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  • Red Hat: 2014:1083-01: kernel-rt: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated kernel-rt packages that fix multiple security issues and one bug are now available for Red Hat Enterprise MRG 2.5. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Important security [More...]



  • Red Hat: 2014:1078-01: openstack-neutron: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated openstack-neutron packages that fix one security issue are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 4.0. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Moderate security [More...]



  • Red Hat: 2014:1075-01: qemu-kvm: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated qemu-kvm packages that fix two security issues and three bugs are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Moderate security [More...]









  • LaKademy 2014 - KDE Latin America Summit
    Two years have passed since the reality of the first Latin American meeting of KDE contributors in 2012 in Porto Alegre, capital of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Now we are proud to announce that the second LaKademy will be held August 27th to 30th in S„o Paulo, Brazil, at one of the most important and prestigious universities in the world—the University of S„o Paulo.


  • diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development
    One problem with Linux has been its implementation of system calls. As Andy Lutomirski pointed out recently, it's very messy. Even identifying which system calls were implemented for which architectures, he said, was very difficult, as was identifying the mapping between a call's name and its number, and mapping between call argument registers and system call arguments..


  • Linux Foundation says many Linux admins and engineers are certifiable
    The Linux Foundation on Wednesday introduced two new certification programs aimed at connecting employers with qualified Linux administrators and engineers. "The supply of labor has been far outpaced by the demand for Linux," said Linux Foundation executive director Jim Zemlin.


  • How To Install ownCloud 7 Server and Client on OpenSuse 13.1
    This document describes how to install and configure ownCloud 7 on OpenSuse 13.1. I will also connect to the ownCloud Server's data with OpenSuse 13.1 Desktop, Ubuntu 14.04 desktop and windows 7 machine. ownCloud provides access to your data through a web interface or WebDAV while providing a platform to easily view, sync and share across devices—all under your control. ownCloud’s open architecture is extensible via a simple but powerful API for applications and plugins and works with any storage.




  • Bitter tablets
    I have children. My children go to school. The schools that my children go to teach ICT. To do so, they need computers. At two of those schools, there’s currently a drive to fund a bunch of iPads. Currently, said schools use a mix of desktop and laptop computers, and each has access to a bunch of interesting software tools that we parents can also get to play around with remotely in some cases. Granted, when one of my children comes home and asks if we can get a copy of said program for home it gets a bit awkward, not least when I check the prices, but there’s something useful, I think, about continuing to develop and teach keyboard and mouse skills.



  • Using Clocker and Apache Brooklyn to build a Docker cloud
    With the growing potential of Docker, it's becoming clear that the future of at least some of the data center is going to be containerized. But there are still challenges in getting containerized applications deployed and managed across real and virtual hardware.read more


  • Release 4.14 - KDE Applications get better and better
    The KDE Community has announced the latest major updates to KDE Applications delivering primarily improvements and bugfixes. Plasma Workspaces and the KDE Development Platform are frozen and receiving only long term support; those teams are focused on the transition to Plasma 5 and Frameworks 5.


  • U.S. Digital Services and Playbook:
    About this time last year, I laid out some trends I saw for the coming year in government take up of open source software. Looking back now, it appears those trends are not only here to stay, they are accelerating and are more important than ever.


  • Why do so many Linux users hate Oracle?
    In today's open source roundup: Many Linux users dislike and distrust Oracle. Plus: Munich may not be dumping Linux after all, and how to encrypt your email in Linux


  • Linux Foundation Debuts Linux Certification Effort
    Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundation, told eWEEK that for years his organization has been providing the Linux community with training, tutorials, mentoring programs and other educational outreach efforts. In fact, it was back in 2009 that the Linux Foundation first began its formal training programs. At the time, the Linux Foundation was not interested in doing any formal certification, but times have now changed.


  • Setup FTP server using VsFtp and Configure Secure FTP connections on Ubuntu 14.04 Server
    vsftpd is a GPL licensed FTP server for UNIX systems, including Linux. It is secure and extremely fast. It is stable. Don't take my word for it, though. Below, we will see evidence supporting all three assertions. We will also see a list of a few important sites which are happily using vsftpd. This demonstrates vsftpd is a mature and trusted solution.


  • Look, no client! Not quite: the long road to a webbified Vim
    The most revolutionary aspect of all the changes that have taken place in web development over the last two decades has been in the web browser. Typically we think of web browsers as driving innovation on the web by providing new features. Indeed this is the major source of new features on the web.



  • Linux Kernel Development Gets Two-Factor Authentication
    The security breach of 2011 was a very valuable lesson to the Linux community, and many recent initiatives have been aimed at continuously improving the overall security profile, Ryabitsev told eWEEK. The move to two-factor authentication, however, is not a delayed reaction to the 2011 kernel.org attack, according to Ryabitsev. -



  • Open health community management at Clinovo
    Olivier Roth, Community Manager at Clinovo, has grown an open source community around the open health platform ClinCapture, an open source Eletronic Data Capture (EDC) system.read more


  • Microsoft Lobby Denies the State of Chile Access to Free Software
    Fresh on the heels of the entire Munich and Linux debacle, another story involving Microsoft and free software has popped up across the world, in Chile. A prolific magazine from the South American country says that the powerful Microsoft lobby managed to turn around a law that would allow the authorities to use free software.


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  • When The World Sleeps
    Jawbone aggregated sleep data from their bands worn by people all around the world.


  • A Dubious 'Star Trek V' Scene Inspired A Dubious Product Tie-In
    The point of the "Star Trek V: The Final Frontier"†Kraft Marshmallow Dispenser isn’t to dispense marshmallows. It’s a collectible, made at the time for people obsessed with the ephemera of their favorite science-fiction franchise — and bought today off auction sites by people who think said ephemera is hilariously dumb.



  • Goliath Grouper Eats Shark In One Bite
    Just when you thought sharks were the kings of the sea, you learn that something called a Goliath grouper exists and eats sharks for its mid-morning snack.


  • Four Beheaded Corpses Found In Egypt's Sinai
    Four beheaded corpses were found by residents of a town in Egypt's Sinai Peninsula on Wednesday, security sources said, blaming Islamist militants waging an insurgency against Cairo.


  • The Island That Kids Learn To Leave
    The economic crisis of 2008 drove hundreds of thousands of young Irish people from their homeland in search of work - as a result some rural communities are on the verge of dying out.






  • The Simple Policy That Led To A Stunning Drop In Teen Births
    In the weeks it took Arlin Rueda to move from panic to fear and back again, she decided a few things. First, she would not have an abortion. Second, she didn’t think she could go through nine months of pregnancy without growing attached to the baby to be born, so adoption was out. Third, she did not want to become pregnant again.


  • Times Square Mascots Form Alliance
    Minnie Mouse and the Penguin from Batman huddled together, looking concerned. They were soon joined by Super Mario, Elmo, Hello Kitty and Goofy, who was carrying his big, plush head in his hands. After a few minutes of talking, they lined up in a row and began to clap and cheer: “Si se puede! Yes we can!”




  • The Curious, Formative Drawings Of Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid And Other Renowned Architects
    Just as news emerged that†an early Frank Gehry building is being turned into a Whole Foods†supermarket, curators at the†Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum†at Washington University in St. Louis are setting up an exhibition that offers a rare glimpse of early formative drawings and other handmade visuals from Frank Gehry, Zaha Hadid, Daniel Libeskind, Rem Koolhaas and other distinguished architects.


  • Behind The Best Pictures From Ferguson
    “When I got released from jail I asked my lawyer what happens if I get arrested again. They said, ‘We’ll pick you up again.’ I just wanted to keep working like I had been working all week.”


  • Joe Montana Is Scouting Startups
    Joe Montana is known around the Bay Area for bringing home the hardware — the former NFL quarterback won four Super Bowl rings with the 49ers in the ’80s and ’90s. Now, Montana is looking to add new hardware to his collection — or software, depending on your startup’s business idea.



  • U.S. Commandos Tried To Rescue Foley And Other Hostages
    A United States Special Operations team tried and failed to rescue James Foley and other Americans held hostage in Syria during a secret mission earlier this summer authorized by President Obama, senior administration officials said Wednesday.








  • Embarrassed To Photograph Ferguson
    Over the past few days journalists have joined groups of inciting protestors by getting dangerously close and not always following police orders.



  • The Interpreters
    The interpreters who worked for American forces during the recent Afghanistan war (and the many still working) are among America's bravest and most loyal allies. So that you don't have to take my word for it, I asked several U.S. Marines I'd met in Afghanistan — not the easiest people to impress — to share their thoughts.


  • Ferguson Through The Eyes Of A Teenager
    Transient Pictures followed teenager Shane Flowers as he weaved through the protests, attempting to let his voice be heard and fight for change with darkness slowly falling on Florissant Avenue. As he moves through the crowds, he hears differing opinions from other protesters on the best ways to fight for change.


  • The Men Who Killed James Foley
    There is no longer any doubt that the Internet, with its power of contagion and usefulness for recruiting, has become a preferred, particular tool of terrorists.



  • Did I Drop A Bomb On My Buddy?
    An American bomber pilot and German foot soldier become friends years after the fall of Hitler — without realizing how dangerously close their paths had converged.


  • Are Rabbits Pets Or Meat?
    Some people are incensed that Whole Foods is selling rabbit meat, and the debate they're caught up in reveals how we contradictorily relate to different creatures in different ways.



  • Spider-Woman Variant Cover Makes Us Ask 'WTF, Marvel?'
    Jessica Drew is the original Spider-Woman, a character invented by Stan Lee in 1978. She's strong, fast, immune to poisons and speaks several languages. So we have to ask: Why is Marvel treating her like a sex toy?


  • A Listenable History Of Kanye West’s Samples
    Kanye West’s songs have always been huge, elaborate affairs that either build off of an existing song or pick out the best parts of several others to create one coherent and cooler whole. And while West may be known for his early work with soul, his choice of samples has now made it all the way to Elton John and Bon Iver.



  • Billy Crystal To Deliver Robin Williams Tribute At Emmy Awards
    Billy Crystal†will lead a tribute to†Robin Williams†at Monday’s 66th Primetime†Emmy Awards, this year’s exec producer†Don Mischer†announced this morning. Crystal was the obvious choice — he and Whoopi Goldberg having teamed up several times with Williams, who†died†last week, in hosting Comic Relief specials that raised money to help the homeless.



  • The Talk
    How black parents prepare their young sons for life in America.


  • A Four-Year-Old Reviews The French Laundry
    For our fifth installment,†extreme fanciness edition, we took Lyla Hogan (favorite food: “good ice cream in a†hard†cone”) to what Anthony Bourdain has called “the best restaurant in the world, period.”


  • Did America’s Policy On Ransom Contribute To James Foley’s Killing?
    Foley’s execution is a chilling wake-up call for American and European policymakers, as well as U.S. news outlets and aid organizations. It is the clearest evidence yet of how vastly different responses to kidnappings by U.S. and European governments save European hostages but can doom the Americans.







  • U.S. Says ISIS Beheading Video Is Authentic
    American intelligence agencies on Wednesday verified the authenticity of a video showing the beheading of an American journalist by the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria amid angry outrage in the United States and Europe.


  • Why We Still Have Bezels
    Yesterday, the†first Sharp smartphone†to come to these great United States brought with it one of the skinniest bezels we've ever seen on a smartphone. The Aquos Crystal is visually impressive, and a major step into the frameless future that seems to be emerging. There's just one problem, though. Bezels matter. And we still need them.



  • The First Particle Physics Evidence of Physics Beyond the Standard Model?
    StartsWithABang writes It's the holy grail of modern particle physics: discovering the first smoking-gun, direct evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. Sure, there are unanswered questions and unsolved puzzles, ranging from dark matter to the hierarchy problem to the strong-CP problem, but there's no experimental result clubbing us over the head that can't be explained with standard particle physics. That is, the physics of the Standard Model in the framework of quantum field theory. Or is there? Take a look at the evidence from the muon's magnetic moment, and see what might be the future of physics.







  • National Science Foundation Awards $20 Million For Cloud Computing Experiments
    aarondubrow writes The National Science Foundation today announced two $10 million projects to create cloud computing testbeds — to be called "Chameleon" and "CloudLab" — that will enable the academic research community to experiment with novel cloud architectures and pursue new, architecturally-enabled applications of cloud computing. While most of the original concepts for cloud computing came from the academic research community, as clouds grew in popularity, industry drove much of the design of their architecture. Today's awards complement industry's efforts and enable academic researchers to advance cloud computing architectures that can support a new generation of innovative applications, including real-time and safety-critical applications like those used in medical devices, power grids, and transportation systems.







  • China Pulls Plug On Genetically Modified Rice and Corn
    sciencehabit writes China's Ministry of Agriculture has decided not to renew biosafety certificates that allowed research groups to grow genetically modified (GM) rice and corn. The permits, to grow two varieties of GM rice and one transgenic corn strain, expired on 17 August. The reasoning behind the move is not clear, and it has raised questions about the future of related research in China.







  • How Argonne National Lab Will Make Electric Cars Cheaper
    ashshy writes Argonne National Lab is leading the charge on next-generation battery research. In an interview with The Motley Fool, Argonne spokesman Jeff Chamberlain explains how new lithium ion chemistries will drive down the cost of electric cars over the next few years. "The advent of lithium ion has truly enabled transportation uses," Chamberlain said. "Because if you remember your freshman chemistry, you think of the periodic table -- lithium is in the upper left-hand corner of the periodic table. Only hydrogen and helium are lighter on an atomic basis."







  • Study: Seals Infected Early Americans With Tuberculosis
    mdsolar writes that a study suggests that tuberculosis first appeared in the New World less than 6,000 years ago and it was brought here by seals. After a remarkable analysis of bacterial DNA from 1,000-year-old mummies, scientists have proposed a new hypothesis for how tuberculosis arose and spread around the world. The disease originated less than 6,000 years ago in Africa, they say, and took a surprising route to reach the New World: it was carried across the Atlantic by seals. The new study, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, has already provoked strong reactions from other scientists. "This is a landmark paper that challenges our previous ideas about the origins of tuberculosis," said Terry Brown, a professor of biomolecular archaeology at the University of Manchester. "At the moment, I'm still in the astonished stage over this."







  • Smartphone Kill Switch, Consumer Boon Or Way For Government To Brick Your Phone?
    MojoKid writes We're often told that having a kill switch in our mobile devices — mostly our smartphones — is a good thing. At a basic level, that's hard to disagree with. If every mobile device had a built-in kill switch, theft would go down — who would waste their time over a device that probably won't work for very long? Here's where the problem lays: It's law enforcement that's pushing so hard for these kill switches. We first learned about this last summer, and this past May, California passed a law that requires smartphone vendors to implement the feature. In practice, if a smartphone has been stolen, or has been somehow compromised, its user or manufacturer would be able to remotely kill off its usability, something that would be reversed once the phone gets back into its rightful owner's hands. However, such functionality should be limited to the device's owner, and no one else. If the owner can disable a phone with nothing but access to a computer or another mobile device, so can Google, Samsung, Microsoft, Nokia or Apple. If the designers of a phone's operating system can brick a phone, guess who else can do the same? Everybody from the NSA to your friendly neighborhood police force, that's who. At most, all they'll need is a convincing argument that they're acting in the interest of "public safety."







  • Scientists Baffled By Unknown Source of Ozone-Depleting Chemical
    schwit1 writes: Scientists have found that, despite a complete ban since 2007, ozone-depleting chemicals are still being pumped into the atmosphere from some unknown source. "Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4), which was once used in applications such as dry cleaning and as a fire-extinguishing agent, was regulated in 1987 under the Montreal Protocol along with other chlorofluorocarbons that destroy ozone and contribute to the ozone hole over Antarctica. Parties to the Montreal Protocol reported zero new CCl4 emissions between 2007-2012. However, the new research shows worldwide emissions of CCl4 average 39 kilotons (about 43,000 U.S. tons) per year, approximately 30 percent of peak emissions prior to the international treaty going into effect. "We are not supposed to be seeing this at all," said Qing Liang, an atmospheric scientist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, and lead author of the study published online in the Aug. 18 issue of Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union. "It is now apparent there are either unidentified industrial leakages, large emissions from contaminated sites, or unknown CCl4 sources."







  • At Home with Tim O'Reilly (Videos 3 and 4 of 6)
    Today's videos are parts three and four of our casual interview with Tim O'Reilly, founder of O'Reilly Media and one of the most influential open source boosters around. (You supplied the questions. He supplied the answers.) We had a lot more to say about Tim yesterday when we ran parts one and two of our video interview with him. (Today's alternate Video Links: Video 3 ~ Video 4; transcript covers both videos.)







  • Do Readers Absorb Less On Kindles Than On Paper? Not Necessarily
    An anonymous reader writes eBooks are great and wonderful, but as The Guardian reports, they might not be as good for readers as paper books. Results from a new study show that test subjects who read a story on a Kindle had trouble recalling the proper order of the plot events. Out of 50 test subjects, half read a 28-page story on the Kindle, while half read the same story on paper. The Kindle group scored about the same on comprehension as the control group, but when they were asked to put the plot points in the proper order, the Kindle group was about twice as likely to get it wrong. So, is this bad news for ebooks? Have we reached the limits of their usefulness? Not necessarily. While there is evidence that enhanced ebooks don't enhance education, an older study from 2012 showed that students who study with an e-textbook on an ebook reader actually scored as well or higher on tests than a control group who did not. While that doesn't prove the newer research wrong, it does suggest that further study is required. What has your experience been with both recall and enjoyment when reading ebooks?







  • Tor Browser Security Under Scrutiny
    msm1267 writes: The keepers of Tor commissioned a study testing the defenses and viability of their Firefox-based browser as a privacy tool. The results (PDF) were a bit eye-opening since the report's recommendations don't favor Firefox as a baseline for Tor, rather Google Chrome. But Tor's handlers concede that budget constraints and Chrome's limitations on proxy support make a switch or a fork impossible.







  • Linus Torvalds: 'I Still Want the Desktop'
    darthcamaro writes: Linux has clawed its way into lots of places these days. But at the LinuxCon conference in Chicago today Linus Torvalds was asked where Linux should go next. Torvalds didn't hesitate with his reply. "I still want the desktop," Torvalds said, as the audience erupted into boisterous applause. Torvalds doesn't see the desktop as being a kernel problem at this point, either, but rather one about infrastructure. While not ready to declare a "Year of the Linux Desktop" he still expects that to happen — one day.







  • Researchers Find Security Flaws In Backscatter X-ray Scanners
    An anonymous reader writes: Researchers from UC San Diego, University of Michigan, and Johns Hopkins say they've found security vulnerabilities in full-body backscatter X-ray machines deployed to U.S. airports between 2009 and 2013. In lab tests, the researchers were able to conceal firearms and plastic explosive simulants from the Rapiscan Secure 1000 scanner, plus modify the scanner software so it presents an "all-clear" image to the operator even when contraband was detected. "Frankly, we were shocked by what we found," said lead researcher J. Alex Halderman. "A clever attacker can smuggle contraband past the machines using surprisingly low-tech techniques."







  • Helsinki Aims To Obviate Private Cars
    New submitter NBSCALIDBA writes: Eeva Haaramo reports on Helsinki's ambitious plan to transform city transportation. From on-demand buses to city bikes to Kutsuplus mini-transport vans, the Finnish capital is trying to change the whole concept of getting around in a city. "Under the plan, all these services will be accessed through a single online platform. People will be able to buy their transport in service packages that work like mobile phone tariffs: either as a complete monthly deal or pay as you go options based on individual usage. Any number of companies can use the platform to offer transport packages, and if users find their travel needs change, they'll be able to switch packages or moved to a rival with a better deal."







  • How To Read a Microbiome Study Like a Scientist.
    bmahersciwriter (2955569) writes Scientific reports have increasingly linked the bacteria in your gut to health and maladies, often making wild-sounding claims. Did you hear about the mice who were given fecal transplants from skinny humans and totally got skinny! Well, some of the more gut-busting results might not be as solid as they seem. Epidemiologist Bill Hanage offers five critical questions to ask when confronted by the latest microbiome research.







  • Google Receives Takedown Request Every 8 Milliseconds
    Via TorrentFreak comes news that Google is now being asked to remove one million links per day (or an average of one takedown notice every 8ms). In 2008, they received one takedown request approximately every six days. From the article: The massive surge in removal requests is not without controversy. It’s been reported that some notices reference pages that contain no copyrighted material, due to mistakes or abuse, but are deleted nonetheless. Google has a pretty good track record of catching these errors, but since manual review of all links is unachievable, some URLs are removed in error. ... The issue has also piqued the interest of U.S. lawmakers. Earlier this year the House Judiciary Subcommittee had a hearing on the DMCA takedown issue, and both copyright holders, Internet service providers, and other parties are examining what they can do to optimize the process. In the meantime, the number of removal requests is expected to rise and rise, with 10 million links per week being the next milestone.







  • World's First 3D Printed Estate Coming To New York
    New submitter Randy-tanner (3791853) writes A well known New York architect & contractor has begun construction on what is possibly the largest 3D printing related project ever undertaken. He is 3D printing an entire estate, which includes an in-ground swimming pool, a pool house, and a huge 2400 square foot home. The project is expected to take two years to complete, and if all goes as planned the printer will automatically insert rebar into the concrete.







  • Qt Upgrades From LGPLv2.1 to LGPLv3
    Digia has announced that existing Qt modules will now be covered under the LGPLv3 in addition to the LGPLv2.1, GPLv3, and the enterprise (proprietary) license. New modules will be dropping LGPLv2.1 and GPLv3+ and be released under the LGPLv3 and GPLv2+ instead. This should be a good move: new Qt modules will be Apache license compatible, LGPLv3 code can trivially be converted to GPLv3, and Digia is even releasing a few modules it intended to make proprietary as Free Software. The KDE Free Qt Foundation is on board. The move was made because of device vendors exploiting a loophole in the GPLv2/LGPLv2.1 that denied users the right to modify Qt or write their own applications. Digia has some self-interest as well, since those vendors were exploiting the tivoization loophole to avoid buying enterprise licenses. From the announcement: We also consider locked-down consumer devices using the LGPL’ed version of Qt to be harmful for the Qt ecosystem. ... Because of this, we are now adding LGPL v3 as a licensing option to Qt 5.4 in addition to LGPL v2.1. All modules that are part of Qt 5.3 are currently released under LGPL v2.1, GPL v3 and the commercial license. Starting with Qt 5.4, they will be released under LGPL v2.1, LGPL v3 and the commercial license. ... In Qt 5.4, the new Qt WebEngine module will be released under LGPL v3 in the open source version and under a LGPLv2.1/commercial combination for Qt Enterprise customers. ... Adding LGPLv3 will also allow us to release a few other add-ons that Digia before intended to make available solely under the enterprise license. ... The first module, called Qt Canvas3D, will give us full WebGL support inside Qt Quick. ... The second module is a lightweight WebView module ... There is a final add-on that will get released under LGPL v3. This module will give native look and feel to the Qt Quick Controls on Android. This module can’t be released under LGPL v2.1, as it has to use code that is licensed under Apache 2.0, a license that is incompatible with LGPL v2.1, but compatible with LGPL v3.







  • 51% of Computer Users Share Passwords
    An anonymous reader writes Consumers are inadvertently leaving back doors open to attackers as they share login details and sign up for automatic log on to mobile apps and services, according to new research by Intercede. While 52% of respondents stated that security was a top priority when choosing a mobile device, 51% are putting their personal data at risk by sharing usernames and passwords with friends, family and colleagues. The research revealed that consumers are not only sharing passwords but also potentially putting their personal and sensitive information at risk by leaving themselves logged in to applications on their mobile devices, with over half of those using social media applications and email admitting that they leave themselves logged in on their mobile device.







  • Interviews: Bjarne Stroustrup Answers Your Questions
    Last week you had a chance to ask Bjarne Stroustrup about programming and C++. Below you'll find his answers to those questions. If you didn't get a chance to ask him a question, or want to clarify something he said, don't forget he's doing a live Google + Q & A today at 12:30pm Eastern.







  • Kolab.org Groupware 3.3 Release Adds Tags, Notes, and Dozens of Other Features
    jrepin (667425) writes Version 3.3 of Kolab.org, a free and open source groupware solution, has been released. It is now possible to add tags to email messages, work with notes right in the webclient, and manage your resources more easily. Kolab.org 3.3 introduces a new folder navigation view that allows you to search and subscribe to shared calendars, address books, task lists etc. directly from within the respective view. The calendar got a quickview mode which allows you to open an undistorted view on a single calendar. The user interface can now be fully operated with the keyboard and has support for screen readers as well as voice output as suggested by the WCAG 2.0 Guidelines and WAI ARIA standards.







  • Kolab.org Groupware 3.3 Release Adds Tags, Notes, and Dozens of Other New Featur
    jrepin (667425) writes Version 3.3 of Kolab.org, a free and open source groupware solution, has been released. It is now possible to add tags to email messages, work with notes right in the webclient, and manage your resources more easily. Kolab.org 3.3 introduces a new folder navigation view that allows you to search and subscribe to shared calendars, address books, task lists etc. directly from within the respective view. The calendar got a quickview mode which allows you to open an undistorted view on a single calendar. The user interface can now be fully operated with the keyboard and has support for screen readers as well as voice output as suggested by the WCAG 2.0 Guidelines and WAI ARIA standards.







  • Your Phone Can Be Snooped On Using Its Gyroscope
    stephendavion (2872091) writes Researchers will demonstrate the process used to spy on smartphones using gyroscopes at Usenix Security event on August 22, 2014. Researchers from Stanford and a defense research group at Rafael will demonstrate a way to spy on smartphones using gyroscopes at Usenix Security event on August 22, 2014. According to the "Gyrophone: Recognizing Speech From Gyroscope Signals" study, the gyroscopes integrated into smartphones were sensitive enough to enable some sound waves to be picked up, transforming them into crude microphones.







  • Heartbleed To Blame For Community Health Systems Breach
    An anonymous reader writes: The Heartbleed vulnerability is the cause of the data breach at Community Health Systems, which resulted in 4.5 million records (containing patient data) being compromised. According to a blog post from TrustedSec, the attackers targeted a vulnerable Juniper router and obtained credentials, which allowed them access to the network's VPN.







  • How Patent Trolls Destroy Innovation
    walterbyrd sends this story from Vox: Everyone agrees that there's been an explosion of patent litigation in recent years, and that lawsuits from non-practicing entities (NPEs) — known to critics as patent trolls — are a major factor. But there's a big debate about whether trolls are creating a drag on innovation — and if so, how big the problem is. A new study (PDF) by researchers at Harvard and the University of Texas provides some insight on this question. Drawing from data on litigation, R&D spending, and patent citations, the researchers find that firms that are forced to pay NPEs (either because they lost a lawsuit or settled out of court) dramatically reduce R&D spending: losing firms spent $211 million less on R&D, on average, than firms that won a lawsuit against a troll. "After losing to NPEs, firms significantly reduce R&D spending — both projects inside the firm and acquiring innovative R&D outside the firm," the authors write. "Our evidence suggests that it really is the NPE litigation event that causes this decrease in innovation."







  • Wheel Damage Adding Up Quickly For Mars Rover Curiosity
    An anonymous reader writes: The folks in charge of the Mars rover Curiosity have been trying to solve an increasingly urgent problem: what to do about unexpected wheel damage. The team knew from the start that wear and tear on the wheels would slowly accumulate, but they've been surprised at how quickly the wheels have degraded over the past year. Emily Lakdawalla at the Planetary Society blog has posted a detailed report on the team's conclusions as to what's causing the damage and how they can mitigate it going forward. Quoting: "The tears result from fatigue. You know how if you bend a metal paper clip back and forth repeatedly, it eventually snaps? Well, when the wheels are driving over a very hard rock surface — one with no sand — the thin skin of the wheels repeatedly bends. The wheels were designed to bend quite a lot, and return to their original shape. But the repeated bending and straightening is fatiguing the skin, causing it to fracture in a brittle way. The bending doesn't happen (or doesn't happen as much) if the ground gives way under the rover's weight, as it does if it's got the slightest coating of sand on top of rock. It only happens when the ground is utterly impervious to the rover's weight — hard bedrock. The stresses from metal fatigue are highest near the tips of the chevron features, and indeed a lot of tears seem to initiate close to the chevron features."












  • LOHAN packs bags for SPACEPORT AMERICA!
    Spanish launch goes titsup, we're off to the US of A
    The traditional portentous drumroll and fanfare of trumpets has added timpani and a throbbing bass synth crescendo today as we announce that the planned launch of our our Low Orbit Helium Assisted Navigator (LOHAN) mission has been relocated to New Mexico's Spaceport America.…



  • Roll up for El Reg's MONOPOLY PUB CRAWL
    Part one: Measuring how many bars you get in London
    Special Report In January I was in the pub with Richard, an old school friend I hadn’t seen for 30 years and whom I was keen to impress. Then he asked one of those seemingly simple questions. “Simon,” he said. “You’ll know which 4G network I should be on”.…




  • Boffins propose security shim for Android
    Hoping Choc Factory wants third-party infosec sweeties
    An international group of researchers believes Android needs more extensible security, and is offering up a framework they hope either Google or mobe-makers will take for a spin.…




  • Apple's iWatch? They cannae do it ... they don't have the POWER
    Analyst predicts fanbois will have to wait until next year
    Tech analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, who has a decent track record on Apple production issues, has risked breaking the hearts of fanbois everywhere with the prediction that the iWatch might not be released until next year.…






  • Microsoft exits climate denier lobby group
    ALEC will have to do without Redmond, it seems
    After a year of participating in the American Legislative Exchange Council, Microsoft has decided that even tangential alignment with a high-profile oil-funded lobby is not what it wants.…





  • Oi! Rip Van Winkle: PATCH, already
    Stuxnet, Sality, Gauss, Flame still infecting your unpatched boxen
    Nearly 20 million computers remain infected with malware targeting a vulnerability first targeted four years ago by the Stuxnet worm.…














  • Can it be true? A BIG DATA benchmark? Yes, says TPC
    Vendor-neutral stats for tech's biggest meaningless buzzword
    Up until now there hasn't been an objective or standard way of comparing different suppliers' big data systems performance. The Transaction Processing Council (TPC) is remedying that with its TPCx-HS benchmark.…







  • The Register to boldly go where no Vulture has gone before: The WEEKEND
    No more aching 2-day void to wait through each week
    On the internet there are certain things you can be pretty sure of. Nubile young women lusting after you probably aren't (any of those things); free stuff almost certainly isn't free, and may not even be stuff; and after 5pm San Francisco time on Friday there probably won't be anything decent published on the Register until the Australian Vultures have had their first cup of coffee on Monday.…



  • Video of US journalist 'beheading' pulled from social media
    Yanked footage featured British-accented attacker and US journo James Foley
    Twitter and Facebook have taken steps to close down the accounts of militant Islamic State supporters after the publication of a video that appeared to show a man with a British accent "beheading" the American journalist James Foley.…



  • Brother, can you spare a DIME for holy grail of secure webmail?
    Lavabit man's new project: One of security's thorniest problems
    Feature Lavabit founder Ladar Levison promised attendees at security conference DefCon that he'd carve out a secure messaging service from the wreckage of the email service favoured by rogue NSA sysadmin Edward Snowden within six months.…


  • The agony and ecstasy of SteamOS: WHERE ARE MY GAMES?
    And yes it does need a fat HDD (or SSD, it's cool with either)
    Game Theory Gamers' perception of Steam over the years has changed considerably. This digital distribution platform, which was developed by Valve, was met with derision when it launched back in 2004 – but jump forward 10 years and Steam is the coolest kid on the block. What self-respecting gamer doesn’t blow all their money on a Steam sale these days?…



  • Wall Street woes: Oh noes, tech titans aren't using bankers
    Get out your hankies: Facebook, Google use in-house teams
    Worstall on Wednesday There was much astonishment over at the New York Times as it explained that the big Silicon Valley tech firms, the Googles, Apples, Facebooks, aren't using the traditional services of the Wall Street bankers as they make their acquisitions.…



Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM