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  • Mandriva: 2014:202: php
    LinuxSecurity.com: A vulnerability has been discovered and corrected in php:A heap corruption issue was reported in PHP's exif_thumbnail()function. A specially-crafted JPEG image could cause the PHPinterpreter to crash or, potentially, execute arbitrary code[More...]








  • Red Hat: 2014:1686-01: openstack-neutron: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated openstack-neutron packages that fix one security issue and several bugs are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 4.0. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Moderate security [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:1685-01: openstack-glance: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated openstack-glance packages that fix one security issue and several bugs are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux OpenStack Platform 4.0. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Moderate security [More...]



  • Red Hat: 2014:1677-01: wireshark: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated wireshark packages that fix multiple security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Moderate security [More...]


  • Red Hat: 2014:1676-01: wireshark: Moderate Advisory
    LinuxSecurity.com: Updated wireshark packages that fix multiple security issues are now available for Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 and 7. Red Hat Product Security has rated this update as having Moderate security [More...]



  • We would like to thank the Zorin OS team
    On behalf of the neighbourhood council, we would like to thank the Zorin OS team for their commitment on an extraordinary software that we hope will be going strong for years to come.


  • Tiny Android SBC taps quad-core A31s SoC
    Boardcon launched a 92 x 65mm “Compact A31S” SBC that runs Android 4.2.2 on a quad-core Allwinner A31s SoC backed up with 2GB of soldered RAM and 4GB flash.



  • Ubuntu 14.10 tries pulling a Steve Ballmer on cloudy offerings
    Proprietary clouds in particular come from Microsoft, Google and Amazon, while open-source cloud offerings are provided by OpenStack. On OpenStack, it’s the 1990s Linux time again, only this time around tech firms are slapping their badges on the OpenStack APIs instead and selling support to go with them.



  • How to install a CentOS 7 minimal server
    This document describes the installation of CentOS 7 Server with a basic minimal installation. The purpose of this guide is to provide a minimal setup that can be used as basis for our other tutoruials here at howtoforge


  • Quick Look: Ubuntu 14.10
    Ubuntu 14.10 is the latest version of Canonical’s iconic desktop operating system. This time around the focus is on application updates, as well as maintenance and stability improvements. The Linux kernel has been updated to 3.16, and most applications have been updated as well.



  • LXLE 14.04.1 & 12.04.5 released.
    The official release of the incremental update to LXLE 14.04 and 12.04.4 has undergone minor changes and a few bug fixes which is as follows:


  • OpenShift V3 Deep Dive Tutorial
    If you can run your application in a Docker container, you can run it in OpenShift v3. This posts looks at what you can do with code that’s available today. We'll walk through the setting up OpenShift and deploying a simple application. Along the way, I’ll explain some details of the underlying components that make it all work.


  • OpenStack for humanitys fast moving technology
    OpenStack has presented a huge opportunity for technologists at many levels. Niki Acosta is one of those technologists who strives to pull together all aspects of the OpenStack community for the betterment of everyone. Niki is the Director of Cloud Evangelism at Metacloud, now a part of Cisco. Metacloud delivers private infrastructure as a service based on the popular and open source cloud platform, OpenStack. As an active OpenStack participant, tweeter, and blogger, she has become a recognized name in the cloud industry. Find out more in my interview with Niki.


  • Red Hat offers OpenStack training and exams in Paris
    Are you attending the OpenStack Summit in Paris? OpenStack Summit Paris is a five-day conference for OpenStack software users, developers and administrators, with a main conference encompassing keynotes from leading figures in the OpenStack community and a design summit focused around collaborative working sessions


  • Quick PHP patch beats slow research reveal
    Patches have been flung out to cover vulnerabilities in PHP that led to remote code execution and buffer overflows. The flaws were detailed this week by Swiss researchers High-Tech Bridge in versions 5.4.33, 5.5.17 and 5.6.1 on a machine running Ubuntu 14.04.1 LTS and the Radamsa fuzzer.



  • Why open data matters in education
    Rajan attends a school in a small village located around 140 kilometers from my hometown of Amritsar, India. Otherwise an active boy who is adept in handling numbers in the ledger book at his father’s convenience store and who loves playing flute, he falls into the depths of apathy and indifference the moment he enters his classroom. Rajan is not at fault for the abrupt change in his behavior at the school. He attends a school that has one teacher for all its students from classes starting from the first standard through the fifth standard, that has no proper infrastructure, a dilapidated library, and an obsolete teaching methodology.




  • Top 3 open source alternatives to Google Analytics
    If you have a website or an online business, collecting data on where your visitors or customers come from, where they land on your site, and where they leave is vital. Why? Having that information can help you better target your products and services, and beef up the pages that are turning people away.The way to gather that kind of information is with a web analytics tool.Many people and businesses (of all sizes) turn to Google Analytics. But if you want to keep control of your data, then you’ll want a tool that you have control over. You don’t get that from Google Analytics, and luckily Google Analytics isn’t the only game on the web.Let’s take a look at three open source alternatives to Google Analytics.read more



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  • Old Masters
    After 80, some people don’t retire. They reign.




  • How Music Can Boost A High-Intensity Workout
    An encouraging new study suggests that listening to music makes strenuous workouts feel easier and may nudge people into pushing themselves harder than they had thought possible.





  • How To Save Your Smartphone's Battery Life
    This interactive guide shows you how to make the most of your phone's ​battery life. Just choose the make and model of your phone from the drop-down menu and learn how to stay juiced.


  • The Exact Wrong Way To Ride The Subway
    The only thing he got right was having headphones in, just in case there were mariachi bands outside the train too. And in case you need reminding: Please, please do not attempt this stunt yourself.







  • The Unforgiving Economy Of Rural Appalachia
    Nearly 30 percent of all residents live below the poverty level. The per capita income is just more than $16,000. The unemployment rate is 13 percent. Welcome to East Liverpool, Ohio.







  • The Oldest Statue In The World
    The Shigir Idol is oldest wooden statue in the world, estimated as having been constructed approximately 9,500 years ago, and preserved in a peat bog on the western fringe of Siberia.


  • Can William Gibson Predict The Future?
    He coined the term "cyberspace" before we even knew cyberspace existed. He imagined reality TV years before it was everywhere. And while William Gibson insists that he's the last guy to know what's coming next, predictions he made decades ago keep coming true. Which is a little alarming, actually. Because his new novel is his most dire yet.


  • Lumosity's Brain Games Are Bullshit
    Recently, a coalition of nearly 70 researchers spoke against Lumosity, signing a letter of consensus posted by the Stanford Longevity Center that lambasted the brain training community for promising a kind of mind power boost that just isn't provable.


  • The Man Who Invented The Republican Internet
    Vincent Harris presents as a well-heeled Austin hipster, and some of the things that come out of his mouth — he can’t stand Fox News, for instance — make him seem almost... Democratic. Now Harris is involved in the seemingly oxymoronic activity of coolifying Mitch McConnell. Along the way, he’s issued some very public critiques of the way the rest of the GOP relates to tech, and to millennials.
















  • Ello Raises $5.5 Million
    After raising the money, the company plans on adopting a legally binding charter that would forbid it from "using ads or selling user data to make money."




  • Paula Deen's Restaurant Runs Vaguely Racist Ad
    A recent advertisement for Lady & Sons, the restaurant Deen owns in Savannah, Georgia, features a "mammy figure." The advertisement is meant to notify patrons of the restaurant's new hours of operation.



  • Are You Cool Enough To Drink Switchel?
    Deep in the industrial heart of Bushwick, Brooklyn, a few miles north of the neighborhood's main drag, are several rows of former warehouses, now home to local craftsmen. And on the second floor of one former factory, two friends are brewing large batches of switchel, a colonial farm drink that's fast becoming the borough's hottest beverage.




  • This Is What Your Body Is Worth
    You, dear reader, are worth about $2.5 million — that’s the good news.  But now you have a price tag on your back — that’s the bad news.


