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  • Fedora 25: krb5 Security Update
    LinuxSecurity.com: - Prevent applications from accidentally implementing CVE-2017-11462 (double free if sec_context is copied). - fc26+: Add ccselect hostrealm module for ccache selection based on service hostname.


  • Fedora 26: httpd Security Update
    LinuxSecurity.com: This is a release fixing a security fix applied upstream, known as "optionsbleed" in popular parlance. It is relevant for hosted and co-located instances of Fedora (and why wouldn't you?).




  • SuSE: 2017:2552-1: important: spice
    LinuxSecurity.com: An update that fixes one vulnerability is now available. An update that fixes one vulnerability is now available. An update that fixes one vulnerability is now available.


  • Fedora 25: kernel Security Update
    LinuxSecurity.com: The 4.12.13 stable kernel update contains a number of important fixes across the tree. ---- The 4.12.12 stable kernel update contains a number of important fixes across the tree.




  • GitLab 10.0 Released
    GitLab 10.0 has been released. "With every monthly release of GitLab, we introduce new capabilities and improve our existing features. GitLab 10.0 is no exception and includes numerous new additions, such as the ability to automatically resolve outdated merge request discussions, improvements to subgroups, and an API for Wiki thanks to a contribution from our open source community."


  • Announcing Intel Clear Containers 3.0
    The Clear Containers team at Intel has announcedthe release of Clear Containers 3.0. "Completely rewritten and refactored, Clear Containers 3.0 uses Go language instead of C and introduces many new components and features. The 3.0 release of Clear Containers brings better integration into the container ecosystem and an ability to leverage code used for namespace based containers."


  • Facebook relicenses several projects
    Facebook has announcedthat the React, Jest, Flow, and Immutable.js projects will be moving to theMIT license. This is, of course, a somewhat delayed reaction to the controversy over the "BSD+patent" licensepreviously applied to those projects. "This decision comes afterseveral weeks of disappointment and uncertainty for our community. Althoughwe still believe our BSD + Patents license provides some benefits to usersof our projects, we acknowledge that we failed to decisively convince thiscommunity."


  • Samba 4.7.0 released
    The Samba 4.7.0 release is out. New features include whole DB read locks(a reliability improvement), active directory with Kerberos support,detailed audit trails for authentication and authorization activities, amulti-process LDAP server, better read-only domain controller support, andmore. See the releasenotes for details.


  • Security updates for Friday
    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (augeas, samba, and samba4), Debian (apache2, bluez, emacs23, and newsbeuter), Fedora (kernel and mingw-LibRaw), openSUSE (apache2 and libzip), Oracle (kernel), SUSE (kernel, spice, and xen), and Ubuntu (emacs24, emacs25, and samba).


  • [$] Notes from the LPC tracing microconference
    The "tracing and BPF" microconference was held on the final day of the 2017Linux Plumbers Conference; it covered a number of topics relevant to heavyusers of kernel and user-space tracing. Read on for a summary of a numberof those discussions on topics like BPF introspection, stack traces,kprobes, uprobes, and the Common Trace Format.


  • Security updates for Thursday
    Security updates have been issued by Arch Linux (tomcat7), Debian (kernel and perl), Fedora (libwmf and mpg123), Mageia (bluez, ffmpeg, gstreamer0.10-plugins-good, gstreamer1.0-plugins-good, libwmf, tomcat, and tor), openSUSE (emacs, fossil, freexl, php5, and xen), Red Hat (augeas, rh-mysql56-mysql, samba, and samba4), Scientific Linux (augeas, samba, and samba4), Slackware (samba), SUSE (emacs and kernel), and Ubuntu (qemu).


  • Red Hat's new patent promise
    Red Hat has announced anupdate to itspatent promise, wherein the company says it will not enforce itspatents against anybody who might be infringing them with open-sourcesoftware. The new version expands the promise to all software covered byan OSI-approved license, including permissive licenses. The attached FAQnotes that Red Hat now possesses over 2,000 patents.



  • [$] Linking commits to reviews
    In a talk in the refereed track of the 2017 Linux Plumbers Conference,Alexandre Courouble presented the email2git tool thatlinks kernel commits to their review discussion on the mailing lists. Email2gitis a plugin for cregit, which implements token-level history for a Git repository; we covered a talk on cregit just over one yearago. Email2git combines cregit with Patchwork to linkthe commit to a patch and its discussion threads from any of the mailinglists that are scanned by patchwork.kernel.org. The resultis a way to easily find the discussion that led to a piece of code—or evenjust a token—changing in the kernel source tree.


  • GNOME Foundation partners with Purism to support its efforts to build the Librem 5 smartphone
    Last week KDE announced that they wereworking with Purism on the Librem 5 smartphone. The GNOME Foundation hasalso providedits endorsement and support of Purism’s efforts to build the Librem 5."As part of the collaboration, if the campaign is successful the GNOME Foundation plans to enhance GNOME shell and general performance of the system with Purism to enable features on the Librem 5.Various GNOME technologies are used extensively in embedded devices today, and GNOME developers have experienced some of the challenges that face mobile computing specifically with the Nokia 770, N800 and N900, the One Laptop Per Child project’s XO laptop and FIC’s Neo1973 mobile phone."


  • An intro to machine learning (Opensource.com)
    Ulrich Drepper, once again an engineer at Red Hat, writesabout machine learning on opensource.com."Machine learning and artificial intelligence (ML/AI) mean differentthings to different people, but the newest approaches have one thing incommon: They are based on the idea that a program's output should becreated mostly automatically from a high-dimensional and possibly hugedataset, with minimal or no intervention or guidance from a human. Opensource tools are used in a variety of machine learning and artificialintelligence projects. In this article, I'll provide an overview of thestate of machine learning today."


  • Security updates for Wednesday
    Security updates have been issued by CentOS (emacs), Debian (apache2, gdk-pixbuf, and pyjwt), Fedora (autotrace, converseen, dmtx-utils, drawtiming, emacs, gtatool, imageinfo, ImageMagick, inkscape, jasper, k3d, kxstitch, libwpd, mingw-libzip, perl-Image-SubImageFind, pfstools, php-pecl-imagick, psiconv, q, rawtherapee, ripright, rss-glx, rubygem-rmagick, synfig, synfigstudio, techne, vdr-scraper2vdr, vips, and WindowMaker), Oracle (emacs and kernel), Red Hat (emacs and kernel), Scientific Linux (emacs), SUSE (emacs), and Ubuntu (apache2).



  • [$] Building the kernel with clang
    Over the years, there has been a persistent effort to build the Linuxkernel using the Clang C compiler that is part of the LLVM project. Welast looked in on the effort in a report fromthe LLVM microconference at the 2015 Linux Plumbers Conference (LPC), but wehave followed it before that aswell. At this year's LPC, two Google kernel engineers, Greg Hackmann andNick Desaulniers, came to the Androidmicroconference to update the status; at this point, it is possible tobuild two long-term support kernels (4.4 and 4.9) with Clang.


  • Minimal Linux Live now supports ZLIB and JDK 9
    Minimal Linux Live is a set of Linux shell scripts which automatically build minimalistic Live Linux OS with basic network support via DHCP. The generated operating system is based on Linux kernel, GNU C library and BusyBox. All necessary sources are automatically downloaded and all build operations are fully encapsulated in the shell scripts.


  • 4 must-have writing apps for Nextcloud
    If writing is part of your job or your everyday routine, you might find theNextcloudopen source file sync and share applicationa very useful tool. First, it provides you with free, secure, and easily accessible cloud file storage.read more


  • Joomla patches eight-year-old critical CMS bug
    Joomla has patched a critical bug which could be used to steal account information and fully compromise website domains. This week, the content management system (CMS) provider issued a security advisory detailing the flaw, which is found in the LDAP authentication plugin.


  • Add-on board expands i.MX6 UL SBC
    MYIR released an add-on board for its Linux-driven, i.MX6 UL-based MYS-6ULX SBC that adds a second LAN port, plus CAN, RS485, camera, audio, and RTC. In April, MYIR released a Linux-powered MYS-6ULX single board computer, which was notable for being available in two different versions using NXP’s low power, Cortex-A7 i.MX6 UltraLite (UL) or the more affordable, and almost identical i.MX6 ULL SoC.



  • MongoDB Projects $100M from IPO
    The backbone of MongoDB Inc is its NoSQL database, released as an open source project in 2009 and which began seeing considerable adoption almost immediately. Three years after the release it made a ninth place showing on The Wall Street Journal's "The Next Big Thing 2012" list and by 2014 the DB was already driving the back ends at Craigslist, eBay, SourceForge, Viacom, the New York Times and others.


  • V. Anton Spraul's Think Like a Programmer, Python Edition
    What is programming? Sure, it consists of syntax and the assembly of code,but it is essentially a means to solve problems. To study programming,then, is to study the art of problem solving, and a new book from V.Anton Spraul, Think Like a Programmer, Python Edition, is a guide tosharpening skills in both spheres.




  • Open source licensing: What every technologist should know
    If you’re a software developer today, you know how to use open source software, but do you know how and why open source licensing started? A little background will help you understand how and why the licenses work the way they do.read more



  • Join the Magazine team
    The recentFlockconference of Fedora contributors included a Fedora Magazineworkshop. Current editorial board membersRyan Lerch,Justin W. Flory, andPaul W. Frieldscovered how to join and get started as an author. Here are some highlights of the workshop and discussion that took place.... Continue Reading →


  • How to Install and Configure Askbot with Nginx on CentOS 7
    Askbot is an open source software for creating Q&A forums based on Python Django Framework. It's basically a Q&A system like StackOverflow, Yahoo Answers, and others. In this tutorial, we will show you how to install Askbot Python Django application using uWSGI and Nginx web server on CentOS 7 system.


  • Linux panel PC offers IP69K protection against jet spray
    TechNexion has launched a 10.1 inch, 1280 x 800 capacitive touch panel PC that runs Linux or Android on an i.MX6, and offers IP69K protection. TechNexion, which has long been a provider of COMs and SBCs based on Freescale/NXP i.MX SoCs, also sells a line of Linux- and Android-friendly i.MX6, i.MX6UL, and i.MX7 based panel […]




  • Kaby Lake computers include Linux-ready beast with 9x GbE ports
    Aaeon’s unveiled two rugged embedded PCs that run Intel’s 6th or 7th Gen CPUs. The Linux-friendly “BOXER-6640M” stands out with 9x GbE and 8x USB 3.0 ports. Aaeon’s BOXER-6640M and Boxer-6640 build on the same fanless design, ruggedization features, and support for 6th Gen Skylake and 7th Gen Kaby Lake processors as its recent Boxer-6639. […]





  • Memorial Set For 'Pi Day' Creator
    "Three-point-one-four was more than a number to museum curator Larry Shaw," writes the San Francisco Chronicle. Long-time Slashdot reader linuxwrangler writes: In 1988 at a retreat for San Francisco Exploratorium staff, Larry Shaw proposed linking the digits of pi, which begins 3.14, with the date March 14. Initially the "holiday" was only celebrated by museum staff but it didn't take long for the idea to spread and Pi Day was born. For 38 years, Mr. Shaw donned a red cap emblazoned with the magic digits and led a parade of museum goers, each of them holding a sign bearing one of the digits of pi. Shaw died August 19 at age 78 and a memorial is planned for Sunday September 24. The memorial will be held in Mill Valley, California, the Chronicle reports, adding that "pie will be served."
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • IBM Open Sources 'WebSphere Liberty' For Java Microservices and Cloud-Native Apps
    An anonymous reader quotes TechRepublic: On Wednesday, IBM revealed the Open Liberty project, open sourcing its WebSphere Liberty code on GitHub to support Java microservices and cloud-native apps. The company created Liberty five years ago to help developers more quickly and easily create applications using agile and DevOps principles, according to an IBM developerWorks blog post from Ian Robinson, WebSphere Foundation chief architect at IBM... Developers can also choose to move to the commercial versions of WebSphere Liberty at any time, he noted, which include technical support and more specialized features... "We hope Open Liberty will help more developers turn their ideas into full-fledged, enterprise ready apps," Robinson wrote. "We also hope it will broaden the WebSphere family to include more ideas and innovations to benefit the broader Java community of developers at organizations big and small."   IBM argues that Open Liberty, along with the OpenJ9 VM they open sourced last week, "provides the full Java stack from IBM with a fully open licensing model."  Interestingly, Slashdot ran a story asking "IBM WebSphere SE To Be Opened?" -- back in 2000.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Would a T-Mobile-Sprint Merger Hurt Consumers?
    Following a report from Reuters claiming T-Mobile is close to agreeing on a deal to merge with Sprint, an anonymous Slashdot reader shares a report from DSLReports arguing how such a merger would remain "a very bad deal for consumers": The Sprint-T-Mobile merger could prove problematic for not only wireless prices, but the recent resurgence in unlimited data plans. While wireless carriers still often engage in theatrical non-price competition more often than not, the government's decision to block AT&T's acquisition of T-Mobile several years ago helped spur an unprecedented period of competition in wireless (something large ISPs and their policy armies like to ignore). The end result was a brasher and more competitive T-Mobile, who lead the way on a wave of improvements in the sector culminating most recently in the return of simpler, easier unlimited data plans. The government's decision to block Sprint from acquiring T-Mobile helped keep that competition intact, something large ISPs and their policy folk would similarly like you to forget. As a result, T-Mobile has added more customers per quarter than any other wireless carrier for several years running, as the resulting competition put an end to numerous, nasty industry tactics including overcharging for international roaming, to obnoxious fees and long-term contracts. And while the new, combined company will likely still be run by current popular T-Mobile CEO John Legere, the very act of eliminating one of only four major players in the wireless market will indisputably reduce the incentive to more seriously compete on price, and could help reverse the progress the sector has seen in recent years. It's well within reason that this reduced competition could also bring back metered plans and put an end to unlimited data.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Apple: iPhones Are Too 'Complex' To Allow Unauthorized Repair
    Jason Koebler writes: Apple's top environmental officer made the company's most extensive statements about the repairability of Apple hardware on Tuesday: "Our first thought is, 'You don't need to repair this.' When you do, we want the repair to be fairly priced and accessible to you," Lisa Jackson, Apple's vice president of policy and social initiatives said at TechCrunch Disrupt in San Francisco. "To think about these very complex products and say the answer to all our problems is that you should have anybody to repair and have access to the parts is not looking at the whole problem." Apple has lobbied against "Fair Repair" bills in 11 states that would require the company to make its repair guides available and to sell replacement parts to the general public. Instead, it has focused on an "authorized service provider" model that allows the company to control the price and availability of repair.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Super-Accurate GPS Chips Coming To Smartphones In 2018
    schwit1 writes about a new mass-market Broadcom chip designed for the next generation of smartphones: It'll know where you are to within 30 centimeters (11.8 inches), rather than five meters. At least that's the claim chip maker Broadcom is making. It says that some of its next-generation smartphone chips will use new global positioning satellite signals to boost accuracy. In a detailed report on the announcement and how the new signals work, IEEE Spectrum says that the new chips, which are expected to appear in some phones as soon as next year, will also use half the power of today's chips and even work in cities where tower blocks often interfere with existing systems. All told, it sounds like a massive change for those who rely on their phones to find their way.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • New Antibody Attacks 99% of HIV Strains
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from BBC: Scientists have engineered an antibody that attacks 99% of HIV strains and can prevent infection in primates. It is built to attack three critical parts of the virus -- making it harder for HIV to resist its effects. The work is a collaboration between the US National Institutes of Health and the pharmaceutical company Sanofi. Our bodies struggle to fight HIV because of the virus' incredible ability to mutate and change its appearance. These varieties of HIV -- or strains -- in a single patient are comparable to those of influenza during a worldwide flu season. So the immune system finds itself in a fight against an insurmountable number of strains of HIV. But after years of infection, a small number of patients develop powerful weapons called "broadly neutralizing antibodies" that attack something fundamental to HIV and can kill large swathes of HIV strains. Researchers have been trying to use broadly neutralizing antibodies as a way to treat HIV, or prevent infection in the first place. The study, published in the journal Science, combines three such antibodies into an even more powerful "tri-specific antibody." The experiments conducted on 24 monkeys showed none of those given the tri-specific antibody developed an infection when they were later injected with the virus. "We're getting 99% coverage, and getting coverage at very low concentrations of the antibody," said Dr Gary Nabel, the chief scientific officer at Sanofi and one of the report authors.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Hackers Using iCloud's Find My iPhone Feature To Remotely Lock Macs, Demand Ransom Payments
    AmiMoJo shares a report from Mac Rumors: Over the last day or two, several Mac users appear to have been locked out of their machines after hackers signed into their iCloud accounts and initiated a remote lock using Find My iPhone. With access to an iCloud user's username and password, Find My iPhone on iCloud.com can be used to "lock" a Mac with a passcode even with two-factor authentication turned on, and that's what's going on here. Affected users who have had their iCloud accounts hacked are receiving messages demanding money for the passcode to unlock a locked Mac device. The usernames and passwords of the iCloud accounts affected by this "hack" were likely found through various site data breaches and have not been acquired through a breach of Apple's servers. Impacted users likely used the same email addresses, account names, and passwords for multiple accounts, allowing people with malicious intent to figure out their iCloud details.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Court Rules That Imported Solar Panels Are Bad For US Manufacturing
    The International Trade Commission has ruled that American companies are being hurt by cheap solar panels from overseas, providing an opportunity for President Donald Trump to tax imports from countries like China. The Verge reports: Today's unanimous decision ruled that the companies SolarWorld Americans and Suniva were struggling financially not because of their own poor management, but because they couldn't compete with cheap panels from countries like China, Mexico, and South Korea. Suniva is now suggesting import duties of 40 cents a watt for solar cells, and a floor price of 78 cents a watt for panels. (Right now, the average floor price, worldwide, for panels is about 32 cents.) The Solar Energy Industries Association warned that implementing these suggestions could end up doubling the price of solar, thus destroying demand and causing Americans to lose their jobs.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Microsoft and Canonical Make Custom Linux Kernel
    Billly Gates writes: Microsoft and Canonical's relationship is getting closer besides Ubuntu for Windows. Azure will soon be offering more customized Ubuntu containers with a MS optimized kernel. Uname -r will show 4.11.0-1011-azure for Ubuntu cloud based 16.04 LTS. If you want the non MS kernel you can still use it on Azure by typing: $ sudo apt install linux-virtual linux-cloud-tools-virtual $ sudo apt purge linux*azure $ sudo reboot The article mentions several benefits over the generic Linux kernel for Azure
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Google Experiment Tests Top 5 Browsers, Finds Safari Riddled With Security Bugs
    An anonymous reader writes from a report via Bleeping Computer: The Project Zero team at Google has created a new tool for testing browser DOM engines and has unleashed it on today's top five browsers, finding most bugs in Apple's Safari. Results showed that Safari had by far the worst DOM engine, with 17 new bugs discovered after Fratric's test. Second was Edge with 6, then IE and Firefox with 4, and last was Chrome with only 2 new issues. The tests were carried out with a new fuzzing tool created by Google engineers named Domato, also open-sourced on GitHub. This is the third fuzzing tool Google creates and releases into open-source after OSS-Fuzz and syzkaller. Researchers focused on testing DOM engines for vulnerabilities because they expect them to be the next target for browser exploitation after Flash reaches end-of-life in 2020.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Verizon Backtracks Slightly In Plan To Kick Customers Off Network
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: Verizon Wireless is giving a reprieve to some rural customers who are scheduled to be booted off their service plans, but only in cases when customers have no other options for cellular service. Verizon recently notified 8,500 customers in 13 states that they will be disconnected on October 17 because they used roaming data on another network. But these customers weren't doing anything wrong -- they are being served by rural networks that were set up for the purpose of extending Verizon's reach into rural areas. Today, Verizon said it is extending the deadline to switch providers to December 1. The company is also letting some customers stay on the network -- although they must switch to a new service plan. "If there is no alternative provider in your area, you can switch to the S (2GB), M (4GB), 5GB single-line, or L (8GB) Verizon plan, but you must do so by December 1," Verizon said in a statement released today. These plans range from $35 to $70 a month, plus $20 "line fees" for each line. The 8,500 customers who received disconnection letters have a total of 19,000 lines. Verizon sells unlimited plans in most of the country but said only those limited options would be available to these customers. Verizon also reiterated its promise that first responders will be able to keep their Verizon service even though some public safety officials received disconnection notices. "We have become aware of a very small number of affected customers who may be using their personal phones in their roles as first responders and another small group who may not have another option for wireless service," Verizon said. "After listening to these folks, we are committed to resolving these issues in the best interest of the customers and their communities. We're committed to ensuring first responders in these areas keep their Verizon service."
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Walmart Wants To Deliver Groceries Straight To Your Fridge
    New submitter Rick Schumann writes: Walmart has a new marketing idea: "Going to the store? No one has time for that anymore," Walmart says. They want to partner with a company called August Home, who makes smart locks, so a delivery service can literally deliver groceries right into your refrigerator -- while you watch remotely on your phone. Great, time-saving idea, or super-creepy invasion of your privacy? You decide. Here's how the company says it would work:   1. Place an order on Walmart.com for groceries or other goods.  2. A driver for Deliv -- a same-day delivery service -- retrieves items when the order is ready, and brings them to the customer's home. 3. If no one answers, the delivery person can use a one-time passcode that's been pre-authorized by the customer to open the home's smart lock. 4. The customer receives a smartphone notification when the delivery is occurring, and can choose to watch it all play out in real-time on home security cameras through a dedicated app. 5. Delivery person leaves packages in the foyer, then brings the groceries to the kitchen, unloads them into the fridge, and leaves. 6. Customer receives notification that the door has locked behind them.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Adobe Security Team Accidentally Posts Private PGP Key On Blog
    A member of Adobe's Product Security Incident Response Team (PSIRT) accidentally posted the PGP keys for PSIRT's email account -- both the public and the private keys. According to Ars Technica, "the keys have since been taken down, and a new public key has been posted in its stead." From the report: The faux pas was spotted at 1:49pm ET by security researcher Juho Nurminen. Nurminen was able to confirm that the key was associated with the psirt@adobe.com e-mail account. To be fair to Adobe, PGP security is harder than it should be. What obviously happened is that a PSIRT team member exported a text file from PSIRT's shared webmail account using Mailvelope, the Chrome and Firefox browser extension, to add to the team's blog. But instead of clicking on the "public" button, the person responsible clicked on "all" and exported both keys into a text file. Then, without realizing the error, the text file was cut/pasted directly to Adobe's PSIRT blog.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Passwords For 540,000 Car Tracking Devices Leaked Online
    An anonymous reader quotes a report from The Hacker News: Login credentials of more than half a million records belonging to vehicle tracking device company SVR Tracking have leaked online, potentially exposing the personal data and vehicle details of drivers and businesses using its service. Just two days ago, Viacom was found exposing the keys to its kingdom on an unsecured Amazon S3 server, and this data breach is yet another example of storing sensitive data on a misconfigured cloud server. The Kromtech Security Center was first to discover a wide-open, public-facing misconfigured Amazon Web Server (AWS) S3 cloud storage bucket containing a cache belonging to SVR that was left publicly accessible for an unknown period. Stands for Stolen Vehicle Records, the SVR Tracking service allows its customers to track their vehicles in real time by attaching a physical tracking device to vehicles in a discreet location, so their customers can monitor and recover them in case their vehicles are stolen. The leaked cache contained details of roughly 540,000 SVR accounts, including email addresses and passwords, as well as users' vehicle data, like VIN (vehicle identification number), IMEI numbers of GPS devices. The leaked database also exposed 339 logs that contained photographs and data about vehicle status and maintenance records, along with a document with information on the 427 dealerships that use SVR's tracking services.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.


  • Oracle Announces Java SE 9 and Java EE 8
    rastos1 writes: Oracle has announced the general availability of Java SE 9 (JDK 9), Java Platform Enterprise Edition 8 (Java EE 8) and the Java EE 8 Software Development Kit (SDK). JDK 9 is a production-ready implementation of the Java SE 9 Platform Specification, which was recently approved together with Java EE 8 in the Java Community Process (JCP). Java SE 9 provides more than 150 new features, including a new module system and improvements that bring more scalability, improved security, better performance management and easier development to the world's most popular programming platform.
            

    Read more of this story at Slashdot.












  • UK.gov lays down rules for cross-Whitehall data slurps
    Consultation opens on codes of practice for Digital Economy Act
    The UK government has offered more detail on how public authorities can pass around the data they hold on citizens – a mere five months after the Digital Economy Act passed into law.…



  • Silicon brains ready to plug into London
    It's getting mighty crowded at MCubed
    Events In just over a fortnight we'll be gathering some of the brightest minds in AI, ML and data science together – so of course we'd really like to see you there.…




  • Ethereum-backed hackathon excavates more security holes
    Smart contracts language easy to use and create exploits with
    An Ethereum-backed contest has revealed a few new tricks for disguising malware as the harmless code the network uses to transfer and manipulate funds: digital smart contracts.…


  • How Apple is taming the ad biz. Just don't expect Google or Zuck to follow
    Inside ITP, Safari's third-party cookie zapper
    Can the world's biggest tech company tame the Wild West of the digital ad industry as its data slurping becomes ever more intrusive? Since Facebook and Google are essentially colluding with behavioural data collection, and Microsoft has given up the fight for user privacy, few companies have Apple's means or incentive. But for Apple, privacy doesn't hit its bottom line, and might even increase it.…


  • Shock: Brit capital strips Uber of its taxi licence
    That could mean 40,000 drivers out of work
    Uber's application for a new taxi licence in the UK capital has been rejected. In a shock move, Transport for London today said the app biz is not "fit and proper" to hold a licence.…


  • HPE sharpening the axe for 5,000 heads – report
    All part of CEO Whitman's 'long-term ops and financial blueprint'
    Hewlett Packard Enterprise is about to release the trap door again with 5,000 employees, or almost 10 per cent of its workforce, expected to fall through it.…










  • Cloud washes Dell off perch atop storage market
    Backup appliance sales go off a cliff, traditional array vendors just aren't growing
    Sales of purpose-built backup appliances have dropped markedly, with year-on-year dips of 16.2 per cent by revenue and 14.9 per cent by capacity, according to analyst firm IDC's Worldwide Quarterly Purpose-Built Backup Appliance Tracker for 2017's second quarter.…









  • Facebook, Twitter sucked into US Senate's Russian meddling probe
    Politicians want to know what happened with those fake accounts and advertising dollars
    They may still view themselves as open purveyors of free speech, but increasingly social media giants are being pulled into the US Senate's investigation of Russian interference in the American presidential elections.…










  • Android slingers tout mobes with customized baked-in big-biz configs
    Chocolate Factory pushing enterprises' corporate settings right out of the box
    Google has said it will begin allowing its enterprise customers to purchase pre-configured Android smartphones and other devices that will ship with corporate policies and settings already in place.…




  • Outgoing Cisco exec chair John Chambers joins Sprinklr board
    There is life after the Borg... in social media management platforms apparently
    Outgoing Cisco executive chairman John Chambers is to join the board of directors on social media management outfit Sprinklr, no doubt the first of many non-exec roles the former Switchzilla boss will hold.…


  • Quebec takes mature approach to 'grilled cheese' ban
    It's for the grater good
    After Caerphilly considering its position, Quebec's French-language watchdog has decided it doesn't give edam about its linguistic ban on using "anglicisms" such as "grilled cheese", a move that has been welcomed as gouda news.…



  • Nouveau Developers Remain Blocked By NVIDIA From Advancing Open-Source Driver
    Longtime Nouveau contributors Martin Peres and Karol Herbst presented at this week's XDC2017 X.Org conference at the Googleplex in Mountain View. It was a quick talk as they didn't have a whole lot to report on due to their open-source NVIDIA "Nouveau" driver efforts largely being restricted by NVIDIA Corp...



  • HTTPS By Default For Everyone
    Just a quick heads up for those that haven't noticed yet, HTTPS is now used by default across all of Phoronix.com as of this week...




  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers...



  • RADV Vulkan vs. RadeonSI OpenGL Performance With Linux 4.13 + Mesa 17.3-dev
    It's been a few weeks since last delivering any large RADV/RadeonSI open-source AMD Linux graphics benchmark results due to being busy with testing other hardware as well as battling some regressions / stability problems within the AMDGPU DRM code and Mesa Git. But with Linux 4.13 stable and the newest Mesa 17.3-dev code, things are playing well so here are some fresh OpenGL vs. Vulkan benchmarks on three Radeon graphics cards.



  • Open-Source OpenCL Adoption Is Sadly An Issue In 2017
    While most of the talks that take place at the annual X.Org Developers' Conference are around the exciting progress being made across the Linux graphics landscape, at XDC2017 taking place this week at Google, the open-source GPGPU / compute talk is rather the let down due to the less than desirable state of the open-source OpenCL ecosystem...





  • A Set Of BFQ Improvements Ready For Testing
    Recently I wrote about a BFQ regression fix that should take care of a problem spotted in our recent I/O scheduler Linux 4.13 benchmarks while now that work has yielded a set of four patches working to improve this recently-merged scheduler...




  • Intel's Linux Driver & Mesa Have Hit Amazing Milestones This Year
    Kaveh Nasri, the manager of Intel's Mesa driver team within the Open-Source Technology Center since 2011, spoke this morning at XDC2017 about the accomplishments of his team and more broadly the Mesa community. Particularly over the past year there has been amazing milestones accomplished for this open-source driver stack...



  • The State Of The VC4 Driver Stack, Early Work On VC5
    Eric Anholt of Broadcom just finished presenting at XDC2017 Mountain View on the state of the VC4 driver stack most notably used by the Raspberry Pi devices. Additionally, he also shared about his early work on the VC5 driver for next-generation Broadcom graphics...











  • Mesa Sees An Initial Meson Build System Port
    A few months ago was a vibrant discussion about a Meson proposal for libdrm/Mesa while today the initial patches were posted in bringing a possible Meson build system port for Mesa...


  • NVIDIA Offers Update On Their Proposed Unix Device Memory Allocation Library
    James Jones of NVIDIA presented this morning at XDC2017 with their annual update on a new Unix device memory allocation library. As a reminder, this library originated from NVIDIA's concerns over the Generic Buffer Manager (GBM) currently used by Wayland compositors not being suitable for use with their driver's architecture and then the other driver developers not being interested in switching to EGLStreams, NVIDIA's original push for supporting Wayland...




  • Dive into the details of iOS 11: is Apple still detail-oriented?
    The unfinished feeling in iOS 11 mostly comes from UI and animation. UI elements in iOS are quite inconsistent, mixing a variety of UI elements, which might look quite similar but introduce a disconnected feeling for UX. The inconsistency of those elements majorly stems from those UI element updated in iOS 11, such as Large Title and new Search Bar. In my opinion, those newly introduced elements, which might be unfamiliar and new even to Apple engineers, have caused many inconsistent UI experience in iOS 11.  Many of you will look at this and consider it a bunch of whiny nonsense, but the problem with Apple being lax on details is that it turns into a case of monkey see, monkey do. Third party developers will become lax as well, leading to an overall degradation of UI quality and consistency. This is the last thing iOS, which has never exactly been a visually consistent operating system to begin with, needs.  People go nuts because the ports on the bottom of a Samsung phone - which you effectively never look at - aren't aligned, yet, ever since iOS 7, Apple has basically been winging its iOS UI design and polish.  Something about grading on a curve.


  • Google buys large part of HTC's smartphone team
    Rick Osterloh, Google's senior vice president of hardware, writes:  About a year and a half ago, I joined Google to pursue my dream job to create compelling hardware products, built with Google's smarts at their core. As a first step, we brought together various consumer hardware-related efforts and established a single hardware organization within the company. Our team's goal is to offer the best Google experience - across hardware, software and services - to people around the world. Last fall, we introduced our first family of Made by Google products, including Pixel smartphones, Google Home, Google Wifi, Daydream View and Chromecast Ultra, and we're preparing to unveil our second generation of products on October 4. We're excited about the 2017 lineup, but even more inspired by what's in store over the next five, 10, even 20 years. Creating beautiful products that people rely on every single day is a journey, and we are investing for the long run.  That's why we've signed an agreement with HTC, a leader in consumer electronics, that will fuel even more product innovation in the years ahead. With this agreement, a team of HTC talent will join Google as part of the hardware organization. These future fellow Googlers are amazing folks we've already been working with closely on the Pixel smartphone line, and we're excited to see what we can do together as one team. The deal also includes a non-exclusive license for HTC intellectual property.  This may elicit some flashbacks to Google buying Motorola, but said purchase was more about patents than it was about the company's hardware business - and even after selling Motorola, it turned out this was actually a pretty good deal. Google's sale of Motorola supposedly was part of a series of deals with Samsung, which included a patent-sharing agreement and Samsung promising to stick closer to stock Android.  It seems like Google is feeling more confident now, and is willing to risk agitating Samsung by investing in their own hardware capabilities.


  • Redox 0.3.3 released
    Redox 0.3.3 has been released. Redox is an operating system written in Rust.  This release brings much lower memory usage with ISO - 480 MB instead of 1300 MB. There are also other bug fixes, features, and improvements.


  • Swift 4.0 released
    Swift 4 is now officially released! Swift 4 builds on the strengths of Swift 3, delivering greater robustness and stability, providing source code compatibility with Swift 3, making improvements to the standard library, and adding features like archival and serialization.  You can watch a quick overview of it by watching the WWDC 2017: What's New in Swift presentation, and try out some of the new features in this playground put together by Ole Begemann.


  • iOS 11 on the 2017 iPad Pro 12.9" convinced me it's the future
    iOS 11 has been released, and if you have an iPhone or iPad, you should really update right now. It's a big release, and especially iPad users will get to enjoy an overhauled user experience on their tablets. If you're not convinced, be sure to read the only two reviews you need: the one by fervent and enthusiastic (his enthusiasm for the iPad is infectious, in a good way) iPad user Federico Viticci, and the Ars Technica review written by Andrew Cunningham.   I've been using the betas on my 2017 iPad Pro 12.9", and it truly transforms how you use the iPad, to the point where I can use mine comfortably for work (translating, posting OSNews stories - like this one - and so on). No macOS or Windows laptop is as responsive and fluid as this iPad Pro, and the battery life of this machine is so good, it's probably illegal in 12 US states. Unlike macOS or Windows, I don't have to spend time fighting with iOS 11 to get it to do what I want, like fidgeting with windows, or anxiously managing battery life because otherwise I won't get through a day, or manage applications. And trust me, there's no PC - not even my own ‚4000 monster PC - that is as fluid and responsive as this iPad Pro.  The iPad Pro with iOS 11 is the truest realisation yet of it just works.  I'm not going to claim this is for everyone, or that you should ritually sacrifice your ThinkPad and run to the Apple Store and get the iPad Pro. However, after a few months of use, there's no way I'm ever going back to a traditional laptop. That being said - my only complaint about the 2017 iPad Pro 12.9" is an odd one: it's not a mobile device.  I am a sit down behind my desk kind of person. I work and compute behind a desk, with a large display at eye height and a comfortable chair. The iPad Pro isn't suited for this kind of work, as it forces you to look down, which due to back problems I cannot do for longer periods of time. What I really want is a small iOS box I can hook up a display, keyboard, and mouse to. Apple already makes such a box - the Apple TV - so I know they can do it. Mouse and keyboard support is probably coming to iOS over the coming years, and with the Mac Mini languishing, it feels like they might be working on just such a box.  I'd easily pay ‚500-700 for such a machine.  I know stating iOS is a great general purpose computing platform tends to be controversial - I myself have been skeptical about this very thing for years - but iOS 11 and the iPad Pro have utterly convinced me. This is the platform I want for laptop and desktop computer use. Windows and macOS feel like the past now.


  • CCleaner downloads infected with malware
    Talos recently observed a case where the download servers used by software vendor to distribute a legitimate software package were leveraged to deliver malware to unsuspecting victims. For a period of time, the legitimate signed version of CCleaner 5.33 being distributed by Avast also contained a multi-stage malware payload that rode on top of the installation of CCleaner. CCleaner boasted over 2 billion total downloads by November of 2016 with a growth rate of 5 million additional users per week. Given the potential damage that could be caused by a network of infected computers even a tiny fraction of this size we decided to move quickly. On September 13, 2017 Cisco Talos immediately notified Avast of our findings so that they could initiate appropriate response activities. The following sections will discuss the specific details regarding this attack.  Don't use registry cleaners. They serve no purpose.


  • HP shows us what a real workstation looks like with a 56-core Z8
    If you're a demanding computer user, sometimes your 13-inch Ultrabook laptop just won't quite cut it. For those looking for a little more computing power, HP's new Z8 workstation could be just the answer. The latest iteration of HP's desktop workstations packs in a pair of Intel Skylake-SP processors, topping out with twinned Xeon Platinum 8180 chips: 28 cores/56 threads and 38.5MB cache each running at 2.5-3.8GHz, along with support for up to 1.5TB RAM.  Next year, you'll be able to go higher still with the 8180M processors; same core count and speeds, but doubling the total memory capacity to 3TB, as long as you want to fill the machine's 24 RAM slots.  Those processors and memory can be combined with up to three Nvidia Quadro P6000 GPUs or AMD Radeon Pro WX 9100 parts if you prefer that team. The hefty desktop systems have four internal drive bays, two external (and a third external for an optical drive), and nine PCIe slots. Storage options include up to 4TB of PCIe-mounted SSD, and 48TB of spinning disks. A range of gigabit and 10 gigabit Ethernet adaptors are available; the machines also support 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi and Bluetooth 4.2. Thunderbolt 3 is available with an add-in card.  This is one hell of a beast of a machine, and something most of us will never have the pleasure to use. That being said - I've always been fascinated by these professional workstations, and the HP ones in particular. Current models are obviously way out of my price range, but older models - such as a model from the Z800 range - are more attainable.


  • What the iPhone X borrowed from the Palm Pre
    I have become the unofficial standard bearer for webOS, the operating system created by Palm for the Pre and its successive devices. It was a wildly innovative and smart foundation for a smartphone done in by performance problems, mediocre hardware, and most of all by US carriers who acted as kingmakers for other companies.  So as the bearer of a thoroughly-tattered banner, I€™ve been hearing a lot of people ask what I thought about the iPhone X and how it borrows many of the ideas first introduced by Palm. Here€™s what I think: it€™s great, and also it€™s silly compare the state of tech in 2017 with the state of tech in 2009. Just because Palm did some stuff first doesn€™t take away from Apple is doing them now. Context matters, and our context today is very different.  WebOS had some great ideas, but on a technical level, the operating system was a mess. It was a major battery hog, slow, and basically nothing more than a tech demo made in WebKit on top of a largely unmodified Linux kernel, running on mediocre hardware. WebOS wasn't a product worthy of the Palm name.


  • FSFE: publicly funded software has to be open source
    Digital services offered and used by public administrations are the critical infrastructure of 21st-century democratic nations. To establish trustworthy systems, government agencies must ensure they have full control over systems at the core of our digital infrastructure. This is rarely the case today due to restrictive software licences.  Today, 31 organisations are publishing an open letter in which they call for lawmakers to advance legislation requiring publicly financed software developed for the public sector be made available under a Free and Open Source Software licence.  Good initiative, and a complete and utter no-brainer. Public money, public code.


  • Google renames Fuchia's Magenta kernel to Zircon
    Zircon is the core platform that powers the Fuchsia OS. Zircon is composed of a microkernel (source in kernel/...) as well as a small set of userspace services, drivers, and libraries (source in system/...) necessary for the system to boot, talk to hardware, load userspace processes and run them, etc. Fuchsia builds a much larger OS on top of this foundation.  Google changed the name for this project from Magenta to Zircon, which seems like an opportune time to highlight it.


  • "Honolulu": Microsoft's new Windows Server management tool
    Today, we are thrilled to unveil the next step in our journey for Windows Server graphical management experiences. In less than two weeks at Microsoft Ignite, we will launch the Technical Preview release of Project "Honolulu", a flexible, locally-deployed, browser-based management platform and tools.  Project "Honolulu" is the culmination of significant customer feedback, which has directly shaped product direction and investments. With support for both hybrid and traditional disconnected server environments, Project "Honolulu" provides a quick and easy solution for common IT admin tasks with a lightweight deployment.  I've never managed any servers, so it's difficult for me to gauge how useful of popular tools like these are. What is the usual way people manage their servers?


  • The enduring influence of Metroid
    Metroid, which debuted in 1986, would go on to spawn one of Nintendo's most-revered franchises. The ongoing adventures of bounty hunter Samus Aran differed quite a bit from the company's other big names, like Zelda and Mario. In comparison, Metroid was dark and solemn, with a looming feeling of isolation and a powerfully alien sense of place, inspired in large part by the first Alien film. It was also a game that felt unique in its structure. While Metroid was a 2D, side-scrolling game, it took place in an expansive, interconnected world. Players could explore in a nonlinear fashion, and would often have to return to areas using newfound abilities.  The game went on to spawn a number of beloved follow-ups, including the sublime Super Metroid in 1994, and the Metroid Prime spinoff series that transformed the 2D adventures into a first-person, 3D experience. Most recently, Nintendo is set to release Metroid: Samus Returns on the Nintendo 3DS, the first traditional side-scrolling Metroid in nearly a decade. But the importance of Metroid can be seen in more than the games released by Nintendo. The series has also had a profound influence on gaming as a whole, inspiring a generation of designers along the way.  I ordered a special edition New 3DS XL just for the new Samus Returns. The Metroid series is one of my favourite series in gaming, and many of them are classics all of us have played at some point in our lives. Personally, I greatly prefer the 2D, side-scrolling Metroid games, as the series foray into 3D/FPS - the Prime series - fell a bit flat to me.


  • The dystopia we signed up for
    The world has become like an eerily banal dystopian novel. Things look the same on the surface, but they are not. With no apparent boundaries on how algorithms can use and abuse the data that's being collected about us, the potential for it to control our lives is ever-growing.  Our drivers' licenses, our keys, our debit and credit cards are all important parts of our lives. Even our social media accounts could soon become crucial components of being fully functional members of society. Now that we live in this world, we must figure out how to maintain our connection with society without surrendering to automated processes that we can neither see nor control.


  • Why you shouldn't unlock your phone with your face
    If you value the security of your data€Š-€Šyour email, social media accounts, family photos, the history of every place you've ever been with your phone€Š-€Šthen I recommend against using biometric identification.  Instead, use a passcode to unlock your phone.  Can't argue with that - especially in place where law enforcement often takes a... Liberal approach to detainees.


  • Apple's A11 Bionic SoC is kind of insane
    With the iPhone X revealed, we really have to start talking about its processor and SoC - the A11 Bionic. It's a six-core chip with two high-power cores, four low-power cores, and this year, for the first time, includes an Apple-designed custom GPU. It also has what Apple calls a Neural Engine, designed to speed up tasks such as face recognition.  Apple already had a sizeable performance lead over competing chips from Qualcomm (what Android phones use) in single-core performance, and the A11 blasts past those in multicore performance, as well. Moreover, the A11 also performs better than quite a number of recent desktop Intel chips from the Core i5 and i7 range, which is a big deal.  For quite a few people it's really hard to grasp just how powerful these chips are - and to a certain extent, it feels like much of that power is wasted in an iPhone, which is mostly doing relatively mundane tasks anyway. Now that Apple is also buildings its own GPUs, it's not a stretch to imagine a number of mobile GPU makers feeling a bit... Uneasy.  At some point, these Apple Ax chips will find their way to something more sizable than phones and tablets.


  • V. Anton Spraul's Think Like a Programmer, Python Edition

    What is programming? Sure, it consists of syntax and the assembly of code, but it is essentially a means to solve problems. To study programming, then, is to study the art of problem solving, and a new book from V. Anton Spraul, Think Like a Programmer, Python Edition, is a guide to sharpening skills in both spheres.
       


  • Do you use Ansible?
    A quick question today about automation... Do you use Ansible?              Yes    No                


  • Manifold Makes Managing Cloud Developer Services Easy

    We love it here when superheroes drop their cloak of invisibility, emerge from stealth mode and reveal themselves to the world. Of course we do—it's the geek in us! Manifold has just done exactly that, emerged from stealth mode and is claiming to be the easiest way to find, buy and manage essential developer services. 
       


  • Sysadmin 101: Leveling Up

    This is the fourth in a series of articles on systems administrator fundamentals. These days, DevOps has made even the job title "systems administrator" seems a bit archaic like the "systems analyst" title it replaced.
       


  • YouTube on the Big Screen

    For years I've been jealous of folks with iOS devices who could just send their phone screens to their Apple TV devices. It seems like the Android screen-mirroring protocols never work right for me. My Sony Xperia has multiple types of screen mirroring, and none of them seem to work on my smart TVs or Roku devices. 
       


  • Key Considerations for Software Updates for Embedded Linux and IoT

    The Mirai botnet attack that enslaved poorly secured connected embedded devices is yet another tangible example of the importance of security before bringing your embedded devices online. A new strain of Mirai has caused network outages to about a million Deutsche Telekom customers due to poorly secured routers.
       


  • Paragon Software Group's Paragon ExtFS for Mac

    Ever more Mac aficionados are discovering the virtues of Linux, especially when their older hardware can experience a renaissance. One annoying barrier to dual-boot nirvana is filesystem incompatibility, whereby the Linux side can access the Mac side, but Apple's macOS doesn't support Linux drives at all—not even in read-only mode.  
       


  • Caldwell Partners' Cyber Advisory Board Service

    For many enterprises, cyber risk is the top business risk. Meanwhile, there is simply not a sufficiently large talent pool of cyber-risk professionals to satisfy the ever-growing demand.
       


  • Solving Physics Problems on Linux

    Several years ago, I wrote an article on using Elmer to solve complicated physics problems. Elmer has progressed quite a bit since then, so I thought it would be worth taking a fresh look at this simulation software. 
       


  • I'll Gladly Pay You Tuesday for a Hamburger Today

    My day job pays me on the 15th and last day of every month, unless those days land on a weekend, in which case I get paid the Friday before. With those rules, creating a Google Calendar event is shockingly difficult. In fact, it's not possible to create a recurring event with those rules using Google's GUI scheduling tool. 
       


  • Watermarking Images--from the Command Line

    Us geeks mostly think of the command line as the best place for text manipulation. It's a natural with cat, grep and shell scripts. But although you can't necessarily view your results from within a typical terminal window, it turns out to be pretty darn easy to analyze and manipulate images from within a shell script. 
       



  • Non-Linux FOSS: Mac2Imgur

    I love to share images with people quickly. They could be cat photos or screenshots. Usually I post those silly images to Twitter and Facebook using Buffer, but occasionally, I just want to send a quick image to a single person. (This is usually when I'm trying to show my computer via screenshot.) 
       



  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications

    Saving customers time, effort and budget as they implement SAP landscapes, including on-premises and now on-demand, are the core selling points for SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP Applications.

    The latest release of the SAP-focused SUSE Linux server is also now available as the operating system for SAP solutions on Google Cloud Platform (GCP).  
       




  • Extended File Attributes Rock!
    Worldwide, data is growing at a tremendous rate. However, one recent study has pointed out that the size of files is not necessarily growing at the same rate; meaning the number of files is growing rapidly. How do we manage all of this data and files? While the answer to that question is complex, one place we can start is with Extended File Attributes. Continue reading


  • Checksumming Files to Find Bit-Rot
    In a previous article extended file attributes were presented. These are additional bits of metadata that are tied to the file and can be used in a variety of ways. One of these ways is to add checksums to the file so that corrupted data can be detected. Let's take a look at how we can do this including some simple Python examples. Continue reading



  • What’s an inode?
    As you might have noticed, we love talking about file systems. In these discussions the term "inode" is often thrown about. But what is an inode and how does it relate to a file system? Glad you asked. Continue reading




  • Emailing HPC
    Email is not unlike MPI. The similarities may help non-geeks understand parallel computers a little better. Continue reading



  • iotop: Per Process I/O Usage
    Based on a reader comment, we take iotop for a spin to see if it can be used for monitoring the IO usage of individual processes on a system. The result? It has some interesting capability that we haven't found in other tools. Continue reading





  • SandForce 1222 SSD Testing, Part 3: Detailed Throughput Analysis
    Our last two articles have presented an initial performance examination of a consumer SandForce based SSD from a throughput and IOPS perspective. In this article we dive deeper into the throughput performance of the drive, along with a comparison to an Intel X-25E SSD. I think you will be surprised at what is discovered. Continue reading


  • Putting Drupal to Work
    Drupal is a simple but powerful CMS. However, you'll probably want to configure it. Learn how to tweak Drupal's settings to your liking. Continue reading


  • SandForce 1222 SSD Testing – Part 2: Initial IOPS Results
    SandForce has developed a very interesting and unique SSD controller that uses real-time data compression. This affects data throughput and SSD longevity. In this article, we perform an initial examination of the IOPS performance of a SandForce 1222-based SSD. The results can be pretty amazing. Continue reading


  • Drupal at Warp Speed
    Need to setup Drupal CMS but don't have the time to learn how? Try this 30 minute quick start guide. Continue reading


  • Chasing The Number
    The Top500 list is a valuable measure of HPC progress, but the race it has spawned maybe over for many organizations Continue reading


  • Stick a Fork in Flock: Why it Failed
    This probably won't come as a surprise to many, but the "social Web browser" has thrown in the towel. Don't cry for the Flock team - they're flying the coop for Zynga to go make Facebook games or something. But Flock's loyal fans are out in the cold. Why'd Flock fail? There's a few lessons to be learned. Continue reading


Page last modified on November 02, 2011, at 05:01 PM