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  • Red Hat: 2014:0434-01: qemu-kvm-rhev: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated qemu-kvm-rhev packages that fix several security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 4.0. The Red Hat Security Response Team has rated this update as having Moderate [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:0435-01: qemu-kvm-rhev: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated qemu-kvm-rhev packages that fix several security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 3.0. The Red Hat Security Response Team has rated this update as having Moderate [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:0432-01: kernel: Important Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated kernel packages that fix one security issue and several bugs are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.4 Extended Update Support. The Red Hat Security Response Team has rated this update as having [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:0433-01: kernel: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated kernel packages that fix two security issues, three bugs, and add one enhancement are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5. The Red Hat Security Response Team has rated this update as having Moderate [More...]



  • Red Hat: 2014:0429-01: tomcat6: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated tomcat6 packages that fix three security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6. The Red Hat Security Response Team has rated this update as having Moderate [More...]








  • Install Kid3 v3.1 Audio Tag Editor in Ubuntu 14.04
    Kid3 is a powerful audio tag editor for KDE with support for formats like MP3, Ogg/Vorbis, FLAC, MPC, MP4/AAC, MP2, Speex, TrueAudio and WAV. Kid3 allows you to edit common tags over multiple files as well.


  • Out Of The Park Baseball 15 Released On Linux
    For you extreme Baseball fans (is baseball mostly American?) Out of the Park Baseball 15 has been released on Steam for Linux promising you the ability to manage your dream team.




  • BASIC programming with Gambas for the beginner programmer
    Scratch is a great tool for teaching programming to young children, but what happens when kids outgrow Scratch? Among Raspberry Pi aficionados, the typical answer is to advance to using Python, which is an excellent choice. However, in honor of the 50th birthday of BASIC, I would like to suggest another programming environment: Gambas.


  • Five common pitfalls to avoid in open source
    Open source software, hardware, and methods are gaining popularity and access to them couldn't be more prolific. If you're thinking about starting a new open source project, there are five common pitfalls you should be aware of before you begin.Don't despair if you've already started your project and are just now reading this! These pointers can be helpful at any stage if things are still running smoothly.Fail faster and succeed with open source.5 common pitfalls of a new open source project


  • How to close an open DNS resolver
    The DNS server that we have created in the previous tutorial is an open DNS resolver. An open resolver does not filter any incoming requests, and accepts queries from any source IP address. Unfortunately, an open resolver can become an easy target to attackers. For example, attackers can initiate a Denial of Service (DoS) or […]Continue reading...The post How to close an open DNS resolver appeared first on Xmodulo.Related FAQs:How to run iptables automatically after reboot on DebianWhat are available iptables management tools with GUI?How to set up a transparent proxy on LinuxHow to count the number of open network connections on LinuxHow to set up a transparent HTTPS filtering proxy on CentOS


  • Designing a Prize for Usable Cryptography
    EFF is evaluating the feasibility of offering a prize for the first usable, secure, and private end-to-end encrypted communication tool. We believe a prize based on objective usability metrics (such as the percentage of users who were able to install and start using the tool within a few minutes, and the percentage who survived simulated impersonation or man-in-the-middle attacks) might be an effective way to determine which project or projects are best delivering communication security to vulnerable user communities; to promote and energize those tools; and to encourage interaction between developers, interaction designers and academics interested in this space.


  • US government accelerating development and release of open source
    I had a chance to catch up with David A. Wheeler, a long-time leader in advising and working with the US government on issues related to open source software. As early as the late 1990s, David was demonstrating why open source software was integral to the US goverment IT architecture, and his personal webpage is a frequently cited source on open standards, open source software, and computer security.In this interview, we explore the current state of use of open source software by the US government, the challenges of the Federal acquisition system, and what he's excited about as he looks ahead for open source and government.


  • Tiny Core 5.3 Fluxbox Screenshot Tour
    Team Tiny Core is pleased to announce the release of Tiny Core Linux 5.3: Changelog: BusyBox - updated nosuid to 1.22.1, added ntpd, corrected dc failure, modified wget timeout to 10s; tce-load - don't show an error when extension contains multiple modules; tc-config - change owner /tmp/tce/optional to support tftplist; tce-load - use sudo when unmounting meta-extensions; added full path to sudo commands; tc-config - introduce ntpserver boot option; switch getTime.sh to ntpd; replace aliases with functions in useBusyBox.


  • Ubuntu 14.04 review: Missing the boat on big changes
    Canonical pushed out Ubuntu 14.04 last week. This release is the first Ubuntu Long Term Support release in two years and will be supported for the next five years.It feels like, for Canonical at least, this Long Term Support release couldn't have come at a worse time. The company is caught in a transitional phase as it moves from a desktop operating system to a platform that spans devices.


  • Audacious 3.5 Gets Tens New Features, Screenshots, Ubuntu PPA Installation
    Audacious is an advanced, feature-complete music player for GNOME using GTK 3 that bundles many features, a clean interface, support for real-time audio effects, visualization, equalizer, lyrics and other plugins, themes (including Winamp Classic style with installable skins), powerful configuration options and multiple playlists organized in tabs.



  • Net neutrality dead for good? FCC may endorse pay-for-play deals
    FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler confirmed today that proposed rules to replace the net neutrality regulations struck down by a court decision are on track for an FCC vote on May 15.Wheeler didn't detail exactly what those rules would be, but The Wall Street Journal says it has a source who knows."The Federal Communications Commission plans to propose new open Internet rules on Thursday that would allow content companies to pay Internet service providers for special access to consumers, according to a person familiar with the proposal," the Journal reported.


  • Hackable media-streaming speaker does HiFi with tubes
    Tubecore’s “Duo” wireless media-streaming speaker embeds a Raspberry Pi or Udoo SBC, and features Bluetooth and WiFi, plus a 48v Class A analog-tube preamp. At $649, discounted to $479 in the current pre-order phase, the Duo costs more than typical $50 to $200 wireless speakers. However, it’s also a full media player that can stream […]



  • Black Lab Linux 5.0.1 Enterprise Released
    Today the Black Lab Linux team is pleased to announce the release of its Enterprise edition 5.0.1 to current and prospective customers. With this release we have fixed a myriad of problems experienced with release 4.2.5. The fastest growing alternative to Red Hat Enterprise Linux has just gotten better.


  • Mark Shuttleworth Hints at 14.10 Codename: Utopic Unicorn
    In a post on his personal blog Mark Shuttleworth expressed his willing to do something unified and upright, something about which we can be universally proud in the next Ubuntu release, but he also gave us a hint about the codename which 14.10 will have: Utopic Unicorn.


  • Raspberry Pi-like boardset boasts quad-core i.MX6
    SolidRun revealed a Raspberry Pi-like “HummingBoard” boardset for its Linux-ready CuBox mini-PCs, based on a Freescale i.MX6 SoC located on a tiny COM. SolidRun created the community-backed “HummingBoard” to serve as a modular motherboard for use in its Linux- and Android-ready CuBox mini-PCs, including the recent CuBox-i models. Like the recently announced, Allwinner A20-based Banana […]



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  • An Entire Restaurant With Tables For One
    A new pop-up restaurant in Amsterdam, which bills itself as the world’s first for solo eaters, aims to remove the social stigma of forking dinner without a companion. In fact, there isn’t a two-top in the joint.



  • Up Close On Baseball’s Borders
    Using aggregated data provided by Facebook, we were able to create an unprecedented look at the geography of baseball fandom, going down not only to the county level, as Facebook did in a nationwide map it released a few weeks ago, but also to ZIP codes.


  • Video Of Simon Ostrovsky Questioning His Future Captor
    Before Simon Ostrovsky was detained and held by pro-Russia separatists in Sloviansk, he filed this dispatch featuring an interview with his future captor, the city's self-appointed "people's mayor," Vyacheslav Ponomarev.





  • The Life And Death Of Spuds MacKenzie
    If, by chance, you don't know who Spuds MacKenzie is, it's probably because he hasn't been on television since 1989. Spuds sold beer and — this may be hard to believe — he was one of the most famous living things on the planet.




  • The Untold Story Of Larry Page's Incredible Comeback
    Larry Page is the Steve Jobs of Google. As with Jobs, it took a long exile for Page to mature into a self-awareness of his strengths and weaknesses. And, like Jobs, Page came back with wild ambitions and new resolve.





  • Cliven Bundy's Racist Tirade Caught On Tape
    Cliven Bundy, a Nevada rancher recently championed by conservatives for resisting attempts by the federal government to restrict the land his cattle grazes on, was captured spewing incredibly racist remarks.



  • How The Sharing Economy Finally Got Americans To Trust Each Other
    The sharing economy has come on so quickly and powerfully that regulators and economists are still grappling to understand its impact. But one consequence is already clear: Many of these companies have us engaging in behaviors that would have seemed unthinkably foolhardy as recently as five years ago.




  • Mind Uploading Won’t Lead To Immortality
    Uploading the content of one's mind, including one's personality, memories and emotions, into a computer may one day be possible, but it won't transfer our biological consciousness and won't make us immortal.


  • Putin Calls The Internet A 'CIA Project'
    President Vladimir Putin on Thursday called the Internet a CIA project and made comments about Russia's biggest search engine Yandex, sending the company's shares plummeting.


  • Scientists Discover New Shape Using Rubber Bands
    While setting out to fabricate new springs to support a cephalopod-inspired imaging project, a group of Harvard researchers stumbled upon a surprising discovery: the hemihelix, a shape rarely seen in nature.







  • The Third 'Hobbit' Is Now Subtitled 'The Battle Of The Five Armies'
    J.R.R. Tolkien's "The Hobbit" has seen many ups and downs in its journey to the screen. It's changed director, gone from two films to three, and now sees the third film retitled from "There And Back Again," the book's subtitle, to "The Hobbit: The Battle Of The Five Armies."


  • From Whistleblower To Minimum Wage Worker
    State Department whistleblower Peter Van Buren took an unlikely fall into the minimum-wage world when he lost his job in 2012. Today, he gives us a first-hand look at what it's like to subsist in poverty-wage America.



  • The Found Poetry Of Fieri’s Vegas Kitchen & Bar Menu
    The following poem is comprised of 10 of the exclamations from the Guy Fieri’s Vegas Kitchen & Bar menu. The sentences have been copied verbatim, except that their exclamation points have been replaced with other punctuation. I call it “Ode on a Gnarly Greek Salad.”



  • The Long Life Of Child Pornography
    The Supreme Court bent the legal force field again in a child-pornography case, allowing victims to recover damages not from those who created or distributed the pornography but from those who viewed it. Herewith an object lesson in how law reflects our moral preoccupations.







  • Panel Says U.S. Not Ready For Inevitable Arctic Oil Spill
    sciencehabit (1205606) writes "As eagerness to explore the Arctic's oil and gas resources grows, the threat of a major Arctic oil spill looms ever larger—and the United States has a lot of work to do to prepare for that inevitability, a panel convened by the National Research Council (NRC) declares in a report released yesterday. The committee, made up of members of academia and industry, recommended beefing up forecasting systems for ocean and ice conditions, infrastructure for supply chains for people and equipment to respond, field research on the behavior of oil in the Arctic environment, and other strategies to prepare for a significant spill in the harsh conditions of the Arctic." Shortest version: no one has any idea how any spill cleanup techniques would work in the arctic environment.







  • Ask Slashdot: Books for a Comp Sci Graduate Student?
    peetm (781139) writes "Having visited with me and my wife recently, the girlfriend of an ex-student of mine (now taking an M.Sc. in pure CS) asked me to suggest useful books for her boyfriend: '... He recently mentioned that he would love to have a home library, like the one you have, with variety of good, useful and must-have books from different authors. ... Mostly, I was thinking your advice would be priceless when it comes to computer science related books, but .. I would appreciate any sort of advice on books from you. ...' Whilst I could scan my own library for ideas, I doubt that I'm really that 'current' with what's good, or whether my favorites would be appropriate: I've not taught on the M.Sc. course for a while, and in some cases, and just given their price, I shouldn't really recommend such books that are just pet loves of mine — especially to someone who doesn't know whether they'd even be useful. And, before you ask: YES, we do have a reading list, but given that he'll receive this as part of this course requirement anyway, I'd like to tease readers to suggest good reads around the periphery of the subject." I'll throw out Pierce's Types and Programming Languages (and probably Advanced Topics in Types and Programming Languages ), and Okasaki's Purely Functional Data Structures .







  • Are Habitable Exoplanets Bad News For Humanity?
    An anonymous reader writes "The discovery of Kepler-186f last week has dusted off an interesting theory regarding the fate of humanity and the link between that fate and the possibility of life on other planets. Known as the The Great Filter, this theory attempts to answer the Fermi Paradox (why we haven't found other complex life forms anywhere in our vast galaxy) by introducing the idea of an evolutionary bottleneck which would make the emergence of a life form capable of interstellar colonization statistically rare. As scientists gear up to search for life on Kepler-186f, some people are wondering if humanity has already gone through The Great Filter and miraculously survived or if it's still on our horizon and may lead to our extinction."







  • New White House Petition For Net Neutrality
    Bob9113 (14996) writes "On the heels of yesterday's FCC bombshell, there is a new petition on the White House petition site titled, 'Maintain true net neutrality to protect the freedom of information in the United States.' The body reads: 'True net neutrality means the free exchange of information between people and organizations. Information is key to a society's well being. One of the most effective tactics of an invading military is to inhibit the flow of information in a population; this includes which information is shared and by who. Today we see this war being waged on American citizens. Recently the FCC has moved to redefine "net neutrality" to mean that corporations and organizations can pay to have their information heard, or worse, the message of their competitors silenced. We as a nation must settle for nothing less than complete neutrality in our communication channels. This is not a request, but a demand by the citizens of this nation. No bandwidth modifications of information based on content or its source.'"







  • Google Plus Now Minus Chief Vic Gundotra
    JG0LD (2616363) writes "Vic Gundotra, the man behind Google Plus and one of Google's most prominent executives, announced today that he will leave the company 'effective immediately.' Gundotra made the announcement, appropriately enough, in a lengthy Google Plus post, praising his co-workers and saying that he is 'excited about what's next.' However, he did not further outline his future plans, saying that 'this isn't the day to talk about that.'"







  • Verizon and New Jersey Agree 4G Service Equivalent to Broadband Internet
    An anonymous reader writes with news that Verizon and New Jersey regulators have reached a deal releasing Verizon from their obligation to have brought 45Mbps broadband to all NJ residents by 2010. Instead, 4G wireless service is considered sufficient. From the article: "2010 came and went and a number of rural parts of the state are still living with dial-up or subpar DSL. And even though the original deal was made in the days of modems and CompuServe, its crafters had the foresight to define broadband as 45Mbps, which is actually higher than many Verizon broadband customers receive today. ... In spite of that, and the thousands of legitimate complaints from actual New Jersey residents, the BPU voted unanimously yesterday to approve a deal with Verizon ... According to the Bergen Record, Verizon will no longer be obligated to provide broadband to residents if they have access to broadband service from cable TV providers or wireless 4G service. ... Residents who happen to live in areas not served by cable or wireless broadband can petition Verizon for service, but can only get broadband if at least 35 people in a single census tract each agree to sign contracts for a minimum of one year and pay $100 deposits."







  • Consumers Not Impressed With 3D Printing
    Lucas123 (935744) writes "Putting a 3D printer beside the coffee maker in every home, as some manufacturers hope will happen someday, is a long ways from reality as consumers today still don't understand how the technology will benefit them, according to a new study. The study, by Juniper Research, states that part of the problem is that killer applications with the appropriate eco-system of software, apps and materials have yet to be identified and communicated to potential users. And, even though HP has announced its intention to enter the 3D printing space (possibly this fall) a massive, mainstream corporation isn't likely to change the market."







  • New Shape Born From Rubber Bands
    sciencehabit (1205606) writes "Physicists playing with rubber bands have discovered a new shape. In an attempt to create a spring that replicates the light-bending properties of cuttlefish ink sacs, a team of researchers suspended two rubber strips of different lengths. Connecting the bottoms of the two strips to a cup of water, the shorter band stretched to the same length as the longer one. After gluing the two stretched strips together, the researchers gradually drained the water from the cup. As the bands retracted and twisted from the reduced strain, the researchers were shocked to see the formation of a hemihelix with multiple rainbow-shaped boundaries called perversions. The team hopes their work inspires nanodevices and molecules that twist and transform from flat strips into predetermined 3D shapes on demand." There are several videos attached to the original paper, and all can be viewed without flash.







  • Astronomers Discover Pair of Black Holes In Inactive Galaxy
    William Robinson (875390) writes "The Astronomers at XMM-Newton have detected a pair of supermassive black holes at the center of an inactive galaxy. Most massive galaxies in the Universe are thought to harbor at least one supermassive black hole at their center. And a pair of black holes is indication of strong possibility that the galaxies have merged. Finding black holes in quiescent galaxies is difficult because there are no gas clouds feeding the black holes, so the cores of these galaxies are truly dark. It can be only detected by this 'tidal disruption event'."







  • Brazil Approves Internet Bill of Rights
    First time accepted submitter Dr.Potato (247646) writes "After more than three years being discussed, Brazil's Internet Bill of Rights was approved on April 22nd (and in Portuguese). It was rushed through the senate in order that president Dilma Roussef could sign it during the meeting on internet governance that occurs in São Paulo this week. In the bill of rights, among other things, net neutrality was maintained, providers will not be legally responsible for content published by users (but are forced to take it down when legally requested) and internet providers are obliged to keep records of users' access for six months and can't pass this responsibility to other companies." Brazilian internet users may continue to have the right to be surveilled on social media, too.







  • DC Revolving Door: Ex-FCC Commissioner Is Now Head CTIA Lobbyist
    jfruh (300774) writes "Up until three years ago, Meredith Attwell Baker was an Obama-appointed FCC commissioner. Now she's the newly minted CEO of the CTIA, the nation's largest lobbying group for the mobile phone industry. How can we expect regulators to keep a careful watch over industries when high-paying jobs in those industries await them after retirement? One of the most damning sentences in that article: 'More than 80 percent of FCC commissioners since 1980 have gone on to work for companies or groups in the industries they used to regulate.'"







  • Lumina: PC-BSD's Own Desktop Environment
    jones_supa (887896) writes "The PC-BSD project is developing a new open source (BSD license) desktop environment from scratch. The name of the project is Lumina and it will be based around the Qt toolkit. The ultimate goal is to replace KDE as the default desktop of PC-BSD. Lumina aims to be lightweight, stable, fast-running, and FreeDesktop.org/XDG compliant. Most of the Lumina work is being done by PC-BSD's Ken Moore. Even though Lumina is still in its early stages, it can be built and run successfully, and an alpha version can already be obtained from PC-BSD's ports/package repositories."







  • DIY Wearable Pi With Near-Eye Video Glasses
    coop0030 (263345) writes "Noe & Pedro Ruiz at Adafruit have created a pair of open source near-eye video glasses combined with a Raspberry Pi. Their 3D Printed design turns a pair of 'private display glasses' into a "google glass"-like form factor. It easily clips to your prescription glasses, and can display any kind of device with Composite Video like a Raspberry Pi. They have a video demonstrating the glasses, a tutorial on how to build them, along with the 3d files required to print it out."







  • Anonymous' Airchat Aim: Communication Without Need For Phone Or Internet
    concertina226 (2447056) writes "Online hacktivist collective Anonymous has announced that it is working on a new tool called Airchat which could allow people to communicate without the need for a phone or an internet connection — using radio waves instead. Anonymous, the amorphous group best known for attacking high profile targets like Sony and the CIA in recent years, said on the project's Github page: 'Airchat is a free communication tool [that] doesn't need internet infrastructure [or] a cell phone network. Instead it relies on any available radio link or device capable of transmitting audio.' Despite the Airchat system being highly involved and too complex for most people in its current form, Anonymous says it has so far used it to play interactive chess games with people at 180 miles away; share pictures and even established encrypted low bandwidth digital voice chats. In order to get Airchat to work, you will need to have a handheld radio transceiver, a laptop running either Windows, Mac OS X or Linux, and be able to install and run several pieces of complex software." And to cleanse yourself of the ads with autoplaying sound, you can visit the GitHub page itself.







  • Previously Unknown Warhol Works Recovered From '80s Amiga Disks
    First time accepted submitter mooterSkooter (1132489) writes "Magnetic Imaging tools were used to recover a dozen images produced by Andy Warhol on his Amiga computer. I would've just stuck the disks in and tried to copy it myself." Read more about it from the Frank Ratchye Studio for Creative Inquiry, which says "The impetus for the investigation came when [artist Cory] Arcangel, a self-described “Warhol fanatic and lifelong computer nerd,” learned about Warhol’s Amiga experiments from the YouTube video of the 1985 Commodore Amiga product launch. Acting on a hunch, and with the support of CMOA curator Tina Kukielski, Arcangel approached the AWM in December 2011 regarding the possibility of restoring the Amiga hardware in the museum’s possession, and cataloging any files on its associated diskettes. In April 2012, he contacted Golan Levin, a CMU art professor and director of the FRSCI, a laboratory that supports “atypical, anti-disciplinary and inter-institutional” arts research. Offering a grant to support the investigation, Levin connected Cory with the CMU Computer Club, a student organization that had gained renown for its expertise in “retrocomputing,” or the restoration of vintage computers."







  • Microsoft, Google, Others Join To Fund Open Source Infrastructure Upgrades
    wiredmikey (1824622) writes "Technology giants including Microsoft, Google, Intel, and Cisco are banding together to support and fund open source projects that make up critical elements of global information infrastructure. The new Core Infrastructure Initiative brings technology companies together to identify and fund open source projects that are widely used in core computing and Internet functions, The Linux Foundation announced today. Formed primarily as the industry's response to the Heartbleed crisis, the OpenSSL library will be the initiative's first project. Other open source projects will follow. The funds will be administered by the Linux Foundation and a steering group comprised of the founding members, key open source developers, and other industry stakeholders. Anyone interested in joining the initiative, or donating to the fund can visit the Core Infrastructure Initiative site."







  • iPad Fever Is Officially Cooling
    Hugh Pickens DOT Com (2995471) writes "Christina Bonnington reports that the public is not gobbling up iPads like they used to. Analysts had projected iPad sales would reach 19.7 million but Apple sold 16.35 million iPads, a drop of roughly 16.4 percent since last year. 'For many, the iPad they have is good enough–unlike a phone, with significant new features like Touch ID, or a better camera, the iPad's improvements over the past few years have been more subtle,' writes Bonnington. 'The latest iterations feature a better Retina display, a slimmer design, and faster processing. Improvements, yes, but enough to justify a near thousand dollar purchase? Others seem to be finding that their smartphone can do the job that their tablet used to do just as well, especially on those larger screened phablets.' While the continued success of the iPad may be up in the air, another formerly popular member of Apple's product line is definitely on its way to the grave. The iPod, once Apple's crown jewel, posted a sales drop of 51 percent since last year. Only 2.76 million units were sold, a far cry from its heyday of almost 23 million back in 2008. 'Apple's past growth has been driven mostly by entering entirely new product categories, like it did when it introduced the iPod in 2001, the iPhone in 2007, and the iPad in 2010,' says Andrew Cunningham. 'The most persistent rumors involve TV (whether a new Apple TV set-top box or an entire television set) and wearable computing devices (the perennially imminent "iWatch"), but calls for larger and cheaper iPhones also continue.'"







  • Australian Law Enforcement Pushes Against Encryption, Advocates Data Retention
    angry tapir (1463043) writes "Australia is in the middle of a parliamentary inquiry examining telecommunications interception laws. Law enforcement organisations are using this to resurrect the idea of a scheme for mandatory data retention by telcos and ISPs. In addition, an Australian law enforcement body is pushing for rules that would force telcos help with decryption of communications."







  • NASA Chief Tells the Critics of Exploration Plan: "Get Over It"
    mknewman (557587) writes "For years, critics have been taking shots at NASA's plans to corral a near-Earth asteroid before moving on to Mars — and now NASA's chief has a message for those critics: 'Get over it, to be blunt.' NASA Administrator Charles Bolden defended the space agency's 20-year timeline for sending astronauts to the Red Planet on Tuesday, during the opening session of this year's Humans 2 Mars Summit at George Washington University in the nation's capital."







  • "Going Up" At 45 Mph: Hitachi To Deliver World's Fastest Elevator
    Zothecula (1870348) writes "Hitachi has announced that it's installing the world's fastest ultra-high-speed elevators in the Guangzhou CTF Finance Centre skyscraper in Guangzhou, China. Making up two out of a total of 95 elevators in the building, Hitachi says the new lifts use a range of technologies to produce record-breaking speeds of 1,200 m/min while still meeting the necessary standards of safety and comfort."







  • Band Releases Album As Linux Kernel Module
    netbuzz (955038) writes "A band called netcat is generating buzz in software circles by releasing its debut album as a Linux kernel module (among other more typical formats.) 'Are you ever listening to an album, and thinking "man, this sounds good, but I wish it crossed from user-space to kernel-space more often!" We got you covered,' the band says on its Facebook page. 'Our album is now fully playable as a loadable Linux kernel module.'"







  • WhatsApp Is Well On Its Way To A Billion Users
    redletterdave (2493036) writes "In just two months since Facebook dropped $19 billion to buy WhatsApp, the five-year-old mobile messaging app on Tuesday announced its its active user base has grown to more than half a billion people. This is not the first time that an app has seen a major pop in users after it was acquired by Facebook: When Facebook bought Instagram in April 2012, the service boasted some 30 million users. In one month after the deal, Instagram gained 20 million new users. By July, Instagram grew to 80 million active users. WhatsApp seems to be having a similar growth spurt, gaining roughly 25 million users each month since the Facebook deal was announced."







  • NYPD's Twitter Campaign Backfires
    An anonymous reader writes "A NYPD community outreach campaign designed to show images of citizens with cops turned ugly quickly when a deluge of images depicting police brutality came in. From the article: 'The responses soon turned ugly when Occupy Wall Street tweeted a photograph of cops battling protesters with the caption "changing hearts and minds one baton at a time." Other photos included an elderly man bloodied after being arrested for jaywalking.' Police Commissioner Bill Bratton says, 'I kind of welcome the attention,' of the #myNYPD project."







  • F.C.C., In Net Neutrality Turnaround, Plans To Allow Fast Lane
    Dega704 (1454673) writes in with news of the latest FCC plan which seems to put another dagger in the heart of net neutrality. "The Federal Communications Commission will propose new rules that allow Internet service providers to offer a faster lane through which to send video and other content to consumers, as long as a content company is willing to pay for it, according to people briefed on the proposals. The proposed rules are a complete turnaround for the F.C.C. on the subject of so-called net neutrality, the principle that Internet users should have equal ability to see any content they choose, and that no content providers should be discriminated against in providing their offerings to consumers."







  • Mobile Game Attempts To Diagnose Alzheimer's
    the_newsbeagle writes "Currently, the best way to check if a person has a high likelihood of developing Alzheimer's is to perform a PET scan to measure the amount of amyloid plaque in his or her brain. That's an expensive procedure. But a startup called Akili Interactive says it has developed a mobile game that can identify likely Alzheimer's patients just by their gameplay and game results. The game is based on a neuroscience study which showed that multitasking is one of the first brain functions to take a hit in Alzheimer's patients. Therefore the game requires players to perform two tasks at the same time."







  • Microsoft beats cloud drum as revenues remain solid but flat
    Office 365, Azure, and yes, even Bing to lead the way, Nadella assures us
    Microsoft reported flat revenues and shrinking profits for the third quarter of its fiscal 2014, but that was still better news than the analysts were expecting to hear.…


  • Vladimir Putin says internet is a 'CIA project'
    In Soviet Đ¯ussia, politician trolls internet!
    Russian president Vladimir Putin provided further indications that his administration will be tightening control over internet access in the country on Thursday, when he condemned the internet as being a CIA-controlled "project".…






  • FCC insists proposed internet rules won't 'gut' net neutrality
    But pay-for-play is on the way
    The Federal Communications Commission chairman Tom Wheeler has confirmed reports that proposed changes to internet governance will abandon net neutrality principles and says companies can charge extra for some types of traffic so long as it's "commercially reasonable."…


  • Facebook: Need help click-farming? Check out our NEWSWIRE
    FB Newswire shows what's trending on social network, creates Ouroboros of news
    Critics of modern media like to say the industry is rife with lowest-common-denominator articles loaded with the kind of rubbish that gets shared vigorously across social networks. Advertising company and content-farmer Facebook appears to think the same, judging by its just-announced "FB Newswire" service.…






  • Teen girl arrested with 70-year-old man's four inch weapon inside her
    Charged with introducing .22 snubbie to penile facility. It wasn't firing blanks
    A 19-year-old Tennessee girl cuffed earlier this week for allegedly driving with a suspended licence is in a spot more bother – after jail officers reportedly discovered a loaded .22 revolver in her vagina.…




  • List prices mean zilch. Remember that when buying from upstarts
    Be nice to vendors – even if they're the new kids on the block
    Storagebod Storage industry blogger Howard Marks has written about telling storage startups apart from upstarts. Except, when you dig into his piece, it reads more like how to be a savvy tech buyer.…



  • Reg probe bombshell: How we HACKED mobile voicemail without a PIN
    Months after Leveson inquiry, your messages are still not secure
    Special report Voicemail inboxes on two UK mobile networks are wide open to being hacked. An investigation by The Register has found that even after Lord Leveson's press ethics inquiry, which delved into the practice of phone hacking, some telcos are not implementing even the most basic level of security.…


  • Euro recession over as sales rebound for mega distie Ingram Micro
    But huge IT biz suckerpunched in the profits by restructuring
    Economic recovery on both sides of the Atlantic – and to a lesser extent sales of Apple's iPhone in certain countries across Europe – helped Ingram Micro offset declines in its mobility and Asia Pacific wings… but only just.…







  • DeSENSORtised: Why the 'Internet of Things' will FAIL without IPv6
    What's stopping a tinyputer invasion? An IP address shortage, says Cisco
    Analysis For more than 20 years, it has been clear that the internet will eventually run out of public IPv4 addresses. Despite that limit, online businesses have been slow to adopt IPv6, which has an abundance of addresses by comparison.…




  • The big Reg STORAGE SURVEY
    From RAID to FLASH and SDS ... and more
    Tech Panel Some of you have said you want to read more on storage, so here's a survey for you to get stuck into.…


  • No longer Square: Pear-shaped payments biz seeks buyer - report
    Jack Dorsey's firm went cap-in-hand to three big tech giants, claim sources
    Square, the darling of the first-world mobile payments community, is rumoured to be looking for a saviour. Despite having despite having raised huge amounts of cash the company is running out of the stuff.…


  • Japan plans SEVEN satellite launches to supercharge GPS
    Quasi-Zenith Satellite System aims accuracy to within centimetres
    Japan is set to fire seven satellites into orbit over the coming years as part of plans to enhance GPS so locations can be pin-pointed to within centimetres rather than metres.…


  • AuDA starts final round of DNSSEC tests
    August go-live
    AuDA has taken a tentative step towards the introduction of DNSSEC into the Australian domain space, signing the .au domain in its production environment as the first step in a four-month test.…


  • APAC PC sales plummet 11 per cent after political upheaval
    Election time forces EIGHTH consecutive quarterly decline
    Global PC growth engine APAC suffered a record eighth consecutive quarterly decline in the first three months of 2014 thanks to political upheaval in the region and the continued popularity of smartphones and tablets, according to IDC.…


  • [NSFW] Pirate Bay's 10 millionth upload: Colour us shocked, a SMUT FLICK
    P2P badboys show online piracy is alive and humping
    NSFW The Pirate Bay has hit a historic milestone after celebrating its 10 millionth upload. However, the auspiciousness of the occasion was dampened slightly by the fact the content in question was a pirated copy of a smut film from the "Intimate Lesbians" series.…


  • Researchers slurp unencrypted Viber messaging data with ease
    Images, videos, location and other data easily exposed, they claim
    Popular Whatsapp-like messaging service Viber is exposing users to man-in-the-middle and other attacks because it isn’t encrypting various data at rest and in transit, security researchers have warned.…


  • Oz Ombudsman calls for wiretap oversight
    Sniffs at poison chalice
    With both political parties and most law enforcement agencies devoted to implementing more data retention in Australia's Internet, the Commonwealth Ombudsman has suggested it could have a role in overseeing such a regime.…



  • Cisco: Hey, IT depts. You're all malware hosts
    Security report also notes skills shortage
    Everybody – at least every multinational that Cisco checked out for its 2014 Annual Security Report – is hosting malware of some kind, and there aren't enough security professionals to go around.…


  • RIP net neutrality? FCC boss mulls 'two-speed internet'
    Financial fast track to replace level competitive playing field, report claims
    US Federal Communications Commission (FCC) chairman Tom Wheeler has had a major change of heart when it comes to net neutrality, it's reported.…


  • Cross-border kids used as Easter iPhone MULES in China
    HK schoolkids loaded up with handsets, sent back to Shenzhen
    Cross-border school kids as young as 10-years-old are being used as mules to smuggle iPhones and other electronic gadgetry from Hong Kong into China where they can be sold at a premium.…




  • Amazon loads Docker app containerization into its cloud
    Virtualization's likely successor gets another boost
    Although admins have been free to run Linux containerization technology Docker on top of Amazon Linux running on its rentable EC2 servers for some time, the company on Thursday announced that Docker had been integrated with Elastic Beanstalk.…




  • OnePlus One equals 'killer' new mobe running CyanogenMod
    But it's invites-only for now, and you might also need a hammer
    Vid After months of teasing, Chinese smartphone startup OnePlus has formally launched the OnePlus One, a budget Android handset with specs so enticing that some industry watchers had suspected it of being vaporware.…


  • Apple's strong iPhone sales crush Wall Street moneymen's tepid expectations
    Plans seven-for-one stock split, $130bn capital return
    Despite not introducing any significant new products during the second quarter of its fiscal 2014 ended in March, Apple has announced unexpectedly healthy revenues and profits for the quarter, with the all-important earnings per share numbers crushing analysts' expectations.…



  • Google adds a sense of history to Street View with archive footage
    Visual 'Wayback Machine' covers 2007 to the present
    Google is adding historical images to its Street View image library so that users can step backwards and forwards through time and track development from when the Chocolate Factory cameras cars last rolled by.…


  • IBM rides nightmarish hardware landscape on OpenPOWER Consortium raft
    Google mulls 'third-generation of warehouse-scale computing' on Big Blue's open chips
    IBM is going to ride out the storm rippling through the hardware industry by donating one of its crown jewels to a consortium of partner companies with the hope it can make a bit of cash off the ensuing sales.…



Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM