kernel: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated kernel packages that fix multiple security issues, several bugs, and add one enhancement are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. The Red Hat Security Response Team has rated this update as having [More...]


  • Mandriva: 2014:140: owncloud
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated owncloud package fixes security vulnerability:Owncloud versions 5.0.17 and 6.0.4 fix an unspecified securityvulnerability, as well as many other bugs.[More...]


  • Mandriva: 2014:139: nss
    LinuxSecurity.com: A vulnerability has been found and corrected in mozilla NSS:Use-after-free vulnerability in the CERT_DestroyCertificate functionin libnss3.so in Mozilla Network Security Services (NSS) 3.x, as usedin Firefox before 31.0, Firefox ESR 24.x before 24.7, and Thunderbird[More...]



  • Red Hat: 2014:0949-01: kernel: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated kernel packages that fix one security issue are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.2 Advanced Update Support. The Red Hat Security Response Team has rated this update as having [More...]




  • Company Offering Open-Source Biological Reagents Hopes To Recapitulate Free Software's Success
    It's well-known that monopolies can lead to price-gouging, which produces effects like this: "I still have no idea how people can get away with charging several thousand dollars for a milligram of recombinant protein. That's an amount that you can see with the naked eye, if your eyesight is really good, but even then, you can see it only just barely. If you had to make a recombinant protein in your undergraduate biology class, then you know that the cost of doing this is essentially the cost of highly refined sugar water (= culture media) plus the cost of highly refined salt water (= chromatography buffers)."


  • Nostalgic Gaming On Linux With Good Old Games
    Thanks to the recent Linux support provided by DRM-free classic games provider, GOG.com, getting that nostalgic kick on Linux has never been easier. In this article I'll also detail a few of my favourite classic games that are now available to play in Linux.


  • Magellan GPS takes Android for an RV adventure
    Magellan unveiled an Android-based navigation tablet for RVs with a 7-inch, 800 x 480 touchscreen, WiFi and Bluetooth, and real-time traffic updates. The RoadMate RV9490T-LMB appears to be Magellan’s first Android-based automotive GPS, and it’s specifically aimed at recreational vehicle owners. Magellan still uses Windows Mobile in many of its navigation devices.


  • Review: Linux Mint 17 "Qiana" MATE
    There were some issues with Mupen64Plus that I did not expect, and some with Compiz that I did. Leaving those aside, though, Linux Mint delivered a solid and reliable experience again, and I support the move to an only-LTS release schedule.


  • Silicon Mechanics Gives Back
    Silicon Mechanics, Inc., announced this week that Wayne State University (WSU) is the recipient of the company’s 3rd Annual Research Cluster Grant. This includes donation of a complete high-performance compute cluster from Silicon Mechanics and several of its partners.


  • open a url highlighted from anywhere on your desktop with this quick tip for Fedora
    Sometimes when i am using certain applications (especially text editors), the applications themselves do not make URLs that are written out clickable and openable in my default browser. Usually, this would result in me having to highlight the link, copy it to the clipboard, switch to my web browser, open a new tab, paste the link and go.



  • Women interns rocking open source at Xen Project
    With mid-term evaluations just around the corner for many technology-focused summer internship programs, here's a closer look at how the Google Summer of Code (GSoC) and Outreach Program for Women (OPW) are helping mentors as well as interns.


  • Zurmo customer relationship manager tutorial
    Customer relationship management (CRM) is a critical tool – but bored customers can spell disaster. Zurmo has the answer. All businesses thrive on customers, and managing the customer relationships is one of the most important day-to-day tasks. In this guide we’re looking at customer relationship management with a twist – Zurmo, the gamified CRM that could change your customer interactions for the better.


  • The making of the Raspberry Pi Model B+
    The Director of Hardware at the Raspberry Pi Foundation, James Adams, walks through the making of the new and improved Raspberry Pi Model B+ and reveals details of the Model A+…



  • Akademy 2014 Keynotes: Sascha Meinrath and Cornelius Schumacher
    Akademy 2014 will kick off on September 6 in Brno, Czech Republic; our keynote speakers will be opening the first two days. Continuing a tradition, the first keynote speaker is from outside the KDE community, while the second is somebody you all know. On Saturday, Sascha Meinrath will speak about the dangerous waters he sees our society sailing into, and what is being done to help us steer clear of the cliffs. Outgoing KDE e.V. Board President, Cornelius Schumacher, will open Sunday's sessions with a talk about what it is to be KDE and why it matters.




  • Palm-sized mini PC projects display, uses IR for touch
    TouchPico is prepping an Android 4.2 mini-PC that doubles as a pico-projector and approximates touch input via an infrared stylus and camera. It’s not enough to offer just another straight-ahead pico projector these days. Sprint’s recent, ZTE-built LivePro, for example, doubles as a mobile hotspot and features an embedded display, and Promate’s LumiTab is also a tablet. Now a startup called TouchPico offers a similarly Android-based TouchPico device that adds touch input to projected images.


  • Linode Releases Open Source Cloud Hosting Documentation
    Cloud hosting provider Linode has made the documentation for its platform open source, allowing anyone to access the information and contribute to it. Infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS) server and cloud hosting provider Linode declared its library of guides and tutorials "open source" this week, inviting the community to peruse and contribute to the documentation for deploying cloud applications on the company's open source-friendly platform.


  • Lawsuit threatens to break new ground on the GPL and software licensing issues
    When Versata Software sued Ameriprise Financial Services for breaching its software license, it unwittingly unearthed a GPL violation of its own and touched off another lawsuit that could prove to be a leading case on free and open source software licensing. This post takes a look at the legal issues raised by both cases and what they mean for FOSS producers and users.read more



  • GUADEC 2014, Day Four: Hardware, New IDE for GNOME
    The fourth day of GUADEC was mostly devoted to hardware. Attendees learned what it takes to integrate hardware with the desktop, how GNOME does continuous performance testing, how sandboxed apps […]


  • Android crypto blunder exposes users to highly privileged malware
    The majority of devices running Google's Android operating system are susceptible to hacks that allow malicious apps to bypass a key security sandbox so they can steal user credentials, read e-mail, and access payment histories and other sensitive data, researchers have warned. The high-impact vulnerability has existed in Android since the release of version 2.1 in early 2010, researchers from Bluebox Security said.


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  • Why Birds Make Weird Circles On Weather Radars
    After a swarm of mayflies large enough to appear on weather radar rose up from the Mississippi River, causing car crashes and grossing out citizens of western Wisconsin, another ring of non-weather-related blip surfaced on radar this morning. Just south of Cedar Lake, Indiana around five in the morning, a doughnut-shape exploded across radar like a firework.



  • The Fake Congressman Who Rallied Congress Into Action
    In 1999, Rep. Tony Schnell sponsored a bill that made everyone in America angry. The outcry grew so intense that Congress quickly passed a law that made sure Schnell's proposal would never become a reality. It's a beautiful parable of Congress listening to the people who elected them. Until you learn that Tony Schnell didn't exist.




  • The Transgender Crucible
    As a homeless trans teen, CeCe McDonald suffered a lifetime of hardships. But when she was charged with murder for simply defending herself, she became a folk hero.


  • The Great Forgetting
    Our first three years are usually a blur and we don’t remember much before age seven. What are we hiding from ourselves?




  • Why Can’t The Banking Industry Solve Its Ethics Problems?
    Some of the world’s leading bank regulators are trying to figure how scandal and ethical violations run rampant in the industry. And they have taken to sounding like parents who have grown increasingly exasperated at teenage children who keep wrecking the family car.


  • The Hargrave Four
    They were the most talented line in amateur football history. They were all destined for NFL stardom. Then everything fell apart.




  • A Surgeon's POV Of A Complete Knee Replacement
    A lot like that cabinet you tried to make in wood shop, a knee replacement requires a ton of specialized cutting jigs (who knew?). Unlike wood shop, the cabinet isn't bleeding profusely.


  • The Problems With Reviving The Recently Dead
    Emerging technologies are allowing doctors to save patients who would have been a lost cause in the very recent past. But these technologies come at a cost. They may restore life, but whether it’s a life worth living is another matter.


  • Ranking All 205 Strong Bad Emails
    With news that Homestar Runner would be seeing more frequent updates later this year, we went back and rewatched every single Strong Bad Email. Some good news: All of the emails you remember — the ones that you can still quote — mostly hold up.


  • In Search Of The Next Andrew Wiggins
    In the world of basketball, playing for the varsity has become largely irrelevant. Teenagers hoping to earn scholarships to Kansas and Kentucky, or those dreaming of the NBA, all play for outfits that travel around the country, allowing the nation’s best prospects to compete head to head without the interference of geography or homework.


  • The Real Business Of Fake Hollywood Money
    Hollywood prop producers face a constant dilemma: the necessity to skirt the line between strict counterfeiting laws and producers’ demands for incredibly realistic money.



  • Why Songs Get Stuck In Your Head
    Due to the involuntary nature of songs getting stuck in people’s heads, it is notoriously difficult to study. As such, the exact mechanism in the brain that causes this phenomenon isn’t yet fully understood. At a higher level, some scientists see humanity’s ancient practice of passing down knowledge through song as a possible source for this tendency.


  • The Truth About Food Stamps
    Conservatives love to beat up on food stamps. It happened again last week, when Paul Ryan called overhauling the program and converting it into a “block grant.” How does the program actually work? Does it actually need reform? What would happen if conservatives got their way?


  • How The Great War Helped Create The Biggest Pandemic Of All Time
    It sounds like science fiction rather than science fact to hear that between 50 and 100 million people (3-6% of the world's population at the time) perished in less than 18 months' time — some victims gasping towards an oozing cyanotic death less than one day after their first symptoms became apparent.


  • Square Bets Big On Next-Gen Credit Card Tech
    Square first came to fame with a credit card reader you could plug into an iPhone jack. But next year, the company’s signature device will be on its way to obsolescence as the U.S. transitions to a new kind of credit card that verifies purchases with an embedded computer chip.


  • My Trip To NBA Scout School
    A writer enrolls in a two-day seminar during NBA summer league and learns you have to be absolutely, insanely in love with basketball to survive the rigors of life as a professional scout.


  • THIS IS US GETTING YOUR ATTENTION
    We watch a lot of videos. Like, way too many. Let us leave the good eggs in your inbox every day so you're never late to the content party. Because there's no party like a content party, right? Right?




  • Do Health Apps Need Government Oversight?
    What we're supposed to think about a whole lot of internet-based technology is that, generally, the days of experts are over. But there's another perspective about health apps and anti-expert culture in general.



  • He Wears A Medal Of Honor
    Sammy L. Davis didn’t just carry fellow soldiers to safety — he swam them across a river on an air mattress, despite serious wounds. Sammy refused medical attention and joined a howitzer crew, eventually beating back the estimated 1,500 Viet Cong that had surrounded the encampment and becoming one of 12 men who survived the assault.



  • A Trans Guy’s Experience As A Sex Worker
    While it’s relatively understood that many trans women do sex work, so far in my experience, I’m the only trans man I’ve heard of who has worked in the sex industry. I’d like to share my experiences as a male prostitute, with the hope that other trans people and sex workers can feel less alone and know there are people out there who share their experiences and place no judgment on them.


  • Desk Desk Evolution
    With the disappearance of the desktop computer and the downfall of the deskphone, could we be seeing the demise of the office desk?



  • Portraits Of College Grads Living At Home
    It used to be shameful to move back home after college — a sign of personal failure. Now, because of rising student debts and a sub-stellar economy, it’s a common reality. That doesn't make it any less weird for a liberated young adult to move back home and experience the childhood delights of family dinners and curfews all over again.


  • Is Putin About To Blink?
    As the Kremlin gets more nervous about American and European pressure it could also get more dangerous. When Putin gets defensive, he takes the offense.


  • The Five Strangest Rules In Baseball
    At 240 pages, Major League Baseball's rule book is dense, and it is only growing denser. Last winter alone, the league added three new rules and amended six others — and that doesn't even count the two rules it has amended since this season began.





  • Richard Dawkins Responds To Critics Of His Tweet About Date Rape
    Some people angrily failed to understand that it was a point of logic using a hypothetical quotation about rape. They thought it was an active judgment about which kind of rape was worse than which. Other people got the point of logic but attacked me, equally furiously, for choosing the emotionally loaded example of rape to illustrate it.



  • Are Wine Enthusiasts Destroying The Sommelier?
    Much like art in the ’80s where enthusiasts took classes, majored in the medium and yet never held a job in the actual profession, the attraction of wine enthusiasts to attain certification in order to prove their knowledge of wine to their peers is at an all-time high. Yet it seems to come with a fundamental misunderstanding of what it truly means to be a sommelier.



  • How MH17 Came Apart Over Ukraine
    Because Flight 17 fell in a war zone — across farm fields and homes near where pro-Russia separatists are fighting the Ukraine government — control of the wreckage has been chaotic, and the comparatively sanitized photos typically released by aviation safety officials have been replaced by thousands of images distributed across wire services and social media.


  • All 30 'Mario Kart 8' Characters, Reviewed
    I saw a therapist in college who once described love to me as “unconditional acceptance.” It was an inadequate but useful simplification. In the Nintendo realm, Mario is unconditional acceptance, defined by the things he won’t do: He’ll never judge you, and he’ll never get in your way.






  • Why Does Google Employ A Pro-Slavery Lunatic?
    In 2011, Justine Tunney was an anti-establishment organizer within Occupy Wall Street, exhorting class warfare on the sidewalk. Today, it appears that Tunney spends much of her day ranting and railing against the poor, advocating for the overthrow of American democracy, and not least notably, working at Google's New York branch.


  • "ExamSoft" Bar Exam Software Fails Law Grads
    New submitter BobandMax writes ExamSoft, the management platform software that handles digital bar exam submissions for multiple states, experienced a severe technical meltdown on Tuesday, leaving many graduates temporarily unable to complete the exams needed to practice law. The snafu also left bar associations from nearly 20 states with no choice but to extend their submission deadlines. It's not the first time, either: a classmate of mine had to re-do a state bar exam after an ExamSoft glitch on the first go-'round. Besides handling the uploading of completed exam questions, ExamSoft locks down the computer on which it runs, so Wikipedia is not an option.







  • Vint Cerf on Why Programmers Don't Join the ACM
    jfruh writes "The Association for Computing Machinery is a storied professional group for computer programmers, but its membership hasn't grown in recent years to keep pace with the industry. Vint Cerf, who recently concluded his term as ACM president, asked developers what was keeping them from signing up. Their answers: paywalled content, lack of information relevant to non-academics, and code that wasn't freely available."







  • Chinese Government Probes Microsoft For Breaches of Monopoly Law
    DroidJason1 writes The Chinese government is investigating Microsoft for possible breaches of anti-monopoly laws, following a series of surprise visits to Redmond's offices in cities across China on Monday. These surprise visits were part of China's ongoing investigation [warning: WSJ paywall], and were based on security complaints about Microsoft's Windows operating system and Office productivity suite. Results from an earlier inspection apparently were not enough to clear Microsoft of suspicion of anti-competitive behavior. Microsoft's alleged anti-monopoly behavior is a criminal matter, so if found guilty, the software giant could face steep fines as well as other sanctions.







  • Google, Linaro Develop Custom Android Edition For Project Ara
    rtoz writes with this excerpt from an IDG story about the creation of an Android fork made just for Google's modular cell-phone project : A special edition of Android had to be created for the unique customizable design of Project Ara, said George Grey, CEO of Linaro. ... Android can already plug and play SD cards. But Grey said additional OS functionality is needed for storage, cameras and other modules that are typically inside smartphones, but can now be externally added to Project Ara. A lot of work is also being done on UniPro transport drivers, which connect modules and components in Project Ara. UniPro protocol drivers in Android will function much like the USB protocol, where modules will be recognized based on different driver "classes," such as those for networking, sensor, imaging, input and others. Some attachable parts may not be recognized by Android. For those parts, separate drivers need to be developed by module makers through emulators. "That will be need to be done in a secure system so the device can't do damage to the system," Grey said. Project Ara is a very disruptive concept, and it turns around conventional thinking on how to build phones, Grey said.







  • SpaceShipTwo Flies Again
    schwit1 writes "The competition heats up: For the first time in six months SpaceShipTwo completed a test flight [Tuesday]." The article linked is from NBC, which also has a deal with Virgin Galactic to televise the first commercial flight. It is thus in their interest to promote the spacecraft and company. The following two sentences from the article however clearly confirm every rumor we have heard about the ship in the past year, that they needed to replace or completely refit the engine and that the resulting thrust might not be enough to get the ship to 100 kilometers or 62 miles: "In January, SpaceShipTwo blasted off for a powered test and sailed through a follow-up glide flight, but then it went into the shop for rocket refitting. It's expected to go through a series of glide flights and powered flights that eventually rise beyond the boundary of outer space (50 miles or 100 kilometers in altitude, depending on who's counting)." Hopefully this test flight indicates that they have installed the new engine and are now beginning flight tests with equipment that will actually get the ship into space.







  • Student Uses Oculus Rift and Kinect To Create Body Swap Illusion
    kkleiner writes Using an Oculus Rift virtual reality headset, Microsoft Kinect, a camera, and a handful of electrical stimulators, a London student's virtual reality system is showing users what it's like to swap bodies. Looking down, they see someone else's arms and legs; looking out, it's someone else's point of view; and when they move their limbs, the body they see does the same (those electrical stimulators mildly shock muscles to force a friend to mirror the user's movements). It's an imperfect system, but a fascinating example of the power of virtual reality. What else might we use VR systems for? Perhaps they'll prove useful in training or therapeutic situations? Or what about with robots, which would be easier to inhabit and control than another human? The virtual body swap may never fully catch on, but generally, virtual reality will likely prove useful for more than just gaming and entertainment.







  • Journalist Sues NSA For Keeping Keith Alexander's Financial History Secret
    Daniel_Stuckey writes Now the NSA has yet another dilemma on its hands: Investigative journalist Jason Leopold is suing the agency for denying him the release of financial disclosure statements attributable to its former director. According to a report by Bloomberg , prospective clients of Alexander's, namely large banks, will be billed $1 million a month for his cyber-consulting services. Recode.net quipped that for an extra million, Alexander would show them the back door (state-installed spyware mechanisms) that the NSA put in consumer routers.







  • Amazon's eBook Math
    An anonymous reader writes: Amazon has waged a constant battle with publishers over the price of ebooks. They've now publicly laid out their argument and the business math behind it. "We've quantified the price elasticity of e-books from repeated measurements across many titles. For every copy an e-book would sell at $14.99, it would sell 1.74 copies if priced at $9.99. So, for example, if customers would buy 100,000 copies of a particular e-book at $14.99, then customers would buy 174,000 copies of that same e-book at $9.99. Total revenue at $14.99 would be $1,499,000. Total revenue at $9.99 is $1,738,000." They argue that capping most ebooks at $9.99 would be better for everyone, with the money split out 35% to the author, 35% to the publisher, and 30% to Amazon. Author John Scalzi says Amazon's reasoning and assumptions are a bit suspect. He disagrees that "books are interchangeable units of entertainment, each equally as salable as the next, and that pricing is the only thing consumers react to." Scalzi also points out that Amazon asserts itself as the only revenue stream for authors, which is not remotely true. "Amazon's assumptions don't include, for example, that publishers and authors might have a legitimate reason for not wanting the gulf between eBook and physical hardcover pricing to be so large that brick and mortar retailers suffer, narrowing the number of venues into which books can sell. Killing off Amazon's competitors is good for Amazon; there's rather less of an argument that it's good for anyone else."







  • The Problems With Drug Testing
    gallifreyan99 writes: Every drug you take will have been tested on people before it—but that testing process is meant to be tightly controlled, for the safety of everyone involved. Two investigations document the questionable methods used in many studies, and the lack of oversight the FDA seems to have over the process. First, drugs are increasingly being tested on homeless, destitute and mentally ill people. Second, it turns out many human trials are being run by doctors who have had their licenses revoked for drug addiction, malpractice and worse.







  • Is the App Store Broken?
    A recent post by Instapaper's Marco Arment suggests that design flaws in Apple's App Store are harming the app ecosystem, and users are suffering because of it. "The dominance and prominence of 'top lists' stratifies the top 0.02% so far above everyone else that the entire ecosystem is encouraged to design for a theoretical top-list placement that, by definition, won’t happen to 99.98% of them." Arment notes that many good app developers are finding continued development to be unsustainable, while scammy apps are encouraged to flood the market. "As the economics get tighter, it becomes much harder to support the lavish treatment that developers have given apps in the past, such as full-time staffs, offices, pixel-perfect custom designs of every screen, frequent free updates, and completely different iPhone and iPad interfaces. Many will give up and leave for stable, better-paying jobs. (Many already have.)" Brent Simmons points out the indie developers have largely given up the dream of being able to support themselves through iOS development. Yoni Heisler argues that their plight is simply a consequence of ever-increasing competition within the industry, though he acknowledges that more app curation would be a good thing. What strategies could Apple (and the operators of other mobile application stories) do to keep app quality high?







  • Meet Apache Software Foundation VP Rich Bowen (Video)
    Apache is behind a huge percentage of the world's websites, and the Apache Software Foundation is the umbrella organization that provides licensing and stucture for open source projects ranging from the Apache Web server to Apache OpenOffice to small utilities that aren't household names but are often important to a surprising number of people and companies. Most of us never get to meet the people behind groups like the Apache Software Foundation -- except today we tag along with Tim Lord at OSCON and chat with Apache Software Foundation Executive Vice President Rich Bowen -- who is also Red Hat's OpenStack Community Liason. (Alternate Video Link) Update: 07/30 22:23 GMT by T : Note that Bowen formerly served as Slashdot sister site SourceForge's Community Manager, too.







  • More Quantum Strangeness: Particles Separated From Their Properties
    Dupple sends word of new quantum mechanical research in which a neutron is sent along a different path from one of its characteristics. First, a neutron beam is split into two parts in a neutron interferometer. Then the spins of the two beams are shifted into different directions: The upper neutron beam has a spin parallel to the neutrons’ trajectory, the spin of the lower beam points into the opposite direction. After the two beams have been recombined, only those neutrons are chosen which have a spin parallel to their direction of motion. All the others are just ignored. ... These neutrons, which are found to have a spin parallel to its direction of motion, must clearly have travelled along the upper path — only there do the neutrons have this spin state. This can be shown in the experiment. If the lower beam is sent through a filter which absorbs some of the neutrons, then the number of the neutrons with spin parallel to their trajectory stays the same. If the upper beam is sent through a filter, than the number of these neutrons is reduced. Things get tricky when the system is used to measure where the neutron spin is located: the spin can be slightly changed using a magnetic field. When the two beams are recombined appropriately, they can amplify or cancel each other. This is exactly what can be seen in the measurement, if the magnetic field is applied at the lower beam – but that is the path which the neutrons considered in the experiment are actually never supposed to take. A magnetic field applied to the upper beam, on the other hand, does not have any effect.







  • Jesse Jackson: Tech Diversity Is Next Civil Rights Step
    theodp writes: U.S. civil rights leader Rev. Jesse Jackson called on the Obama administration Monday to scrutinize the tech industry's lack of diversity. "There's no talent shortage. There's an opportunity shortage," Jackson said, calling Silicon Valley "far worse" than many others, such as car makers that have been pressured by unions. He said tech behemoths have largely escaped scrutiny by a public dazzled with their cutting-edge gadgets. Jackson spoke to press after meeting with Labor Secretary Tom Perez for a review of H-1B visas, arguing that data show Americans have the skills and should have first access to high-paying tech work. Jackson's Rainbow Push Coalition plans to file a freedom-of-information request next month with the EEOC to acquire employment data for companies that have not yet disclosed it publicly, which includes Amazon, Broadcom, Oracle, Qualcomm and Yelp. Unlike the Dept. of Labor, Jackson isn't buying Silicon Valley's argument that minority hiring statistics are trade secrets. Five years after Google's HR Chief would only reassure Congress the company had "a very strong internal Black Googler Network" and its CEO brushed off similar questions about its diversity numbers by saying "we're pretty happy with the way our recruiting work," Google — under pressure from Jackson — fessed up to having a tech workforce that's only 1% Black, apparently par for the course in Silicon Valley.







  • Raspberry Pi-Compatible Development Board Released
    kodiaktau writes: Hardkernel has released a new Raspberry Pi-compatible development board based on the Samsung Exynos SoC. The board is smaller than a typical Pi, keeping basic HDMI, USB and CSI interfaces. It also has a 26-pin expansion board with more GPIO available, though it lacks an Ethernet jack. Initial prices as estimated around $30. The article makes the interesting point that this and other devices are marketed as "Raspberry Pi-compatible." The Raspberry Pi Foundation may run into name retention issues (similar to the ones Arduino had) as related hardware piggybacks on its success.







  • Quiet Cooling With a Copper Foam Heatsink
    Zothecula writes: The Silent Power PC is claimed to be the first high-end PC able to ditch noisy electric fans in favor of fully passive cooling. In place of a conventional fan, the unit uses an open-air metal foam heatsink that boasts an enormous surface area thanks to the open-weave copper filaments of which it's composed. The Silent Power creators claim that the circulation of air through the foam is so efficient in dissipating heat that the exterior surface temperature never rises above 50 C (122 F) in normal use.







  • UK To Allow Driverless Cars By January
    rtoz sends this news from the BBC: The UK government has announced that driverless cars will be allowed on public roads starting in January next year. It also invited cities to compete to host one of three trials of the tech, which would start at the same time. In addition, ministers ordered a review of the UK's road regulations to provide appropriate guidelines. ... The debate now is whether to allow cars, like the prototype unveiled by Google in May, to abandon controls including a steering wheel and pedals and rely on the vehicle's computer. Or whether, instead, to allow the machine to drive, but insist a passenger be ready to wrest back control at a moment's notice.







  • Black Hat Researchers Actively Trying To Deanonymize Tor Users
    An anonymous reader writes: Last week, we discussed news that a presentation had been canceled for the upcoming Black Hat security conference that involved the Tor Project. The researchers involved hadn't made much of an effort to disclose the vulnerability, and the Tor Project was scrambling to implement a fix. Now, the project says it's likely these researchers were actively attacking Tor users and trying to deanonymize them. "On July 4 2014 we found a group of relays that we assume were trying to deanonymize users. They appear to have been targeting people who operate or access Tor hidden services. The attack involved modifying Tor protocol headers to do traffic confirmation attacks. ...We know the attack looked for users who fetched hidden service descriptors, but the attackers likely were not able to see any application-level traffic (e.g. what pages were loaded or even whether users visited the hidden service they looked up). The attack probably also tried to learn who published hidden service descriptors, which would allow the attackers to learn the location of that hidden service." They also provide a technical description of the attack, and the steps they're taking to block such attacks in the future.







  • Ask Slashdot: Is Running Mission-Critical Servers Without a Firewall Common?
    An anonymous reader writes: I do some contract work on the side, and am helping a client set up a new point-of-sale system. For the time being, it's pretty simple: selling products, keeping track of employee time, managing inventory and the like. However, it requires a small network because there are two clients, and one of the clients feeds off of a small SQL Express database from the first. During the setup, the vendor disabled the local firewall, and in a number of emails back and forth since (with me getting more and more aggravated) they went from suggesting that there's no need for a firewall, to outright telling me that's just how they do it and the contract dictates that's how we need to run it. This isn't a tremendous deal today, but with how things are going, odds are there will be e-Commerce worked into it, and probably credit card transactions... which worries the bejesus out of me. So my question to the Slashdot masses: is this common? In my admittedly limited networking experience, it's been drilled into my head fairly well that not running a firewall is lazy (if not simply negligent), and to open the appropriate ports and call it a day. However, I've seen forum posts here and there with people admitting they run their clients without firewalls, believing that the firewall on their incoming internet connection is good enough, and that their client security will pick up the pieces. I'm curious how many real professionals do this, or if the forum posts I'm seeing (along with the vendor in question) are just a bunch of clowns.







  • The Milky Way Is Much Less Massive Than Previous Thought
    schwit1 writes: New research by astronomers suggests that the Milky Way is about half as massive as previously estimated. It was thought to be roughly the same mass as Andromeda, weighing in at approximately 1.26 x 10^12 solar masses (PDF). This new research indicates its mass is around half the mass of Andromeda. "Galaxies in the Local Group are bound together by their collective gravity. As a result, while most galaxies, including those on the outskirts of the Local Group, are moving farther apart due to expansion, the galaxies in the Local Group are moving closer together because of gravity. For the first time, researchers were able to combine the available information about gravity and expansion to complete precise calculations of the masses of both the Milky Way and Andromeda. ... Andromeda had twice as much mass as the Milky Way, and in both galaxies 90 percent of the mass was made up of dark matter."







  • An Accidental Wikipedia Hoax
    Andreas Kolbe writes: The Daily Dot's EJ Dickson reports how she accidentally discovered that a hoax factoid she added over five years ago as a stoned sophomore to the Wikipedia article on "Amelia Bedelia, the protagonist of the eponymous children's book series about a 'literal-minded housekeeper' who misunderstands her employer's orders," had not just remained on Wikipedia all this time, but come to be cited by a Taiwanese English professor, in "innumerable blog posts and book reports", as well as a book on Jews and Jesus. It's a cautionary tale about the fundamental unreliability of Wikipedia. And as Wikipedia ages, more and more such stories are coming to light.







  • Nuclear Missile Command Drops Grades From Tests To Discourage Cheating
    An anonymous reader writes: Earlier this year, just over half of the military officers put in charge of U.S. nuclear launch facilities were implicated in an exam cheating scandal. The Air Force conducted regular exams to keep officers current on the protocols and skills required to operate some of the world's most dangerous weapons. But the way they graded the test caused problems. Anything below a 90% score was a fail, but the remaining 10% often dictated how a launch officer's career progressed. There might not be much functional difference between a 93% and a 95%, but the person scoring higher will get promoted disproportionately quicker. This inspired a ring of officers to cheat in order to meet the unrealistic expectations of the Air Force. Now, in an effort to clean up that Missile Wing, the Air Force is making the exams pass/fail. The officers still need to score 90% or higher (since it's important work with severe consequences for failure), but scores won't be recorded and used to compete for promotions anymore. The Air Force is also making an effort to replace or refurbish the aging equipment that runs these facilities.







  • Ford, GM Sued Over Vehicles' Ability To Rip CD Music To Hard Drive
    Lucas123 writes: The Alliance of Artists and Recording Companies is suing Ford and General Motors for millions of dollars over alleged copyrights infringement violations because their vehicles' CD players can rip music to infotainment center hard drives. The AARC claims in its filing (PDF) that the CD player's ability to copy music violates the Audio Home Recording Act of 1992. The Act protects against distributing digital audio recording devices whose primary purpose is to rip copyrighted material. For example, Ford's owner's manual explains, "Your mobile media navigation system has a Jukebox which allows you to save desired tracks or CDs to the hard drive for later access. The hard drive can store up to 10GB (164 hours; approximately 2,472 tracks) of music." The AARC wants $2,500 for each digital audio recording device installed in a vehicle, the amount it says should have been paid in royalties.







  • Comcast Confessions
    An anonymous reader writes: We heard a couple weeks ago about an incredibly pushy Comcast customer service representative who turned a quick cancellation into an ordeal you wouldn't wish on your enemies. To try and find out what could cause such behavior, The Verge reached out to Comcast employees, hoping a few of them would explain training practices and management directives. They got more than they bargained for — over 100 employees responded, and they painted a picture of a corporation overrun by the neverending quest for greater profit. From the article: 'These employees told us the same stories over and over again: customer service has been replaced by an obsession with sales, technicians are understaffed and tech support is poorly trained, and the massive company is hobbled by internal fragmentation. ... Brian Van Horn, a billing specialist who worked at Comcast for 10 years, says the sales pitch gradually got more aggressive. "They were starting off with, 'just ask," he says. "Then instead of 'just ask,' it was 'just ask again,' then 'engage the customer in a conversation,' then 'overcome their objections.'" He was even pressured to pitch new services to a customer who was 55 days late on her bill, he says.'







  • Reglue: Opening Up the World To Deserving Kids With Linux Computers
    jrepin writes: Today, a child without access to a computer (and the Internet) at home is at a disadvantage before he or she ever sets foot in a classroom. The unfortunate reality is that in an age where computer skills are no longer optional, far too many families don't possess the resources to have a computer at home. Linux Journal recently had the opportunity to talk with Ken Starks about his organization, Reglue (Recycled Electronics and Gnu/Linux Used for Education) and its efforts to bridge this digital divide.







  • Airbnb Partners With Cities For Disaster Preparedness
    An anonymous reader writes: Every time a city- or state-wide disaster strikes, services to help the victims slowly crop up over the following days and weeks. Sometimes they work well, sometimes they don't. Today, city officials in San Francisco and Portland announced a partnership with peer-to-peer lodging service Airbnb to work out some disaster-preparedness plans ahead of time. Airbnb will locate hosts in these cities who will commit to providing a place to stay for people who are displaced in a disaster, and then set up alerts and notifications to help people find these hosts during a crisis. The idea is that if wildfires or an earthquake forces thousands of people to evacuate their homes, they can easily be absorbed into an organized, distributed group of willing hosts, rather than being shunted to one area and forced to live in a school gymnasium or something similar.








  • Nice computers don’t need to go to the toilet, says Barclays
    Bad computers might ask if you are Sarah Connor
    Something for the Weekend, Sir? Ever been invited to a party only to discover they gave you the wrong address? This doesn’t happen to me often but then I’m not the sort of person whom people invite to parties. Anyway, this wasn’t a party, it was a user group meetup.…






  • Has Europe cut the UK adrift on data protection?
    EU reckons we've one foot out the door anyway
    Comment In 1805, William Pitt the Younger, on hearing of Napoleon's victory at the Battle of Austerlitz, is reported to have said: "Roll up that map (of Europe) – it will not be wanted these 10 years". Well I have attended two meetings which suggest that the European Union has already rolled up its Data Protection Map of Europe so it excludes the UK.…







  • Oracle: That BUG in our In-Memory Option will be fixed in October
    Don't worry, though ... it's probably (mostly) harmless
    After much back-and-forth on blogs, Twitter, and online forums, Oracle has admitted that there is a bug that can cause its new in-memory database option to be reported as being in use when it's not, although the actual risk it poses remains unclear.…


  • NASA boffin: RIDDLE of huge BULGE FOUND ON MOON is solved
    When life gives you lemons, well ...
    A detailed analysis of the shape of the Moon has shown that it isn't a sphere - but instead slightly lemon-shaped. This has now revealed important clues as to how the Earth's satellite body formed (and no, it still doesn't involve any cheese).…


  • VMware builds product executables on 50 Mac Minis
    And goes to the Genius Bar for support
    VMware runs a cluster of 50 Mac Minis and puts it to work preparing the executables and binaries that customers receive when they acquire the company's products.…


  • BitTorrent launches decentralised crypto-fied chat app
    Voice and text snuck onto freedom-loving nodes
    BitTorrent has joined the increasingly crowded post-Snowden market for anonymous online chat services with "Bleep", a decentralised voice and text communications platform.…


  • Korean vendor launches wearable RPi clone
    Smaller, cheaper and battery-powered pocket Pi
    Korean outfit Hardkernel has snuck out a Raspberry Pi-compatible board it says targets developers with an interest in the wearables and Internet of Things space.…


  • Multipath TCP speeds up the internet so much that security breaks
    Black Hat research says proposed protocol will bork network probes, flummox firewalls
    The burgeoning Multipath TCP (MPTCP) standard promises to speed up the internet but will also break security solutions including intrusion detection and data leak prevention, says security researcher Catherine Pearce.…








  • Yes, Australia's government SHOULD store comms metadata
    Not because it's a good idea but because it already operates the infrastructure and processes to do it well
    Australia's federal government should store metadata collected by the nation's Internet service providers (ISPs), because the government already operates suitable facilities in which to do so.…









  • Government's 'Google Review' copyright rules become law
    Welcome in a New Era ... of copyright litigation
    Analysis The dog-ends of the “Google Review” of copyright sailed through the Lords yesterday and will become law on 1 October – creating work for the courts and quite possible, legal headaches for the government.…




  • Shopping spree helps Arrow counter organic sales slump
    Revenues rally but only if you don't look closely
    Healthy organic sales growth has once again proved slippery for enterprise tech bellwether Arrow Inc to grasp, though demand for heavy duty software and hardware started to re-emerge.…




  • Don't Hammer Bob's backup biz: At least sales are up
    Profits are down at CommVault but it's still beating Wall St
    CommVault, the all-singing-and-dancing data management, enterprise backup and archive company, saw its revenues rise 14 per cent in its first fiscal 2015 quarter - but its profits fell by five per cent. Despite that, it still beat Wall Street's earnings estimates.…


  • iWallet: No BONKING PLEASE, we're Apple
    BLE-ding iPhones, not NFC bonkers, will drive trend - marketeers
    Apple's iWallet mobile money app could be the start of a more general trend that sees web giants such as Facebook pushing into the payment industry, according to online payment experts.…




  • Speak your brains on SIGNAL-FREE mobile comms firm here
    Is goTenna tech a goer? Time to grill CEO, CTO
    Live Chat Our previous article about goTenna, a new device which allows mobile phones to communicate without signal, stirred up a lot of interest from readers and fellow journalists. If you'd like to interrogate the technology and the product, here's your chance.…




  • Trying to sell your house? It'd better have KILLER mobile coverage
    More NB than transport links to next-gen buyers - study
    Young property buyers see mobile coverage as a more important when it comes to choosing a location – rating it as more important than proximity to schools and transport or local crime rates, says a report commissioned by mobile survey company RootMetrics.…


  • Apple and Samsung UNDER THREAT from local brands – study
    Mobe marketers don't get it, says, er, mobe marketing firm
    A recent study by Netbiscuits has seen growth in locally made devices. While Samsung and Apple dominate globally – LG and HTC get something of a look-in, which is more than Sony, Nokia or Motorola manage – there is an interesting underlying trend of consumers becoming patriotic in their buying habits.…



  • Firm issues soft denial against Iron Dome hack
    Confirmed 'Chinese hack' downgraded to 'alleged' intrusion
    An Israeli defence firm linked to Israel's Iron Dome missile defence platform has denied reports it was hacked by Chinese attackers who made off with information on the military technology.…



Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM