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  • Red Hat: 2014:1744-01: v8314-v8: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated v8314-v8 packages that fix multiple security issues are now available for Red Hat Software Collections 1. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Moderate security [More...]





  • Mandriva: 2014:212: wget
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated wget package fixes security vulnerability:Wget was susceptible to a symlink attack which could create arbitraryfiles, directories or symbolic links and set their permissions whenretrieving a directory recursively through FTP (CVE-2014-4877).[More...]


  • Mandriva: 2014:211: wpa_supplicant
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated wpa_supplicant packages fix security vulnerability:A vulnerability was found in the mechanism wpa_cli and hostapd_cli usefor executing action scripts. An unsanitized string received from aremote device can be passed to a system() call resulting in arbitrary[More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:1724-01: kernel: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated kernel packages that fix several security issues and bugs are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Important security [More...]




  • Mandriva: 2014:210: mariadb
    LinuxSecurity.com: Multiple vulnerabilities has been discovered and corrected in mariadb:Unspecified vulnerability in Oracle MySQL Server 5.5.39 and earlierand 5.6.20 and earlier allows remote authenticated users to affectavailability via vectors related to SERVER:INNODB DML FOREIGN KEYS[More...]



  • Detailed Report Shows How ISPs Are Making 'Business Choice' To Make Your Internet Connection Terrible
    A couple of years ago, we wrote about an effort by the big broadband players to push the FCC away from using M-Lab to measure basic network diagnostics on the internet. M-Lab is a very interesting project, focused on collecting a huge amount of data about internet performance, and making that data widely available. In the past, for example, we've highlighted an M-Lab project showing which ISPs were throttling BitTorrent.Now, M-Lab has released a new report, along with all of the data and a very nice tool to analyze it all, called the Internet Observatory, that looks at ISP interconnection and, most importantly, its impact on consumer internet performance.


  • CherryTree Review: The Rich Tree Notes Application
    CherryTree is a notes-taking application which organizes your notes into a hierarchical tree, has support for text formatting, and is written in GTK2/Python. Lately this application has got a lot of attention due to rich features and frequent updates. It also comes by default in distributions such as MakuluLinux MATE Edition.



  • Big IT vendors finally embrace cloud
    The cloud is suddenly all the rage among large IT vendors as they begin to recognize that their customers are venturing into the public cloud, and as they do they need new ways to manage a hybrid environment. Hence the great hybrid cloud epiphany of 2014.


  • Ubuntu & SUSE & CentOS, Oh My!
    It's Halloween week, and the big names in Linux are determined not to disappoint the trick-or-treaters. No less than three mainline distributions have released new versions this week, led by perennially-loved-and-hated crowd favourite Ubuntu.


  • Drupal Hack & WordPress Users
    Because of automatic upgrades at the point level, standalone WordPress users whose sites aren’t hosted by WordPress may be less likely to see an exact repeat of the current Drupal situation, but that doesn’t mean they can ignore security. Along with gee-whiz new whistles and bells, every WordPress upgrade will include new security fixes — and you definitely want to have them firmly in place.




  • Weapons of MaaS Deployment
    I've been researching OpenStack deployment methods lately and so when I got an email from Canonical inviting me to check out how they deploy OpenStack using their Metal as a Service (MaaS) software on their fantastic Orange Box demo platform I jumped at the opportunity.



  • COM Express Type 2 modules keep the legacy alive
    Adlink released two Linux-ready COM Express Type 2 modules running on Intel 4th Gen. Core and Intel Atom e3800 SoCs, respectively. The Express-HL2 was previewed by Adlink with minimal details back in June 2013, shortly after Intel announced its 4th Generation Core (“Haswell”) processors.


  • Red Hat delivers latest developer tools
    Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 is still new, but there are even newer programming tools. Fortunately, with the latest Version of Red Hat Software Collection, programmers can keep up to speed.


  • Advisory says to assume all Drupal 7 websites are compromised
    If your organization uses Drupal, you might have a serious problem on your hands. On October 15, Drupal urged users to apply an update that fixed a SQL Injection flaw. However, unless that patch was installed within seven hours, Drupal now says it's best to assume the website was completely compromised.


  • Parallels CTO: Linux container security is not the problem
    Security Projects Containerization technology has been a game-changer, powering Docker and other transformative software solutions. It's also garnered its share of criticisms about performance, security, and resiliency. But one of the creators of Parallels, a key containerization technology on Linux, is pushing back against what he feels are pervasive myths about containers -- many of which, he argues, are rooted in misunderstandings of how to use them and what they're for.


  • Has the time come to rebrand open source?
    OK, take a deep breath and don't panic! I assure you that I'm not asking you to do anything that you have not already done before. Let me explain myself before I go any further. I'm the CEO of a web design agency in Malmö, Sweden that specializes in web publishing and digital presence. We create websites using TYPO3 which is a web Content Management Solution.




  • Pirate Bay founder guilty in historic hacker case
    Pirate Bay founder Gottrid Svartholm Warg and his 21-year-old Danish co-defendant JLT have been found guilty by a Danish court of mounting the most serious computer hack in the country’s history. The court said that the unauthorised access to CSC’s mainframe was of a “systematic and organised character”, dismissing the Swede’s claims that his computer was used by others to carry out the hack as “unlikely”.


  • Things I Do in Windows When I Forget It's Not Linux
    Many Linux users out there dual-boot with a Windows system, or they just use the two operating systems separately. An interesting thing happens when you're in Windows and you try to do something that you think is normal, but that feature doesn't exist.


  • Iron Man costume made on the shoulders of giants
    When Iron Man set foot on stage at the Red Hat Halloween party last year, my jaw dropped. A huge applause erupted. It was like the real Iron Man stepped out of the Hollywood big screen and was right in front of us. I was waiting for it to start flying.


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  • Launch Failure Doesn't Shake NASA's Faith In Orbital's Antares Rocket
    Orbital Sciences said its unmanned Antares rocket suffered a “catastrophic anomaly” less than 20 seconds after launching from NASA’s Wallops Island (Va.) launch center on Tuesday evening. Within seconds after launch, an unusual flare appeared near the bottom of the rocket. Less than 10 seconds later, the launch safety officer sent a command for the rocket to self-destruct.






  • The Truth About Witches
    Katherine Howe is a New York Times bestselling author who recently edited "The Penguin Book of Witches," a primary-source reader about witches and witch-hunting ranging from the medieval period into the early eighteenth century.


  • My Week With A Flip Phone
    Lately the flip has been discussed as a sort of “status phone” among cool people, like pretentious technophobes and Anna Wintour, so I’m wondering if my newly acquired flip phone will provide me entry to this club.


  • Gamergate Is Dead
    It's time for Gamergate's remaining supporters to rethink the purpose of the movement.



  • I Can Never Have Too Many Mechanical Pencils
    I must have a mechanical pencil, the kind you click to advance the lead. And when I say “a mechanical pencil,” you should know that I mean “lots of mechanical pencils.”



  • The Music Industry Is Flatlining, But Music Apps Are Bigger Than Ever
    Between 1999 and 2009, U.S. music industry revenues were cut in half, thanks to the demise of overpriced CDs, the advent of cheap, song-by-song downloads, and piracy. Since that time, the bleeding has stopped, but the industry has yet to bounce back to its heady late-90s heights.



  • The Present And Future Of Found-Footage Horror
    It’s been 15 years since the release of "The Blair Witch Project", but the phrase “'Blair Witch' rip-off” keeps growing more prevalent, partly due to the changing economics and tools of filmmaking, and partly due to left-field hits like "Paranormal Activity."




  • The Ikea Sit/Stand Desk, Reviewed
    Standing desks are not cheap. Or at least, the extremely handy motorized ones aren't. That's why everyone — including this desk-agnostic blogger — freaked out when IKEA announced that it would sell a sit/stand desk powered by electricity for less than $500. Finally, a healthy desk option for the masses. Finally!




  • How To Buy Food
    Sometimes it seems less like you’re going out to buy milk and bread than you’re buffeted by endless marketing, too many choices, and not enough information. Does the perky green label mean that this box of cereal is good for me? Are there certain expiration dates that are less important than others?





  • FiveThirtyEight’s Senate Forecast
    FiveThirtyEight’s election forecasting model combines hundreds of opinion polls with historical and demographic information to calculate odds for each Senate race. They estimate the probability that each party will win control of the Senate by running those odds through thousands of simulations.


  • The Painting Hidden From Hitler In Case It Gave Him Magic Powers
    One of the world's most famous self-portraits is going on rare public display in the northern Italian city of Turin. Very little is known about the 500-year-old, fragile, fading red chalk drawing of Leonardo da Vinci but some believe it has mystical powers.


  • The End Of The Key
    Since the Pharaohs, people have been using keys to lock things up. The metal key has proved remarkably resilient, but as electronic locking devices become ever-more popular, are the days of the humble key numbered?





  • The 10 Greatest Changes Of The Past 1,000 Years
    In Europe, the last millennium has been shaped by successive waves of change, but which shifts, in which centuries, have really shaped the modern world? Historian Ian Mortimer identifies the 10 leading drivers of change.


  • How To Ask For A Good Haircut
    Barbers have their own language for how to cut and style your hair, and by not knowing these terms you're sentencing yourself to a lifetime of mediocre haircuts. Just remember, "a little off the top" is the death of all good trims.



  • Ford Develops A 'Black Box' For Cop Cars
    The long arm of analytics is coming to law enforcement. Ford has announced a new technology co-developed with Telogis that will monitor the driving behavior of police officers. In fact the little black box will be like a humorless traffic cop in every patrol car.


  • I Went To A Completely Sober, Early Morning Rave
    I am about to go to a rave that starts at 6:30 am and lasts until 10:30 am. No drinks are allowed. No drugs are allowed. It’s a ritual intended to wake you up and start your day happily. A swap-out for the mechanized wake-and-work routine most of us find ourselves merry-go-rounding on at a daily lurch.





  • The U.S. Navy In Gorgeous Photos
    The U.S. Navy employs some incredibly talented aviators and sailors. They also employ some of the best photographers around to capture the day-to-day experience of the projection of American military might across the globe.








  • The 100 Most-Cited Papers Of All Time
    The exercise revealed some surprises, not least that it takes a staggering 12,119 citations to rank in the top 100 — and that many of the world’s most famous papers do not make the cut.




  • Why NASA Blew Up A Rocket Just After Launch
    Every time NASA launches a rocket, two safety officers have one weighty decision: They have to decide whether to push a self-destruct button if it appears the launch is going awry.


  • A Shooting On Spring Grove Avenue
    When Michael Burnside was found dead in his Dallas home four years ago, Detective Dwayne Thompson decided that the victim's girlfriend, Olivia Lord, had pulled the trigger. But as the case made its way through the courts, she maintained her innocence — and claimed Thompson was the one who should go to prison.






  • Why Are Victorian Houses So Creepy?
    Americans have a very specific idea about what makes a house look creepy. If you search for "haunted house" on Google images, only one type of architecture appears in the first 25 images: a Victorian mansion.




  • Mark Zuckerberg And John Doerr Donate $1M To Expand The Hour Of Code Campaign
    theodp writes Techcrunch reports that Mark Zuckerberg has donated $500K to expand the Hour of Code campaign, which aims to reach 100 million students this year with its learn-to-code tutorials, including its top-featured tutorial starring Zuckerberg (video). Techcrunch adds that Zuckerberg's donation will be matched by fellow tutorial team teacher Bill Gates (video), Microsoft, Reid Hoffman, Salesforce, Google, and others. Zuck and Gates appear to have a sizable captive audience — a Code.org District Partnership Model brochure on the code-or-no-HS-diploma-for-you Chicago Public Schools' website calls for partner districts to "hold a district-wide Hour of Code event each year" for three years.







  • Denmark Plans To Be Coal-Free In 10 Years
    merbs writes "Earlier this year, Denmark's leadership announced that the nation would run entirely on renewable power by 2050. Wind, solar, and biomass would be ramped up while coal and gas are phased out. Now Denmark has gone even further, and plans to end coal by 2025.







  • France Investigating Mysterious Drone Activity Over 7 Nuclear Power Plant Sites
    thygate writes In France, an investigation has been launched into the appearance of "drones" on 7 different nuclear power plant sites across the country in the last month. Some of the plants involved are Creys-Malville en Bugey in the southeast, Blayais in the southwest, Cattenom en Chooz in the northeast, Gravelines in the north, and Nogent-sur-Seine, close to Paris. It is forbidden to fly over these sites on altitudes less than 1 km in a 5 km radius. According to a spokesman of the state electric company that runs the facilities (EDF), there was no danger to the security and production of the plants. However these incidents will likely bring nuclear safety concerns back into the spotlight.







  • Researchers Claim Metal "Patch" Found On Pacific Island Is From Amelia Earhart
    An anonymous reader writes Amelia Earhart disappeared in 1937, but scientists may have now uncovered where she ended up. Researchers have identified a piece of aluminum, which washed up on a remote Pacific island, as dated to the correct time period and consistent with the design of Earhart's Lockheed Electra. From the article: "The warped piece of metal was uncovered on a 1991 voyage to the island of Nikumaroro in the Republic of Kiribati by The International Group for Historic Aircraft Recovery (TIGHAR), which has spent millions of dollars searching for Earhart's plane in a project that has involved hundreds of people. 'We don't understand how that patch got busted out of (the plane) and ended up on the island where we found it, but we have the patch, we have a piece of Earhart's aircraft,' TIGHAR executive director Ric Gillespie said."







  • New Study Shows Three Abrupt Pulses of CO2 During Last Deglaciation
    vinces99 writes A new study shows that the increase of atmospheric carbon dioxide that contributed to the end of the last ice age more than 10,000 years ago did not occur gradually but rather was characterized by three abrupt pulses. Scientists are not sure what caused these abrupt increases, during which carbon dioxide levels rose about 10 to 15 parts per million – or about 5 percent per episode – during a span of one to two centuries. It likely was a combination of factors, they say, including ocean circulation, changing wind patterns and terrestrial processes. The finding, published Oct. 30 in the journal Nature, casts new light on the mechanisms that take the Earth in and out of ice ages. "We used to think that naturally occurring changes in carbon dioxide took place relatively slowly over the 10,000 years it took to move out of the last ice age," said lead author Shaun Marcott, who did the work as a postdoctoral researcher at Oregon State University and is now at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. "This abrupt, centennial-scale variability of CO2 appears to be a fundamental part of the global carbon cycle." Previous research has hinted at the possibility that spikes in atmospheric carbon dioxide may have accelerated the last deglaciation, but that hypothesis had not been resolved, the researchers say. The key to the new finding is the analysis of an ice core from the West Antarctic that provided the scientists with an unprecedented glimpse into the past."







  • Google To Disable Fallback To SSL 3.0 In Chrome 39 and Remove In Chrome 40
    An anonymous reader writes Google today announced plans to disable fallback to version 3 of the SSL protocol in Chrome 39, and remove SSL 3.0 completely in Chrome 40. The decision follows the company's disclosure of a serious security vulnerability in SSL 3.0 on October 14, the attack for which it dubbed Padding Oracle On Downgraded Legacy Encryption (POODLE). Following Mozilla's decision on the same day to disable SSL 3.0 by default in Firefox 34, which will be released on November 25, Google has laid out its plans for Chrome. This was expected, given that Google Security Team's Bodo Möller stated at the time: "In the coming months, we hope to remove support for SSL 3.0 completely from our client products."







  • Charity Promotes Covert Surveillance App For Suicide Prevention
    VoiceOfDoom writes Major UK charity The Samaritans have launched an app titled "Samaritans Radar", in an attempt to help Twitter users identify when their friends are in crisis and in need of support. Unfortunately the privacy implications appear not to have been thought through — installing the app allows it to monitor the Twitter feeds of all of your followers, searching for particular phrases or words which might indicate they are in distress. The app then sends you an email suggesting you contact your follower to offer your help. Opportunities for misuse by online harassers are at the forefront of the concerns that have been raised, in addition; there is strong evidence to suggest that this use of personal information is illegal, being in contravention of UK Data Protection law.







  • Vulnerabilities Found (and Sought) In More Command-Line Tools
    itwbennett writes The critical Shellshock vulnerabilities found last month in the Bash Unix shell have motivated security researchers to search for similar flaws in old, but widely used, command-line utilities. Two remote command execution vulnerabilities were patched this week in the popular wget download agent and tnftp client for Unix-like systems [also mentioned here]. This comes after a remote code execution vulnerability was found last week in a library used by strings, objdump, readelf and other command-line tools.







  • Getting 'Showdown' To 90 FPS In UE4 On Oculus Rift
    An anonymous reader writes Oculus has repeatedly tapped Epic Games to whip up demos to show off new iterations of Oculus Rift VR headset hardware. The latest demo, built in UE4, is 'Showdown', an action-packed scene of slow motion explosions, bullets, and debris. The challenge? Oculus asked Epic to make it run at 90 FPS to match the 90 Hz refresh rate of the latest Oculus Rift 'Crescent Bay' prototype. At the Oculus Connect conference, two of the developers from the team that created the demo share the tricks and tools they used to hit that target on a single GPU.







  • Signed-In Maps Mean More Location Data For Google
    mikejuk writes The announcement on the Google Geo Developers blog has the catchy title No map is an island. It points out that while there are now around 2 million active sites that have Google Maps embedded, they store data independently, The new feature, called attributed save, aims to overcome this problem by creating an integrated experience between the apps you use that have map content and Google Maps, and all it requires is that users sign in. So if you use a map in a specific app you will be able to see locations you entered in other apps.This all sounds great and it makes sense to allow users to take all of the locations that have previously been stored in app silos and put them all together into one big map data pool. The only down side is that the pool is owned by Google and some users might not like the idea of letting Google have access to so much personal geo information. It seems you can have convenience or you can have privacy. It might just be that many users prefer their maps to be islands.







  • Pirate Bay Founder Gottfrid Warg Faces Danish Jail Time
    Hammeh writes BBC news reports that Pirate Bay co-founder Gottfrid Warg has been found guilty of hacking into computers and illegally downloading files in Denmark. Found guilty of breaching security to access computers owned by technology giant CSC to steal police and social security files, Mr Warg faces a sentence of up to six years behind bars. Mr Warg argued that although the computer used to commit the offence was owned by him, the hacks were carried out by another individual who he declined to name.







  • First Detailed Data Analysis Shows Exactly How Comcast Jammed Netflix
    An anonymous reader writes John Oliver calls it "cable company f*ckery" and we've all suspected it happens. Now on Steven Levy's new Backchannel publication on Medium, Susan Crawford delivers decisive proof, expertly dissecting the Comcast-Netflix network congestion controversy. Her source material is a detailed traffic measurement report (.pdf) released this week by Google-backed M-Lab — the first of its kind — showing severe degradation of service at interconnection points between Comcast, Verizon and other monopoly "eyeball networks" and "transit networks" such as Cogent, which was contracted by Netflix to deliver its bits. The report shows that interconnection points give monopoly ISPs all the leverage they need to discriminate against companies like Netflix, which compete with them in video services, simply by refusing to relieve network congestion caused by external traffic requested by their very own ISP customers. And the effects victimize not only companies targeted but ALL incoming traffic from the affected transit network. The report proves the problem is not technical, but rather a result of business decisions. This is not technically a Net neutrality problem, but it creates the very same headaches for consumers, and unfair business advantages for ISPs. In an accompanying article, Crawford makes a compelling case for FCC intervention.







  • How Apple Watch Is Really a Regression In Watchmaking
    Nerval's Lobster writes Apple design chief Jony Ive has spent the past several weeks talking up how the Apple Watch is an evolution on many of the principles that guided the evolution of timepieces over the past several hundred years. But the need to recharge the device on a nightly basis, now confirmed by Apple CEO Tim Cook, is a throwback to ye olden days, when a lady or gentleman needed to keep winding her or his pocket-watch in order to keep it running. Watch batteries were supposed to bring "winding" to a decisive end, except for that subset of people who insist on carrying around a mechanical timepiece. But with Apple Watch's requirement that the user constantly monitor its energy, what's old is new again. Will millions of people really want to charge and fuss with their watch at least once a day?







  • A Mixed Review For CBS's "All Access" Online Video Streaming
    lpress writes I tested CBS All Access video streaming. It has technical problems, which will be resolved, but I will still pass because they show commercials in addition to a $5.99 per month fee. Eventually, we will all cut the cord and have a choice of viewing modes — on-demand versus scheduled and with and without commercials — but don't expect your monthly bill to drop as long as our ISPs are monopolies or oligopolies.







  • Tim Cook: "I'm Proud To Be Gay"
    An anonymous reader writes Apple CEO Tim Cook has publicly come out as gay. While he never hid his sexuality from friends, family, and close co-workers, Cook decided it was time to make it publicly known in the hopes that the information will help others who don't feel comfortable to do so. He said, "I don't consider myself an activist, but I realize how much I've benefited from the sacrifice of others. So if hearing that the CEO of Apple is gay can help someone struggling to come to terms with who he or she is, or bring comfort to anyone who feels alone, or inspire people to insist on their equality, then it's worth the trade-off with my own privacy." Cook added that while the U.S. has made progress in recent years toward marriage equality, there is still work to be done. "[T]here are laws on the books in a majority of states that allow employers to fire people based solely on their sexual orientation. There are many places where landlords can evict tenants for being gay, or where we can be barred from visiting sick partners and sharing in their legacies. Countless people, particularly kids, face fear and abuse every day because of their sexual orientation."







  • Slashdot Asks: Appropriate Place For Free / Open Source Software Artifacts?
    A friend of mine who buys and sells used books, movies, etc. recently purchased a box full of software on CD, including quite a few old Linux distributions, and asked me if I'd like them. The truth is, I would like them, but I've already collected over the last two decades more than I should in the way of Linux distributions, on at least four kinds of media (starting with floppies made from a CD that accompanied a fat book on how to install some distribution or other -- very useful in the days of dialup). I've got some boxes (Debian Potato, and a few versions of Red Hat and Mandrake Linux), and an assortment of marketing knickknacks, T-shirts, posters, and books. I like these physical artifacts, and they're not dominating my life, but I'd prefer to actually give many of them to someplace where they'll be curated. (Or, if they should be tossed, tossed intelligently.) Can anyone point to a public collection of some kind that gathers physical objects associated with Free software and Open Source, and makes them available for others to examine? (I plan to give some hardware, like a pair of OLPC XO laptops, to the same Goodwill computer museum highlighted in this video, but they probably don't want an IBM-branded radio in the shape of a penguin.)







  • Hacking Team Manuals: Sobering Reminder That Privacy is Elusive
    Advocatus Diaboli writes with a selection from The Intercept describing instructions for commercial spyware sold by Italian security firm Hacking Team. The manuals describe Hacking Team's software for government technicians and analysts, showing how it can activate cameras, exfiltrate emails, record Skype calls, log typing, and collect passwords on targeted devices. They also catalog a range of pre-bottled techniques for infecting those devices using wifi networks, USB sticks, streaming video, and email attachments to deliver viral installers. With a few clicks of a mouse, even a lightly trained technician can build a software agent that can infect and monitor a device, then upload captured data at unobtrusive times using a stealthy network of proxy servers, all without leaving a trace. That, at least, is what Hacking Team's manuals claim as the company tries to distinguish its offerings in the global marketplace for government hacking software. (Here are the manuals themselves.)







  • Cutting the Cord? Time Warner Loses 184,000 TV Subscribers In One Quarter
    Mr D from 63 (3395377) writes Time Warner Cable's results have been buoyed recently by higher subscriber numbers for broadband Internet service. In the latest period, however, Time Warner Cable lost 184,000 overall residential customer relationships [Note: non-paywalled coverage at Bloomberg and Reuters]. The addition of 92,000 residential high-speed data customers was offset by 184,000 fewer residential video customers in the quarter. Triple play customers fell by 24,000, while residential voice additions were 14,000.







  • Drupal Warns Users of Mass, Automated Attacks On Critical Flaw
    Trailrunner7 writes The maintainers of the Drupal content management system are warning users that any site owners who haven't patched a critical vulnerability in Drupal Core disclosed earlier this month should consider their sites to be compromised. The vulnerability, which became public on Oct. 15, is a SQL injection flaw in a Drupal module that's designed specifically to help prevent SQL injection attacks. Shortly after the disclosure of the vulnerability, attackers began exploiting it using automated attacks. One of the factors that makes this vulnerability so problematic is that it allows an attacker to compromise a target site without needing an account and there may be no trace of the attack afterward.







  • Lenovo Completes Motorola Deal
    SmartAboutThings writes If somehow you missed the reports of Lenovo buying Motorola – which was also bought by Google for $12.5 billion back in 2011 – then you should know that the deal is now complete. Lenovo has announced today that Motorola is now a Lenovo company — which makes Lenovo not only the number one PC maker in the world but also the third-largest smartphone maker.







  • New Crash Test Dummies Reflect Rising American Bodyweight
    Ever thought that all those crash-test dummies getting slammed around in slow-motion were reflecting an unrealistic, hard-to-achieve body image? One company is acting to change that, with some super-sized (or right-sized) dummies more in line with current American body shapes: Plymouth, Michigan-based company Humanetics said that it has been manufacturing overweight crash test dummies to reflect growing obesity trends in the U.S. Humanetics has been the pioneer in crash test dummies segment since the 1950s. But now, the company's crash test dummies are undergoing a makeover, which will represent thicker waistlines and large rear ends of Americans.







  • Australian Gov't Tries To Force Telcos To Store User Metadata For 2 Years
    AlbanX writes The Australian Government has introduced a bill that would require telecommunications carriers and service providers to retain the non-content data of Australian citizens for two years so it can be accessed — without a warrant- by local law enforcement agencies. Despite tabling the draft legislation into parliament, the bill doesn't actually specify the types of data the Government wants retained. The proposal has received a huge amount of criticism from the telco industry, other members of parliament and privacy groups. (The Sydney Morning Herald has some audio of discussion about the law.)







  • Ebola Forecast: Scientists Release Updated Projections and Tracking Maps
    An anonymous reader writes Scientists of the Northeastern University, in collaboration with European scientists, developed a modeling approach aimed at assessing the progression of the Ebola epidemic in West Africa and its international spread under the assumption that the outbreak continues to evolve at the current pace. They also considered the impact of travel restrictions, and concluded that such restrictions may delay by only a few weeks the risk that the outbreak extends to new countries. Instead, travel bans could hamper the delivery of medical supplies and the deployment of specialized personnel to manage the epidemic. In the group's page, there's also an updated assessment of the probability of Ebola virus disease case importation in countries across the world, which was also invoked during the Congressional Ebola debate. The group also released a map with real-time tracking of conversations about Ebola on Twitter. Policy makers and first responders are the main target audience of the tool, which is able to show a series of potential warnings and events (mostly unconfirmed) related to Ebola spreading and case importation.







  • MIT Professor Advocates Ending Asteroid Redirect Mission To Fund Asteroid Survey
    MarkWhittington writes Professor Richard Binzel published a commentary in the journal Nature that called for two things. He proposed that NASA cancel the Asteroid Redirect Mission currently planned for the early 2020s. Instead, he would like the asteroid survey mandated by the George E. Brown, Jr. Near-Earth Object Survey Act of 2005, part of the 2005 NASA Authorization Act, funded at $200 million a year. Currently NASA funds the survey at $20 million a year, considered inadequate to complete the identification of 90 percent of hazardous near-Earth objects 140 meters or greater by 2020 as mandated by the law.







  • Labor Department To Destroy H-1B Records
    Presto Vivace writes H-1B records that are critical to research and take up a small amount of storage are set for deletion. "In a notice posted last week, the U.S. Department of Labor said that records used for labor certification, whether in paper or electronic, 'are temporary records and subject to destruction' after five years, under a new policy. There was no explanation for the change, and it is perplexing to researchers. The records under threat are called Labor Condition Applications (LCA), which identify the H-1B employer, worksite, the prevailing wage, and the wage paid to the worker. The cost of storage can't be an issue for the government's $80 billion IT budget: A full year's worth of LCA data is less than 1GB."







  • Facebook says vendor secrets forced it to homebrew switches
    Director of technical ops spills how switch vendors keep diagnostic tricks to themselves
    It's four months since Facebook first launched its Wedge switch and accompanying FBOSS operating system. Some forms of Wedge are biw in production and others are in testing, so El Reg decided to talk with Facebook's director of technical operations, Najam Ahmad, to see where The Social Network is at with its software-defined networking (SDN) efforts.…






  • FIFTEEN whole dollars on offer for cranky Pentium 4 buyers
    Miracle of US legal system delivers almost-resolution to long-running class action
    Intel will fork over fifteen whole American dollars to folks who feel that it and HP misrepresented the performance of Pentium 4 CPUs released way back in the year 2000.…







  • Danish court finds Pirate Bay cofounder guilty of hacking CSC servers
    Jury doesn't buy 'evil hackers pwned my computer' defense
    Gottfrid Svartholm Warg, cofounder of the Pirate Bay, has been found guilty of hacking charges by a court in Denmark, which ruled that he and a 21-year-old accomplice had hacked US technology company CSC to gain access to Danish government servers.…






  • EE launches 150Mbps '4G+' in Central London
    LTE-A - Faster phones for Hoxton Hipsters
    Mobile network EE has announced that higher speed LTE-A is now available in select areas. This will give speeds of up to 150Mbps.…


  • BT: Consumers and cost cutting save the day
    Telco adds 88,000 broadband users, sees £4.38bn in sales
    Cost cutting and 88,000 new broadband punters helped BT bank more profits in calendar Q3, although revenues went in the opposite direction as all divisions outside of the consumer wing reported declining fortunes.…








  • Apple dealer CANCOM: We're RAKING IT IN
    EBITDA doubles year-on-year at the German firm
    Apple dealer CANCOM has announced whopping third-quarter results, way in excess of the same period last year, citing that old favourite "solid business demand".…




  • Ex-Soviet engines fingered after Antares ROCKET launch BLAST
    Speculation rife, but Orbital claims it's too early to tell
    Speculation is rife that the Antares rocket accident at Wallops on Tuesday evening was caused by the 1960s-era Russian engines powering the craft, though the official investigations have only just begun.…



  • Making an entrance: Remote door-opening tech
    Personal portal peace of mind
    Breaking Fad For a lot of Reg readers, home automation is probably an internal affair – that is, if you're using technology, it's probably to control things inside the home, like heating, lighting and so on. And indeed, that also makes up the bulk of what's available when it comes to the major suppliers.…



  • Samsung's flagging phone fortunes hit profits hard
    Net earnings nearly halve in the third quarter compared to last year
    Samsung has promised to shake up its smartphone line-up to try to win back some of the ground it has lost in the sector, after it revealed that its third-quarter operating profit was the lowest in more than three years.…




  • UK consumers particularly prone to piss-poor patching
    Java a hot spot – new report
    UK consumer patching practices have worsened still further over the last three months, increasing the threat of malware problems, according to a new study by IT security provider Secunia.…


  • All change at the top of HP's enterprise biz
    Same strategy, but can the newbies make it work?
    A change at the top of HP’s enterprise distie team across both European and UK ops may well help solve the disconnect that occurred when a regionally drafted strategy was executed locally.…


  • SkyHawk array swoops down, 136TB claws extended
    Skyera offering more capacity, less power usage
    All-flash array startup and packing density expert Skyera has got itself a new version of its skyHawk array, encompassing a threefold increase in capacity.…






  • Humanity now making about 41 mobes EACH SECOND
    327 MEEELLION mobes shipped in Q3, say very tired analysts
    The world is now manufacturing just under 42 mobile phones a second thanks to an uptick in global production, IDC's presumably-very-tired handset-counters say.…



  • Amazon's hybrid cloud: EC2 wrangled by Microsoft's control freak
    Plug-in for System Centre gives Windows Server control of Bezos' bit barns
    Hybrid clouds are the new black: world+dog has decided that some workloads just won't ever ascend into the elastosphere, but that running a private and public cloud from separate control freaks is a dumb idea.…


  • NASA: Spacecraft crash site FOUND ON MOON RIM
    'What fun!' exlaims NASA boffin who found the LADEE
    NASA boffins are chuffed as ninepence this week to announce that they have discovered unmistakable signs of a crashed spacecraft far away from the Apollo landing sites on the far side of the Moon.…


  • Remember Internet2? It's now a software-defined metacloud
    Boffins can slice network into their own private connections for research and fun
    America's Internet2 research network is embracing the cloud, launching an SDN implementation designed to let academics create their own private clouds.…


  • Carders offer malware with the human touch to defeat fraud detection
    Huge credit card heists mean crims want to cash out - fast
    A new cybercrime tool promises to use credit card numbers in a more human way that is less likely to attract the attention of fraud-detection systems, and therefore be more lucrative for those who seek to profit from events like the Target breach.…


  • Mozilla releases geolocating WiFi sniffer for Android
    As if the civilians who never change access point passwords will ever opt out of this one
    Mozilla has released a new app, Stumbler, that “collects GPS data for our location service” by detecting WiFi access points and mobile phone cells towers, then “uses these wireless network locations to provide geolocation services for Firefox OS devices and other open source projects.”…


  • Twitter, IBM, in deal to create brainy Big Blue Bird
    #Enterprise #BigData #Analytics #BuzzwordFest
    IBM and Twitter have assembled their buzzwords, ranked them into a regiment, and jointly set them loose to march upon a waiting world, by announcing that the avian network will feed data galore to Big Blue's cloudy enterprise big data analytics offerings.…


  • Drupalocalypse! Devs say it's best to assume your CMS is owned
    SQLi hole was hit hard, fast, and before most admins even knew it needed patching
    Drupal websites that had not patched seven hours after the disclosure on a 'highly critical' SQL injection (SQLi) hole disclosed 15 October are hosed, the content management tool's developers say.…


Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM