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  • Red Hat: 2014:1101-01: kernel: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated kernel packages that fix multiple security issues and several bugs are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.4 Extended Update Support. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Important security [More...]



  • Indian Firefox OS phones start at $33
    Intex and Spice launched the first Firefox OS phones in India using a low-cost Spreadtrum design: the $33 Intex Cloud FX and the $38 Spice Fire One Mi-FX 1. Mozilla announced two new Firefox OS phones in India that have blasted through smartphone price barriers. The two phones, which are the first in Asia to run Mozilla’s Linux- and HTML5-based Firefox OS platform, are priced at a low 1,999 Indian Ruppees ($33) for the Intex Technologies Cloud FX and $2,299 Rs ($38) for the Spice Fire One Mi-FX 1 from Spice Retail Limited. The low-end phones are about a half to a third the price of the most affordable Android phones sold in India.



  • How to share on linux the output of your shell commands
    Some time ago I posted an article about shelr.tv a website and a service that was made to allow you to share your terminal records directly from the website. Now the website of shelr.tv seems dead and so I’ve took a look around to see if there are similar websites and I’ve found commands.com. For what I can see from their homepage it’s a service similar to the other, so let’s test it.


  • Fix Linux display issues
    Find HorizSync VertRefresh rates to fix Linux display issue – Why my display is stuck at 640×480? I have a NVIDIA GTX460 Graphics card on my current machine and a Acer 22" Monitor. After installing NVIDIA driver, my display was stuck at 640x480 and no matter what I do, nothing fixed it. This is an unusual problem with NVIDIA driver. I am assuming Intel and ATI driver might have similar issues.


  • LXer Weekly Roundup for 31-Aug-2014
    [url=IMG[/img][/url] [b]LXer Feature: 31-Aug-2014[/b]In the Roundup this week we have Mozilla's new programming language Rust, 14 Raspberry Pi projects, with the 23rd Birthday of Linux on the 25th we have some interesting facts about Linux, did Red Hat’s CTO walk or was he pushed?, what happens when a non-coder tries to learn Linux and a lot more. Enjoy!



  • How to change an user password under Linux
    If you manage a server with many different users or just your family computer you will probably have many different accounts to manage, and one important aspect of any account it’s its password. In this small article I’ll show you how to use the basic passwd command but also how to do some small bash script or use a web application, if you have a more complex environment, such as a central ldap server that keep all your accounts information.


  • Low-Spec Hardware? Try these Desktop Environments
    I have selected my pick of desktop environments that are excellent candidates for older hardware. They typically run well on low-spec machines, even a system with a Pentium II 266MHz CPU, a processor that is now 16 years old. All of the desktops are released under freely distributable licenses. If your Linux box feels sluggish in general use, try one of the desktops featured below. It may just save you from discarding a perfectly good machine.



  • NotepadConf
    NotepadConf: the textiest conference you'll attend! See the latest technological advancements in plaintext editing. Meet the luminaries of the market and some sneak peaks at what's coming next!





  • Splitting a File Elegantly
    In a previous Linux Rain article I compared different ways to delete blank lines, and showed that the AWK way was the simplest and most thorough. Here I show how to split a text file into multiple text files using a surprisingly simple AWK command.



  • Scrivener Software for Writers: The Linux Versoin
    Scrivener is a widely loved Mac-based writing tool used by many authors. The Linux version is a subset of the original, compiled from a subset of the Windows-based code. It is still cool, though.



  • Bingo!... Is Not Patentable Just Because You Put It On The Internet
    Another day, another story of stupid software patents getting stomped out of existence thanks to the Supreme Court's Alice v. CLS Bank ruling. As we've been noting, this ruling is looking like it's going to invalidate a ton of software patents (and that's a good thing). The latest one dumped was an attempt to patent bingo online. Yes, bingo.


  • How to install Suhosin on a Linux VPS
    Suhosin is an advanced protection system for scripts and the PHP core itself. It is an open source PHP patch used for protecting the users and servers against numerous vulnerabilities and security flaws in the PHP basaed applications including WordPress, Joomla, Drupal, etc…



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  • The Spellbinding Mathematical GIFs Of Dave Whyte
    Whyte, a Dublin-based PhD candidate studying the physics of foam, tells Colossal's Christopher Jobson "his first geometric gifs riffed on computational modules he was exploring while in undergrad."