  • Generating Sparks From Falling Water
    The physics behind Kelvin's Thunderstorm explained. No, it is not a practical way of generating electricity, which is why we use turbines at hydro stations.



  • The Mystery Of The Disappearing Silk Road Murder Charges
    The bust of the Silk Road was headline news around the world, but it was the FBI’s claims that alleged Silk Road kingpin Ross Ulbricht carried out six shocking murder-for-hire plots against staff, vendors, and innocent bystanders — not to mention a brutal torture allegation — that seemed to seal his fate in the eyes of the public. So, where are those murder charges now?


  • The Laborers Who Keep Dick Pics And Beheadings Out Of Your Facebook Feed
    The campuses of the tech industry are famous for their lavish cafeterias, cushy shuttles and on-site laundry services. But on a muggy February afternoon, some of these companies’ most important work is being done 7,000 miles away, on the second floor of a former elementary school at the end of a row of auto mechanics’ stalls in Bacoor, a gritty Filipino town 13 miles southwest of Manila.


  • Incapacitating Chemical Agents: Coming Soon To Local Law Enforcement?
    Lasrick writes To this day, Russian authorities refuse to disclose the incapacitating chemical agent (ICA) they employed in their attempt, 12 years ago, to save 900 hostages held in a theater by Chechen fighters. Malcom Dando elaborates on a new report (PDF) that Russia, China, Israel, and a slew of other countries are continuing research into ICAs, and the apparent indifference of the international community into such research. Proponents of ICAs have long promoted their use in a variety of scenarios, including that of law enforcement, because in theory these chemicals incapacitate without permanent disability. Critics, however, point out that these weapons rely on exact dosage to prevent fatality, and that the ability to 'deliver the right agent to the right people in the right dose without exposing the wrong people, or delivering the wrong dose' is a near-impossible expectation. ICAs represent the further misuse and militarization of the life sciences and a weakening of the taboo against the weaponization of toxic substances, and the idea that they could be used in law enforcement situations is a disturbing one."







  • NY Doctor Recently Back From West Africa Tests Positive For Ebola
    An anonymous reader writes An emergency room doctor who recently returned to the city after treating Ebola patients in West Africa has tested positive for the virus, Mayor Bill de Blasio said. It's the first case in the city and the fourth in the nation. From the article: "The doctor, identified as Craig Spencer, 33, came back from treating Ebola patients in Guinea about 10 days ago, and developed a fever, nausea, pain and fatigue Wednesday night. The physician, employed at New York's Columbia Presbyterian Hospital, has been in isolation at Bellevue Hospital in Manhattan since Thursday morning, the official said."







  • Tracking a Bitcoin Thief
    An anonymous reader writes A small group of researchers were able to publish an investigative report on the hacking of a popular Bitcoin exchange earlier this year by the name of CryptoRush.in. Close to a million dollars stolen in crypto currency lead the group to discover evidence, track down the attacker and put together a timeline of what exactly happened. A captivating read for a community desensitized by thefts, hackings and lack of reporting. With pictures, and logs to prove it all.







  • How Sony, Intel, and Unix Made Apple's Mac a PC Competitor
    smaxp writes In 2007, Sony's supply chain lessons, the network effect from the shift to Intel architecture, and a better OS X for developers combined to renew the Mac's growth. The network effects of the Microsoft Wintel ecosystem that Rappaport explained 20 years ago in the Harvard Business Review are no longer a big advantage. By turning itself into a premium PC company with a proprietary OS, Apple has taken the best of PC ecosystem, but avoided taking on the disadvantages.







  • SMART Begins Live Public Robocar Tests In Singapore
    Hallie Siegel writes Robocar R&D is moving fast in Singapore, and this week, the National University of Singapore (NUS) announced they will be doing a live public demo of their autonomous golf carts over a course with 10 stops in the Singapore Chinese and Japanese Gardens. The public will be able to book rides online, and then summon and direct the vehicles with their phones. The vehicles will have a touch tablet where the steering wheel will go. Rides will be free, and will take place Oct. 23-25, Oct. 30-31 and Nov. 1.







  • Microsoft Exec Opens Up About Research Lab Closure, Layoffs
    alphadogg writes It's been a bit over a month since Microsoft shuttered its Microsoft Research lab in Silicon Valley as part of the company's broader restructuring that will include 18,000 layoffs. This week, Harry Shum, Microsoft EVP of Technology & Research, posted what he termed an "open letter to the academic research community" on the company's research blog. In the post, Shum is suitably contrite about the painful job cut decisions that were made in closing the lab, which opened in 2001. He also stresses that Microsoft will continue to invest in and value "fundamental research".







  • Tech Firm Fined For Paying Imported Workers $1.21 Per Hour
    An anonymous reader sends in news about a company that was fined for flying in "about eight employees" from India to work 120-hour weeks for $1.21 per hour. Electronics for Imaging paid several employees from India as little as $1.21 an hour to help install computer systems at the company's Fremont headquarters, federal labor officials said Wednesday. "We are not going to tolerate this kind of behavior from employers," said Susana Blanco, district director of the U.S. Labor Department's wage and hour division in San Francisco.... An anonymous tip prompted the U.S. Department of Labor to investigate the case, which resulted in more than $40,000 in back wages paid to the eight employees and a fine of $3,500 for Electronics for Imaging.







  • Mark Zuckerberg Speaks Mandarin At Tsinghua University In Beijing
    HughPickens.com writes Abby Phillip reports at the Washington Post that that Mark Zuckerberg just posted a 30-minute Q&A at Tsinghua University in Beijing in which he answered every question exclusively in Chinese — a notoriously difficult language to learn and particularly, to speak. "It isn't just Zuckerberg's linguistic acrobatics that make this a notable moment," writes Philip. "This small gesture — although some would argue that it is a huge moment — is perhaps his strongest foray into the battle for hearts and minds in China." Zuckerberg and Facebook have been aggressively courting Chinese users for years and the potential financial upside for the business. Although Beijing has mostly banned Facebook, the company signed a contract for its first ever office in China earlier this year. A Westerner speaking Mandarin in China — at any level — tends to elicit joy from average Chinese, who seem to appreciate the effort and respect they feel learning Mandarin demonstrates. So how well did he actually do? One Mandarin speaker rates Zuckerberg's language skills at a seventh grader's speech: "It's hard not see a patronizing note in the Chinese audience's reaction to Zuckerberg's Mandarin. To borrow from Samuel Johnson's quip, he was like a dog walking on its hind legs: It wasn't done well, but it was a surprise to see it done at all."







  • Assange: Google Is Not What It Seems
    oxide7 (1013325) writes "In June 2011, Julian Assange received an unusual visitor: the chairman of Google, Eric Schmidt. They outlined radically opposing perspectives: for Assange, the liberating power of the Internet is based on its freedom and statelessness. For Schmidt, emancipation is at one with U.S. foreign policy objectives and is driven by connecting non-Western countries to Western companies and markets. These differences embodied a tug-of-war over the Internet's future that has only gathered force subsequently. Assange describes his encounter with Schmidt and how he came to conclude that it was far from an innocent exchange of views."







  • Leaked Documents Reveal Behind-the-Scenes Ebola Vaccine Issues
    sciencehabit writes Extensive background documents from a meeting that took place today at the World Health Organization (WHO) have provided new details about exactly what it will take to test, produce, and bankroll Ebola vaccines, which could be a potential game changer in the epidemic. ScienceInsider obtained materials that vaccinemakers, governments, and WHO provided to the 100 or so participants at a meeting on 'access and financing' of Ebola vaccines. The documents put hard numbers on what until now have been somewhat fuzzy academic discussions. And they make clear to the attendees—who include representatives from governments, industry, philanthropies, and nongovernmental organizations—that although testing and production are moving forward at record speed, knotty issues remain.







  • Ubuntu 14.10 Released With Ambitious Name, But Small Changes
    Ubuntu 14.10, dubbed Utopic Unicorn, has been released today (here are screenshots). PC World says that at first glance "isn't the most exciting update," with not so much as a new default wallpaper — but happily so: it's a stable update in a stable series, and most users will have no pressing need to update to the newest version. In the Ubuntu Next unstable series, though, there are big changes afoot: Along with Mir comes the next version of Ubuntu’s Unity desktop, Unity 8. Mir and the latest version of Unity are already used on Ubuntu Phone, so this is key for Ubuntu's goal of convergent computing — Ubuntu Phone and Ubuntu desktop will use the same display server and desktop shell. Ubuntu Phone is now stable and Ubuntu phones are arriving this year, so a lot of work has gone into this stuff recently. The road ahead looks bumpy however. Ubuntu needs to get graphics drivers supporting Mir properly. The task becomes more complicated when you consider that other Linux distributions — like Fedora — are switching to the Wayland display server instead of Mir. When Ubuntu Desktop Next becomes the standard desktop environment, the changes will be massive indeed. But for today, Utopic Unicorn is all about subtle improvements and slow, steady iteration.







  • German Publishers Capitulate, Let Google Post News Snippets
    itwbennett writes German publishers said they are bowing to Google's market power, and will allow the search engine to show news snippets in search results free of charge — at least for the time being. The decision is a step in an ongoing legal dispute between the publishers and Google in which, predictably, publishers are trying to get compensation from the search engine for republishing parts of their content and Google isn't interested in sharing revenue. The move follows a Google decision earlier this month — and which was to go into effect today — to stop using news snippets and thumbnails for some well-known German news sites.







  • We Need Distributed Social Networks More Than Ello
    Frequent contributor Bennett Haselton writes: Facebook threatened to banish drag queen pseudonyms, and (some) users revolted by flocking to Ello, a social network which promised not to enforce real names and also to remain ad-free. Critics said that the idealistic model would buckle under pressure from venture capitalists. But both gave scant mention to the fact that a distributed social networking protocol, backed by a player large enough to get people using it, would achieve all of the goals that Ello aspired to achieve, and more. Read on for the rest.







  • We Need Distributed Social Networks More Than Ello
    Frequent contributor Bennett Haselton writes: Facebook threatened to banish drag queen pseudonyms, and (some) users revolted by flocking to Ello, a social network which promised not to enforce real names and also to remain ad-free. Critics said that the idealistic model would buckle under pressure from venture capitalists. But both gave scant mention to the fact that a distributed social networking protocol, backed by a player large enough to get people using it, would achieve all of the goals that Ello aspired to achieve, and more. Read on for the rest.







  • Ask Slashdot: Smarter Disk Space Monitoring In the Age of Cheap Storage?
    relliker writes In the olden days, when monitoring a file system of a few 100 MB, we would be alerted when it topped 90% or more, with 95% a lot of times considered quite critical. Today, however, with a lot of file systems in the Terabyte range, a 90-95% full file system can still have a considerable amount of free space but we still mostly get bugged by the same alerts as in the days of yore when there really isn't a cause for immediate concern. Apart from increasing thresholds and/or starting to monitor actual free space left instead of a percentage, should it be time for monitoring systems to become a bit more intelligent by taking space usage trends and heuristics into account too and only warn about critical usage when projected thresholds are exceeded? I'd like my system to warn me with something like, 'Hey!, you'll be running out of space in a couple of months if you go on like this!' Or is this already the norm and I'm still living in a digital cave? What do you use, on what operating system?







  • Austin Airport Tracks Cell Phones To Measure Security Line Wait
    jfruh writes If you get into the TSA security line at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport, you'll see monitors telling you how long your wait will be — and if you have a phone with Wi-Fi enabled, you're helping the airport come up with that number. A system implemented by Cisco tracks the MAC addresses of phones searching for Wi-Fi networks and sees how long it takes those phones to traverse the line, giving a sense of how quickly things are moving. While this is useful information to have, the privacy implications are a bit unsettling.







  • Apple 1 Sells At Auction For $905,000
    Dave Knott writes One of the few remaining examples of Apple Inc's first pre-assembled computer, the Apple 1, sold for $905,000 at an auction in New York on Wednesday. The final price outstrips expectations, as auction house Bonhams had said it expected to sell the machine, which was working as of September, for between $300,000 and $500,000. The buyer was The Henry Ford organization, which plans to display the computer in its museum in Dearborn, Michigan. Only 63 surviving authentic Apple 1's were listed in an Apple 1 Registry as of January out of the 200 that were built. The auctioned computer is thought to be one of the first batch of 50 Apple-1 machines assembled by Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak in Steve Job's family garage in Los Altos, California in the summer of 1976. It is also believed to be one of only 15 that still have functioning motherboards. That's a bit more beastly than the original price.







  • Ello Formally Promises To Remain Ad-Free, Raises $5.5M
    Social media site Ello is presented as the anti-Facebook, promising an ad-free social network, and that they won't sell private data. Today, they've also announced that Ello has become a Public Benefit Corporation, and that the site's anti-advertising promise has been enshrined in a corporate charter. The BBC reports on the restrictions that Ello has therefore entered into, which mean the site cannot, for monetary gain, Sell user-specific data to a third party Enter into an agreement to display paid advertising on behalf of a third party; and In the event of an acquisition or asset transfer, the Company shall require any acquiring entity to adopt these requirements with respect to the operation of Ello or its assets. While that might turn off some potential revenue flows (the company says it will make money by selling optional features), as the linked article points out, it hasn't turned off investors; Ello has now raised $5.5 million from investors.







  • Cisco Fixes Three-Year-Old Telnet Flaw In Security Appliances
    Trailrunner7 writes "There is a severe remote code execution vulnerability in a number of Cisco's security appliances, a bug that was first disclosed nearly three years ago. The vulnerability is in Telnet and there has been a Metasploit module available to exploit it for years. The FreeBSD Project first disclosed the vulnerability in telnet in December 2011 and it was widely publicized at the time. Recently, Glafkos Charalambous, a security researcher, discovered that the bug was still present in several of Cisco's security boxes, including the Web Security Appliance, Email Security Appliance and Content Security Management Appliance. The vulnerability is in the AsyncOS software in those appliances and affects all versions of the products." At long last, though, as the article points out, "Cisco has released a patched version of the AsyncOS software to address the vulnerability and also has recommended some workarounds for customers."







  • Sale of IBM's Chip-Making Business To GlobalFoundries To Get US Security Review
    dcblogs writes IBM is an officially sanctioned trusted supplier to the U.S. Defense Dept., and the transfer of its semiconductor manufacturing to GlobalFoundries, a U.S.-based firm owned by investors in Abu Dhabi, will get U.S. scrutiny. Retired U.S. Army Brig. Gen. John Adams, who authored a report last year for an industry group about U.S. supply chain vulnerabilities and national security, said regulators will have to look closely. "I don't want cast aspersions unnecessarily on Abu Dubai — but they're not Canada," said Adams "I think that the news that we may be selling part of our supply chain for semiconductors to a foreign investor is actually bad news."







  • Proposed Penalty For UK Hackers Who "Damage National Security": Life
    An anonymous reader writes with this excerpt from The Guardian: Government plans that mean computer users deemed to have damaged national security, the economy or the environment will face a life sentence have been criticised by experts who warn that the new law could be used to target legitimate whistleblowers. The proposed legislation would mean that any British person deemed to have carried out an unauthorised act on a computer that resulted in damage to human welfare, the environment, the economy or national security in any country would face a possible life sentence. Last week the Joint Committee on Human Rights raised concerns about the proposals and the scope of such legislation.







  • The Inevitable Death of the Internet Troll
    HughPickens.com writes James Swearingen writes at The Atlantic that the Internet can be a mean, hateful, and frightening place — especially for young women but human behavior and the limits placed on it by both law and society can change. In a Pew Research Center survey of 2,849 Internet users, one out of every four women between 18 years old and 24 years old reports having been stalked or sexually harassed online. "Like banner ads and spam bots, online harassment is still routinely treated as part of the landscape of being online," writes Swearingen adding that "we are in the early days of online harassment being taken as a serious problem, and not simply a quirk of online life." Law professor Danielle Citron draws a parallel between how sexual harassment was treated in the workplace decades ago and our current standard. "Think about in the 1960s and 1970s, what we said to women in the workplace," says Citron. "'This is just flirting.' That a sexually hostile environment was just a perk for men to enjoy, it's just what the environment is like. If you don't like it, leave and get a new job." It took years of activism, court cases, and Title VII protection to change that. "Here we are today, and sexual harassment in the workplace is not normal," said Citron. "Our norms and how we understand it are different now." According to Swearingen, the likely solution to internet trolls will be a combination of things. The expansion of laws like the one currently on the books in California, which expands what constitutes online harassment, could help put the pressure on harassers. The upcoming Supreme Court case, Elonis v. The United States, looks to test the limits of free speech versus threatening comments on Facebook. "Can a combination of legal action, market pressure, and societal taboo work together to curb harassment?" asks Swearingen. "Too many people do too much online for things to stay the way they are."







  • Machine Learning Expert Michael Jordan On the Delusions of Big Data
    First time accepted submitter agent elevator writes In a wide-ranging interview at IEEE Spectrum, Michael I. Jordan skewers a bunch of sacred cows, basically saying that: The overeager adoption of big data is likely to result in catastrophes of analysis comparable to a national epidemic of collapsing bridges. Hardware designers creating chips based on the human brain are engaged in a faith-based undertaking likely to prove a fool's errand; and despite recent claims to the contrary, we are no further along with computer vision than we were with physics when Isaac Newton sat under his apple tree.







  • U.K. Supermarkets Beta Test Full-Body 3D Scanners For Selfie Figurines
    Lucas123 writes Walmart-owned ASDA supermarkets in the U.K. are beta testing 3D full-body scanning booths that allow patrons to buy 6-in to 9-in high "selfie" figurines. Artec Group, a maker of 3D scanners and software, said its Shapify Booth, which can scan your entire body in 12 seconds and use the resulting file to create a full-color 3D printed model, is making its U.S. debut this week. The 3D Shapify booths are equipped with four wide view, high-resolution scanners, which rotate around the person to scan every angle. Artec claims the high-powered scan and precision printing is able to capture even the smallest details, down to the wrinkles on clothes. The scanning process generates 700 captured surfaces, which are automatically stitched together to produce an electronic file ready for 3D printing. Artec offers to print the figurines for booth operators (retailers) for $50 for a 6-in model, $70 for a 7.5-in model, and $100 for a 9-in figurine.







  • New Microsoft Garage Site Invites Public To Test a Wide Range of App Ideas
    An anonymous reader writes Microsoft today launched a new section on its website: The Microsoft Garage is designed to give the public early access to various projects the company is testing right now. The team is kicking off with a total of 16 free consumer-facing apps, spanning Android, Android Wear, iOS, Windows Phone, Windows, and even the Xbox One. Microsoft Garage is still going to be everything it has been so far, but Microsoft has simply decided it's time for the public to get involved too: You can now test the wild projects the company's employees dream up.







  • WIN a 1TB monster Samsung EVO 840 SSD
    Three solid state scorchers up for grabs
    Competition SSDs, doncha love ’em? Blisteringly fast and no mechanical parts but all too often you’re faced with a capacity compromise. Big SSDs can be expensive but think big and think free because you could be the lucky winner of one of three 1TB Samsung SSD 840 EVO drives that are worth over £300 apiece.…




  • Rackspace launches big red rack eater
    RackConnect 3.0 release gives Rackspace a much better hybrid cloud story
    Rackspace has flicked the switch on the third version of its RackConnect hybrid cloud-maker.…


  • Adorkable overshare of words like photobomb in this year's dictionaries
    And hipsters are finally defined as self-loathing. Sort of
    Adorkable, photobomb, overshare, Tinder. What do these words have in common? Apart from being ridiculous portmanteaus and brand names that have made their way into common usage, they’re also words that will feature in this year’s new dictionaries.…



  • 'Careful management of headcount' for Juniper after tepid quarter
    Translation: the razor's swinging, at customers and in Juniper's back office
    Juniper Networks has reported a difficult third quarter that left CEO Shaygan Kheradpir “disappointed” by “lower-than-anticipated demand from service providers, particularly in the U.S.”…




  • Aereo tellyscraper cops fresh licking in US courts
    Streaming startup barred from showing live TV streams
    Embattled TV biz Aereo was dealt a stunning blow on Thursday when a US judge barred the service from streaming live television over the internet.…




  • Moscow, Beijing poised to sign deal on joint cyber security ops
    Russian, Chinese security projects on the horizon
    Moscow and Beijing will next month sign a deal to commence joint information security projects and operations, and to increase cooperation in the space, according to a popular Russian newspaper with ties to President Vladimir Putin.…


  • Jeff Bezos rolls up another $437m, lights Amazon's cigar with it
    Another lossmaking quarter despite sales of over $20bn
    It's not black magic that Amazon works on its financial results each quarter but red magic – because however massive a haul of cash the company pulls in, it just can't seem to turn a profit. Odd, that.…


  • Facebook, IBM, court future Chinese elite
    Zuckerberg and Rometty join advisory board of top business school
    Beijing's Tsinghua University School of Economics and Management has signed up two tech titans to its advisory board: Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg and IBM President and CEO Ginni Rometty.…






  • Apple: We're still GREAT pals with GT and we'd LOVE to team up again
    But give us back our $439m
    Apple hasn't given up on scratch-resistant sapphire glass for future products and it might even continue to work with GT Advanced Technologies on the material despite its past difficulties with the company, according to documents released on Thursday.…




  • Upstart brags about cheaper-than-Amazon private cold data cloud
    Storiant man asks you to check out their racks
    Storiant is an object storage startup which claims its customers can use its technology to store petabyte-scale data in a private cloud at a price below public cloud storage. How does it pull this trick off?…


  • Google Glassholes are UNDATEABLE – HP exec
    You need an emotional connection, says touchy-feely MD... We can do that
    Hoping to woo the ladies with your shiny new Google Glass? Don't bother, because no woman in her right mind would let a Glasshole anywhere near her data centre, an HP bigwig has claimed.…







  • Ad-borne Cryptowall ransomware is set to claim FRESH VICTIMS
    Cybercrooks slurping hundreds of thousands from innocent marks, say securo-bods
    Security watchers are warning of a surge in CryptoWall ransomware victims this month that will coincide with a campaign to spread a new variant of the malware though advertising networks.…











  • The future health of the internet comes down to ONE simple question…
    Can ICANN be forced to agree to oversight of its decisions?
    Analysis When was the last time you gave any thought to how the internet actually works? Despite the extraordinary and never-ending growth in people and devices that connect to the internet every second of every day, we have never seen the equivalent of Twitter’s Fail Whale. The internet, as a whole, just doesn’t go down.…


  • Flash! Ah-ahh: Storage in 2014
    Join us in the Reg Studios on 27 November
    Register now to watch our webcast that explores the benefits of cheaper Flash Storage in 2014 — How do you buy, configure and manage it?…


  • Vulture trails claw across Lenovo's touchy N20p Chromebook
    The Googlebook you can fondle
    Review A friend recently introduced me to a North West fast-food tradition called half-and-half. That’s chips, rice and curry sauce to those of us born and raised in the more enlightened parts of the realm. It’s not a combination I’d considered before, but truth be told it’s a pleasant repast. Especially after a beer or three.…







  • NIST to hypervisor admins: Pro-tip, secure your systems
    Hypervisor security draft open for comment
    US standards body the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has laid out the basics of hypervisor security in a draft publication released for comment on 20 October.…



  • NBN Co reports fibre traction and Telstra action
    FTTP services breach the not-very-magical 200,000 barrier
    NBN Co has made the slightly awkward announcement that it's more than tripled the number of premises connected to its fibre network in the past year, while maintaining its commitment to the multi-technology model for future rollouts.…


Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 04:59 PM