  • Meant For Kids
    The new cover for Roald Dahl’s “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” has no whiff of childish imagination — instead, it implies a deviant adult audience.


  • The Evolution Of ATM Skimmers
    In a little over a decade, ATM skimmers have gone from urban myth to a wildly complex, ever-evolving suite of technologies that has the potential to be the worst nightmare of anyone with a bank account.


  • Roadmap To Alpha Centauri
    The mysteries encountered by the Voyagers compel scientists to embark on follow-up missions that venture even deeper into the cosmic woods — out to 200 AU and beyond. But what kind of spacecraft can get us there?



  • Album Sales In America Just Hit An All-Time Low
    U.S. album sales hit 3.97-million last week, the smallest weekly total for album sales since Nielsen SoundScan first began tracking data in 1991, Billboard's Ed Christman and Glenn Peoples report.





  • Why Uber Must Be Stopped
    The touted start-up is proving to be the embodiment of unrestrained hyper-capitalism. What happens when it wins?


  • I Ghostwrite Chinese Students' Ivy League Admissions Essays
    I’m a black market college admissions essay writer, and over the last three years I’ve written over 350 fraudulent essays for wealthy Chinese exchange students. Although my clients have varied from earnest do-gooders to factory tycoon’s daughters who communicate primarily through emojis, they all have one thing in common: They’re unable to write meaningful sentences.




  • 'The Swapper,' 'Hotline Miami' And Existential Avatars
    Gaming’s most recognizable characters have also been some of its most loosely drawn — partly because they've been around since before the technology could convey much complexity, but also because blank slates can become iconic when the gameplay is great and the surrounding cast is strong.


  • What Is The Earth Worth?
    VSauce walks us through a variety of rubrics to figure out what the value of all of our collective stuff is. Get used to hearing the word "quadrillion."




  • The Houston Astros Go All In On Data Analysis
    It was the fall of 2003. Michael Lewis’s book Moneyball, about the statistics-driven approach of Billy Beane’s Oakland A’s, sat atop the bestseller list. It caused a number of owners to rethink their own approach, which provided Jeff Luhnow, a former management consultant, entry into a game that otherwise wouldn’t have had a place for him.


  • How Unpopular Buildings Came Into Fashion
    Could there ever be a more bizarre choice of name for an architectural movement than Brutalism? Just one look at these old buildings used to make people go "UGH" but now it's more like "Oooh."




  • R.I.P. MSN Messenger
    Microsoft started to phase out MSN Messenger (also known as Windows Live Messenger) globally in April 2013 and it will be completely shut down on October 31st. MSN Messenger is only available in mainland China until then.





  • The Truth About Beats By Dre
    Beats don't sound all that good and are overpriced. But, as Marquis Brownlee explains, that's not really the point.



  • Music, Dance And Culture Are A Lifeline In Congo
    The Congolese have long been neglected by those in power, doing what they can to get by in one of the world’s least developed countries. But music, religion, dance and even fashion offer both a lifeline and an escape.


  • How Ought We Die?
    Secular medicine’s original exclusions prevent us from understanding the process of death.



  • The American Dream, Undocumented
    Robbed while crossing the border, Hugo showed up in Durham with little more than a bump on his face where the thieves in the desert had broken his nose. Eighteen years later, Hugo still doesn’t have legal immigration status, but that hasn’t stopped him from securing the trappings of the American middle class: a steady job, a wife, three kids, a dog and — as of this summer — a home to call his own.


  • The Tyranny Of The Text Bubble
    It’s called the “typing awareness indicator,” and a few months ago, my therapist ordered me to disable it on my phone. “It’s causing you too much anxiety,” she said, pointing to the iPhone I had in a white-knuckle grip. “It’s giving monumental weight to matters of a text message.”


  • Why The Heck Some Good Runners Started Running In The First Place
    Interestingly, even some of the best in the running biz did not go into it for love of covering ridiculous distances on foot. While yet a clean slate, before their judgment was tainted by the sweet taste of success, here's what motivated some great runners to take that first knob-kneed stride.


  • Taking The Tuba Above And Beyond The Low End
    Bob Stewart's exploration of melody on the tuba ranges from a Thelonious Monk standard to a classical suite commissioned for the ensemble. His son Curtis says this broad mix brings to mind a modern phenomenon.



  • Burning Man’s Billionaires Row
    Let it be said: all of Burning Man is a show of wealth. Tickets are $380, sure, but many of the art cars cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. Not to mention the neon furs, the metallic leggings and lights.





  • A Beginner’s Guide To The 'Star Trek' Franchise
    'Star Trek' is more than pop culture: it’s 20th century mythology with its own complicated mythos. “Beam me up” and “live long and prosper” may have invaded the cultural lexicon, but 'Star Trek' is particularly intimidating for the uninitiated.




  • Michael Sam Cut By St. Louis Rams
    The St. Louis Rams released defensive end Michael Sam on Saturday, the team announced. Sam's efforts to become the first openly gay player in NFL history came up just short in a competition against undrafted rookie Ethan Westbrooks.




  • How Indie Films Became The Future Of Rom-Coms
    The genre’s success has never been dependent on fresh storytelling or bold ideas, but the romantic chemistry of its leads. If the romance itself, the spark and fizz and dazzle of it all, was believable, the film could be too, no matter how silly its premise may sound on paper.




  • Sumo On The Offense
    He was once a rich and famous sumo wrestler in Japan, now he's going for broke, trying to make it in the NFL.


  • What Your 1st-Grade Life Says About The Rest Of It
    Inside the ground-breaking and ultimately saddening 25-year study conducted by Johns Hopkins researchers Karl Alexander and Doris Entwisle, that examined 314 people from the first grade all the way to adulthood at age 28.



  • Apple Said To Team With Visa, MasterCard On iPhone Wallet
    An anonymous reader writes with news about a possible partnership between Apple and major credit card companies. Apple plans to turn its next iPhone into a mobile wallet through a partnership with major payment networks, banks and retailers, according a person familiar with the situation. The agreement includes Visa, MasterCard, and American Express and will be unveiled on Sept. 9 along with the next iPhone, said the person, who asked not to be identified because the talks are private. The new iPhone will make mobile payment easier by including a near-field communication chip for the first time, the person said. That advancement along with Touch ID, a fingerprint recognition reader that debuted on the most recent iPhone, will allow consumers to securely pay for items in a store with the touch of a finger.







  • Grand Ayatollah Says High Speed Internet Is "Against Moral Standards"
    An anonymous reader writes A Grand Ayatollah in Iran has determined that access to high-speed and 3G Internet is "against Sharia" and "against moral standards." However, Iran’s President Hassan Rouhani, plans to renew licenses and expand the country’s 3G cellular phone network. A radical MP associated with the conservative Resistance Front, warned: “If the minister continues to go ahead with increasing bandwidth and Internet speed, then we will push for his impeachment and removal from the cabinet.” “We will vigorously prevent all attempts by the [communication] minister to expand 3G technology, and if our warnings are not heeded, then the necessary course of action will be taken,” he added.







  • XKCD Author's Unpublished Book Remains a Best-Seller For 5 Months
    destinyland writes Tuesday is the official release date for the newest book from the geeky cartoonist behind XKCD — yet it's already become one of Amazon's best-selling books. Thanks to a hefty pre-order discount, one blogger notes that it's appeared on Amazon's list of hardcover best-sellers since the book was first announced in March, and this weekend it remains in the top 10. Randall Munroe recently announced personal appearances beginning this week throughout the U.S. (including Cambridge, New York, Seattle, and the San Francisco Bay Area) — as well as a Google Hangout on Friday, September 12. Just two weeks ago he was also awarded the Hugo Award for Best Graphic Story — and now many of his appearances are already sold out.







  • Yahoo Stops New Development On YUI
    First time accepted submitter dnebin writes Yahoo announced that they will cease new development on their javascript framework YUI, bowing to industry trends towards Node.js, Angular, and others. The announcement reads in part: "The consequence of this evolution in web technologies is that large JavaScript libraries, such as YUI, have been receiving less attention from the community. Many developers today look at large JavaScript libraries as walled gardens they don't want to be locked into. As a result, the number of YUI issues and pull requests we've received in the past couple of years has slowly reduced to a trickle. Most core YUI modules do not have active maintainers, relying instead on a slow stream of occasional patches from external contributors. Few reviewers still have the time to ensure that the patches submitted are reviewed quickly and thoroughly."







  • The Apache Software Foundation Now Accepting BitCoin For Donations
    rbowen writes The Apache Software Foundation is the latest not-for-profit organization to accept bitcoin donations, as pointed out by a user on the Bitcoin subreddit. The organization is well known for their catalog of open-source software, including the ubiquitous Apache web server, Hadoop, Tomcat, Cassandra, and about 150 other projects. Users in the community have been eager to support their efforts using digital currency for quite a while. The Foundation accepts donations in many different forms: Amazon, PayPal, and they'll even accept donated cars. On their contribution page the Apache Software Foundation has published a bitcoin address and QR code.







  • DNA Reveals History of Vanished "Paleo-Eskimos"
    An anonymous reader writes The earliest people in the North American Arctic remained isolated from others in the region for over 4,000 years before vanishing around 700 years ago, new analysis shows. The study also reveals that today's Inuit and Native Americans of the Arctic are genetically distinct from the region's first settlers. "A single founding population settled, and endured the harsh environmental conditions of the Arctic, for almost 5,000 years — during which time the culture and lifestyle changed enough to be represented as distinct cultural units," explained Dr Maanasa Raghavan, first author of the new paper.







  • Feds Want Nuclear Waste Train, But Don't Know Where It Would Go
    mdsolar writes with news of a plan to move radioactive waste from nuclear plants. The U.S. government is looking for trains to haul radioactive waste from nuclear power plants to disposal sites. Too bad those trains have nowhere to go. Putting the cart before the horse, the U.S. Department of Energy recently asked companies for ideas on how the government should get the rail cars needed to haul 150-ton casks filled with used, radioactive nuclear fuel. They won't be moving anytime soon. The latest government plans call for having an interim test storage site in 2021 and a long-term geologic depository in 2048. No one knows where those sites will be, but the Obama administration is already thinking about contracts to develop, test and certify the necessary rail equipment.







  • Ukraine Asks Zuckerberg to Discipline Kremlin Facebook Bots
    mi writes "Ukrainian media is reporting (link in Ukrainian), that Facebook is getting increasingly heavy-handed blocking Ukrainian bloggers. The likely explanation for the observed phenomenon is that Facebook's Ukrainian office is located in Russia and is headed by a Russian citizen (Catherine Skorobogatov). For example, a post calling on Russian mothers to not let their sons go to war was blocked "Due to multiple complaints". Fed up, Ukrainian users are writing directly to Zukerberg to ask him to replace Catherine with someone, who would not be quite as swayed by the "complaints" generated by Russian bots.







  • Update: Raspberry Pi-Compatible Development Board Cancelled
    An anonymous reader writes "Anyone who might have been interested in the miniature Raspberry Pi compatible board mentioned here a month ago should know the board has been cancelled due to problems sourcing the Broadcom SoC. Given the less than welcoming response from the rpi community to the board's release, there is speculation as to why Hardkernel is having trouble buying the chip.







  • Feynman Lectures Released Free Online
    Anna Merikin writes In 1964, Richard Feynman delivered a series of seven hour-long lectures at Cornell University which were recorded by the BBC, and in 2009 (with a little help from Bill Gates), were released to the public. The three-volume set may be the most popular collection of physics books ever written, and now the complete online edition has been made available in HTML 5 through a collaboration between Caltech (where Feyman first delivered these talks, in the early 1960s) and The Feynman Lectures Website. The online edition is "high quality up-to-date copy of Feynman's legendary lectures," and, thanks to the implementation of scalable vector graphics, "has been designed for ease of reading on devices of any size or shape; text, figures and equations can all be zoomed without degradation." Volume I deals mainly with mechanics, radiation and heat; Volume II with electromagnetism and matter; and Volume III with quantum mechanics. Last year we told you when Volume I was made available. It's great to see the rest added.







  • Microsoft Shutting Down MSN Messenger After 15 Years of Service
    First time accepted submitter airfuz writes Microsoft took a bold move announcing that users have to move away from the old version of internet explorer to the new version 11. And now not long after that, Microsoft announced that they are shutting down the 15 year old MSN Messenger. Most people have moved away from the service to Facebook and other mobile based messenger such as Whatsapp and so MSN is left with few users. But still, ending a 15 year messaging service like the MSN Messenger means something to the one's who grew up using it.







  • Iceland Raises Volcano Aviation Alert Again
    An anonymous reader writes Iceland's authorities have raised an aviation warning for a region close to the Bardarbunga volcano after a small fissure eruption in the area. The eruption began around 0600 GMT prompting the Icelandic Met Office to raise the aviation warning code to red for the Bardarbunga/Holuhraun area, the Department of Civil Protection and Emergency Management said in a statement. The country's meteorological agency described the eruption as a "very calm lava eruption and can hardly be seen on seismometers."







  • Battle of the Heavy Lift Rockets
    schwit1 writes: Check out this detailed and informative look at the unspoken competiton between NASA's SLS rocket and SpaceX's planned heavy lift rocket. It's being designed to be even more powerful than the Falcon Heavy. Key quote: "It is clear SpaceX envisions a rocket far more powerful than even the fully evolved Block 2 SLS – a NASA rocket that isn't set to be launched until the 2030s." The SpaceX rocket hinges on whether the company can successfully build its new Raptor engine. If they do, they will have their heavy lift rocket in the air and functioning far sooner than NASA, and for far less money.







  • Post-Microsoft Nokia Offering Mapping Services To Samsung
    jfruh writes: With Nokia's Windows Phone handset line sold off to Microsoft, one of the company's remaining businesses is its Here digital mapping service. No longer feeling loyalty to Microsoft or its OS, Nokia has inked a deal with Samsung to supply Here services to both Tizen and Android devices, including the upcoming Samsung smartwatch.







  • RAYA: Real-time Audio Engine Simulation In Quake
    New submitter bziolko writes: RAYA is a realtime game audio engine that utilizes beamtracing to provide user with realistic audio auralization. All audio effects are computed based on the actual geometry of a given game level (video) as well as its acoustic properties (acoustic materials, air attenuation). The sound changes dynamically along with movement of the game character and sound sources, so the listener can feel as if they were right there — in the game.







  • Anand Lal Shimpi Retires From AnandTech
    An anonymous reader writes: If you've built a PC in the past 17.5 years, chances are you read some hardware reviews on AnandTech at some point. The site's creator, Anand Lal Shimpi, has announced that he is retiring from the tech writing business. He said, "AnandTech started as a site that primarily reviewed motherboards, then we added CPUs, video cards, cases, notebooks, Macs, smartphones, tablets and anything else that mattered. The site today is just as strong in coverage of new mobile devices as it is in our traditional PC component coverage ... To the millions of readers who have visited and supported me and the site over the past 17+ years, I owe you my deepest gratitude. You all enabled me to spend over half of my life learning more than I ever could have in any other position. The education I've received doing this job and the ability to serve you all with it is the most amazing gift anyone could ever ask for. You enabled me to get the education of a lifetime and I will never be able to repay you for that. Thank you."







  • Microsoft Defies Court Order, Will Not Give Emails To US Government
    schwit1 sends this excerpt from a report about Microsoft: Despite a federal court order directing Microsoft to turn overseas-held email data to federal authorities, the software giant said Friday it will continue to withhold that information as it waits for the case to wind through the appeals process. The judge has now ordered both Microsoft and federal prosecutors to advise her how to proceed by next Friday, September 5. Let there be no doubt that Microsoft's actions in this controversial case are customer-centric. The firm isn't just standing up to the US government on moral principles. It's now defying a federal court order. "Microsoft will not be turning over the email and plans to appeal," a Microsoft statement notes. "Everyone agrees this case can and will proceed to the appeals court. This is simply about finding the appropriate procedure for that to happen."







  • Wi-Fi Router Attack Only Requires a Single PIN Guess
    An anonymous reader writes: New research shows that wireless routers are still quite vulnerable to attack if they don't use a good implementation of Wi-Fi Protected Setup. Bad implementations do a poor job of randomizing the key used to authenticate hardware PINs. Because of this, the new attack only requires a single guess at the hardware PIN to collect data necessary to break it. After a few hours to process the data, an attacker can access the router's WPS functionality. Two major router manufacturers are affected: Broadcom, and a manufacturer to be named once they get around to fixing it. "Because many router manufacturers use the reference software implementation as the basis for their customized router software, the problems affected the final products, Bongard said. Broadcom's reference implementation had poor randomization, while the second vendor used a special seed, or nonce, of zero, essentially eliminating any randomness."







  • Google's Megan Smith Would Be First US CTO Worthy of the Title
    theodp writes: Bloomberg is reporting that Google X's Megan Smith is the top candidate for U.S. Chief Technology Officer. With a BS/MS in Mechanical Engineering from MIT, and experience ranging from General Magic to Google, Smith would arguably be the first U.S. CTO worthy of the title (the outgoing U.S. CTO has a bachelor's in Econ; his predecessor has a master's in Public Policy). "Smith joined Google in 2003. As vice president of business development, she oversaw many of its most important acquisitions, like Keyhole, the service that underlies Google Earth. She has led the company’s philanthropic division, Google.org, and served as a co-host for Google’s Solve for X forum, where distinguished thinkers and scientists brainstorm radical technology ideas with Google executives."







  • States Allowing Medical Marijuana Have Fewer Painkiller Deaths
    An anonymous reader writes: Narcotic painkillers aren't one of the biggest killers in the U.S., but overdoses do claim over 15,000 lives per year and send hundreds of thousands to the emergency room. Because of this, it's interesting that a new study (abstract) has found states that allow the use of medical marijuana have seen a dramatic reduction in opioid overdose fatalities. "Previous studies hint at why marijuana use might help reduce reliance on opioid painkillers. Many drugs with abuse potential such as nicotine and opiates, as well as marijuana, pump up the brain's dopamine levels, which can induce feelings of euphoria. The biological reasons that people might use marijuana instead of opioids aren't exactly clear, because marijuana doesn't replace the pain relief of opiates. However, it does seem to distract from the pain by making it less bothersome." This research comes at a time when the country is furiously debating the costs and benefits of marijuana use, and opponents of the idea are paying researchers to paint it in an unfavorable light.







  • NASA's Competition For Dollars
    An anonymous reader writes: We often decry the state of funding to NASA. Its limited scope has kept us from returning to the moon for over four decades, maintained only a minimal presence in low-Earth orbit, and failed to develop a capable asteroid defense system. But why is funding such a problem? Jason Callahan, who has worked on several of NASA's annual budgets, says it's not just NASA's small percentage of the federal budget that keeps those projects on the back burner, but also competition for funding between different parts of NASA as well. "[NASA's activities include] space science, including aeronautics research (the first A in NASA), technology development, education, center and agency management, construction, maintenance, and the entire human spaceflight program. The total space science budget has rarely exceeded $5 billion, and has averaged just over half that amount. Remember that space science is more than just planetary: astrophysics, heliophysics, and Earth science are all funded in this number. Despite this, space science accounts for an average of 17 percent of NASA's total budget, though it has significant fluctuations. In the 1980s, space science was a mere 11 ½ percent of NASA's budget, but in the 2000s, it made up 27 percent."







  • Ask Slashdot: Best Phone Apps?
    An anonymous reader writes: The phone app ecosystem has matured nicely over the past several years. There are apps for just about everything I need to do on my phone. But I've noticed that once an app fills a particular need, I don't tend to look for newer or potentially better apps that would replace it. In a lot of areas, I'm two or three years out of date — maybe there's something better, maybe not. Since few people relish the thought of installing, testing, and uninstalling literally hundreds of apps, I thought I'd put the question to the Slashdot community: what interesting, useful new(ish) apps are you aware of? This can be anything from incredibly slick, well-designed single purpose apps to powerful multi-function apps to entertainment-oriented apps.







  • Hidden Obstacles For Google's Self-Driving Cars
    Paul Fernhout writes: Lee Gomes at MIT's Technology Review wrote an article on the current limits of Google self-driving car technology: "Would you buy a self-driving car that couldn't drive itself in 99 percent of the country? Or that knew nearly nothing about parking, couldn't be taken out in snow or heavy rain, and would drive straight over a gaping pothole? If your answer is yes, then check out the Google Self-Driving Car, model year 2014. Google often leaves the impression that, as a Google executive once wrote, the cars can 'drive anywhere a car can legally drive.' However, that's true only if intricate preparations have been made beforehand, with the car's exact route, including driveways, extensively mapped. Data from multiple passes by a special sensor vehicle must later be pored over, meter by meter, by both computers and humans. It's vastly more effort than what's needed for Google Maps. ... Among other unsolved problems, Google has yet to drive in snow, and Urmson says safety concerns preclude testing during heavy rains. Nor has it tackled big, open parking lots or multilevel garages. ... Pedestrians are detected simply as moving, column-shaped blurs of pixels — meaning, Urmson agrees, that the car wouldn't be able to spot a police officer at the side of the road frantically waving for traffic to stop."







  • Reformatting a Machine 125 Million Miles Away
    An anonymous reader writes: NASA's Opportunity rover has been rolling around the surface of Mars for over 10 years. It's still performing scientific observations, but the mission team has been dealing with a problem: the rover keeps rebooting. It's happened a dozen times this month, and the process is a bit more involved than rebooting a typical computer. It takes a day or two to get back into operation every time. To try and fix this, the Opportunity team is planning a tricky operation: reformatting the flash memory from 125 million miles away. "Preparations include downloading to Earth all useful data remaining in the flash memory and switching the rover to an operating mode that does not use flash memory. Also, the team is restructuring the rover's communication sessions to use a slower data rate, which may add resilience in case of a reset during these preparations." The team suspects some of the flash memory cells are simply wearing out. The reformat operation is scheduled for some time in September.







  • Judge Allows L.A. Cops To Keep License Plate Reader Data Secret
    An anonymous reader writes: A Los Angeles Superior Court judge has ruled that the Los Angeles Police Department is not required to hand over a week's worth of license plate reader data to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF). He cited the potential of compromising criminal investigations and giving (un-charged) criminals the ability to determine whether or not they were being targeted by law enforcement (PDF). The ACLU and the EFF sought the data under the California Public Records Act, but the judge invoked Section 6254(f), "which protects investigatory files." ACLU attorney Peter Bibring notes, "New surveillance techniques may function better if people don't know about them, but that kind of secrecy is inconsistent with democratic policing."







  • Rubish WPS config sees WiFi router keys popped in seconds
    Another day, another way in to your home router
    Passwords within routers sold by chipset manufacturer Broadcom and an unnamed vendor can be accessed within seconds thanks to weak or absent key randomisation, security bod Dominique Bongard has claimed.…



  • Hot students, 'liquid coolant', bagpipes and Brazilians: It's a cluster compo, folks
    Edinburgh, Sao Paulo uni teams chase glory
    HPC Blog Both the UK and South America were ably represented at the recent 2014 International Supercomputing Conference Student Cluster Competition, held in Leipzig, Germany. For some reason, I want to Google up trendy cuisine to see if Scottish-Brazilian fusion restaurants actually exist. But I'm afraid of the possible results – so let's rather take a close and personal look at these two teams....…



  • Broadcom reveals $20 'Pi in the sky' IoT development widget
    'WICED Sense' comes with sensors and wireless so devs can wire things into stuff
    Broadcom has released a US$20 Internet of Things thing it hopes will give developers a cut-price way to explore the sensor-tised kinds of applications a wired world enables.…


  • Yahoo! YUI! project! is! no! more!
    The world overtook us, yet AGAIN says Purple Palace
    Yahoo! has announced that its Yahoo! User Interface (YUI) project is redundant in the age of node.js and better browsers.…



  • Drone-maker slapped for illegal exports
    Jet-powered UAV sent offshore without the right paperwork
    A Western Australian maker of drones – no, not the toys beloved of Jeff Bezos, a more serious kind – has copped both fines and confiscations after trying to export its products without a permit.…



  • Hardkernel nixes RPi clone project
    Odroid-W zeroed by SoC supply
    Hardkernel, which last month announced its intention to build a Raspberry Pi clone, has abruptly quit the idea.…


  • Australia deflates Valve with Steam sueball
    Alleges breaches of Oz consumer law
    The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) has fired the sueball-gun at Valve, accusing the game-maker of trying to dodge Australian consumer law.…


  • JLaw, Upton caught in celeb nude pics hack
    100 women victimised as Apple iCloud accounts reportedly popped
    Naked photos of US celebrities including Jennifer Lawrence, Kate Upton and Ariana Grande have been published online by an anonymous hacker who reportedly obtained the explicit pics from the victims' Apple iCloud accounts.…


  • Today's weather is brought to you by BigCorp.com
    Australia's Bureau of Meteorology allowed to sling ads, but not politics
    The most popular site on the dot-gov-au domain, the Bureau of Meteorology, has been okayed to start taking advertising – with some restrictions.…






  • GCHQ protesters stick it to British spooks ... by drinking urine
    Activists told NOT to snap pics of staff at the concrete doughnut
    A number of protesters haranguing UK spies stationed at the country's Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ) have taken to apparently drinking human urine to publicise their disgust with the eavesdropping nerve centre's surveillance tactics.…


  • 'I think photographers get TOO MUCH copyright for their work'
    Reg commentards' views, sliced and diced for your delight and delectation
    CoTW Copyright is a basic property right. It's one of those fundamental things you just don't muck around with: if someone creates something and others want to use it, they should be paid. Everyone agrees with this - except for one Register reader...…



  • If you think 3D printing is just firing blanks, just you wait
    Feeling sticky, punk?
    Something for the Weekend, Sir? This week I met a gun nut. I knew this immediately because he was an American with a moustache. Americans with moustaches are always gun nuts. Don’t blame me, I don’t make the rules. It is simply the way of things.…







  • Love XKCD? Love science? You'll love a book about science from Randall Munroe
    Cartoonist tackles your Fermi problems in What If?
    Page File They say you shouldn’t get a fan to review a book and it’s certainly tough to be critical when you pick up the new book from Randall Munroe, the much-loved creator of awesome science webcomic XKCD. What If? is a series of usually ridiculous questions from the public to XKCD’s inbox that Munroe answers using science and mathematics.…







  • Tim Cook: 'I'd call what's going on in fondleslabs a speed bump'
    Plus: 'Another sh*t feature of Word that's driving me to distraction...'
    QuoTW Time Warner Cable did not have a good week this week. A number of folks came out over the week to tell the Federal Communications Commission that they don’t like the idea of the company merging with Comcast. And in the middle of all that, the firm suffered a massive outage that downed a number of big cities on both the East and West Coasts of the US.…








  • Ninja Pirate Zombie Vampires versus Chuck Norris and the Space Marines
    Harvest of Brains
    Weekend Big Data Project No fewer than 1,784 of you kindly volunteered to have your brains slurped in the initial stage of the Weekend Register's pioneering attempt to use hefty-data techniques to solve the most pressing puzzle of our era - namely who would win in a fight: pirates, ninjas, zombies, vampires, werewolves, aliens, robots, jedi, various kinds of human troops, and plucky civilians with improvised weapons?…



  • Community chest: Storage firms need to pay open-source debts
    Samba implementation? Time to get some devs on the job
    Storagebod Linux and *BSD have completely changed the storage market. They are the core of so many storage products, allowing startups and established vendors alike to bring new products to the market more rapidly than previously possible.…










Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM